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Full text of "Town Report"

LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY, MASS 



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REPORT 



of the 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



of the 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1990 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 9 

Town Clerk 24 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 50 

Town Accountant 54 

Board of Assessors 62 

Collector of Taxes 65 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire & Police Departments 67 

Civil Defense & Emergency Preparedness 70 

Public Safety Study Committee 71 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring & Plumbing 73 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 75 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 76 

Council on Aging 80 

Minuteman Home Care 81 

Dog Officer 82 

North East Solid Waste Committee 83 

Recycling Committee 86 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 87 

Board of Appeals 90 

Long Range Planning Committee 93 

Conservation Commission 94 

Aquifer Protection Study Committee 97 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 98 

Housing Commission 102 

Water Commissioners 105 

Public Works 108 

Planning Committee for 1991 Town-Wide Conference 109 

Pierce Property Committee 111 

Cemetery Commissioners 112 



Historical Commission 113 

Historic District Commission 114 

Route 128 Area Committee 115 

Roadside Path Committee 116 

Codman Community Farms 117 

Bemis Hall Advisory Committee 121 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 122 

Personnel Board 123 

LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library 124 

DeCordova Museum & Park 131 

Lincoln Arts Lottery Council 133 

Celebrations Committee 141 

Recreation Committee 142 

Strats Place Committee . 143 

Lincoln-Matadepera Exchange Committee 144 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 145 

Elementary School Committee 145 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 153 

Lincoln Scholarship Committee 167 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 163 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School 171 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 179 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 183 

Valuation List 197 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1990-91 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



Every Monday evening, 7:30 pm 
Town Offices Building 259-8850 

Every other Monday evening, 8:00 pm 
Superintendent's Office 259-9400 

For appointments, call Town Offices 
Building, 259-8850 

First Monday evening of each month, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 7:30 pm Town Offices Bldg. 

Every other Monday evening, 8:00 pm 
Town Offices Building 

See bulletin board, Town Offices 
Building 

5,076 (Town Census) 

14.56 square miles 

$10.96 

March 23, 1991 

(Saturday before last Monday In March) 

March 25, 1991 

(Last Monday in March) 



Residence in Town of Lincoln 

3,528 (As of December 1, 1991) 

Open Monday through Friday, 

8:30 am to 4:30 pm (Closed Saturdays) 

Telephone 259-8850 (All departments) 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Katherine S. McHugh 

Harriet B. Todd 

Warren F. Flint, Jr., Chairman 

1990 saw much activity both on the local and regional level. 
There were some successful completions, some disappointments and many 
ongoing issues. 

With the transfer station construction complete, recycling of 
newspapers, glass and office paper was begun. The Public Safety 
Study Committee issued its report, paving the way for an assessment 
of fire and police functions and space utilization in the public 
safety building. Battle Road Farm continues to grow as a model mixed 
income development, despite some financial setbacks during the year. 

Route 2 continues to occupy Lincoln's time but now much more 
positively, as construction on safety upgrades proceed. Hanscom 
Field was much in the news with the proposal of Continental Airlines 
for commuter service and the start of an airport noise monitoring 
study. Minute Man Park also made headlines with the completion of 
its General Management Plan and then the subsequent withdrawal of 
legislation, which would have made possible the implementation of the 
plan. 

Over all loomed the state fiscal crisis, the threat of further 
reduced revenues and the pressures of increasing property taxes to 
fund ever growing expenses. Because of the fiscal crunch and a sense 
of the need for the Town to reassess its priorities, the Selectmen 
have begun the planning process for a Town-wide Conference in October 
1991. These and many other activities are described in greater 
detail below. 

Town Departments and Town Services 

Lincoln continued to receive the excellent service from its Town 
departments that citizens have come to expect. In addition to the 
continuing routine work, there were some new or improved programs in 
1990 worthy of mention. 

In July, Vincent DeAmicis and Patrick Allen became permanent 
superintendents of the highway and water departments, respectively. 
They each continue to provide excellent direction for their public 
works activities which has resulted in an increase in productivity in 
both departments. The DPW has begun a ten year road reconstruction 
program of which Codman Road was the first project. Each rebuilt 
road should last for at least 20 years requiring little or no 
maintenance. Lincoln Road by Town Offices will be the next project 



now that the drainage under the road and through Pierce Park has been 
repaired. Lincoln's low salt use for snow removal (5% vs. 25-50% in 
surrounding towns) makes keeping roads clear in the winter more 
difficult. The DPW crew does very well within this constraint, but 
"minimum salt use" warning signs have been posted to remind motorists 
to use caution. 

The water department's major project is a water quality study to 
determine if a filtration plant is needed at Flint's Pond. The Town 
fervently hopes to comply with Federal and State drinking water 
regulations without incurring the enormous expense of filtration. 
Local concern, for water quality has prompted the Aquifer Protection 
Study Committee to draft an underground fuel storage tank bylaw 
requiring the removal of tanks after 20 years. The bylaw will 
probably be a warrant article at the 1991 Annual Town Meeting. 

Recycling of newspaper, glass and office paper began at the 
completed transfer station in 1990, joining metal and wood as items 
removed from Lincoln's solid waste for reuse. Despite the volatility 
of the market for recycled goods which means at times not being able 
to find a buyer, the Selectmen are committed to continuing the 
program, and expanding it to new materials as they become cost 
effective. We have started using recycled paper for photocopying at 
Town Offices as Lincoln's contribution to increasing demand for 
recycled supplies. The Town, with the assistance of the League of 
Women Voters, held another successful Hazardous Waste Collection 
Day. We are grateful to the League and Town staff, whose advance 
planning and organization on the day itself made for rapid, efficient 
service to the approximately 165 cars which came. 

The Public Safety Study Committee completed its report which 
looked at public safety needs for the next ten years and gave options 
for needed space utilization improvements and maintenance on the 
fire/police station. The Selectmen have drafted a charge for a 
Building Committee to work with a consultant to arrive at specific 
recommendations for the best functional use of building space for 
public safety personnel at a reasonable cost. In ongoing operations, 
the police have instituted a goal of 80 hours of radar patrol a 
month. This has greatly increased the number of citations this year, 
and, we hope, had an effect on the speed of traffic within the Town. 

As a result of the Town Meeting vote, two more firefighters were 
added to the force, making it possible to have three-person coverage 
around the clock. The Selectmen are continuing to pursue with the 
Air Force the idea of mutual aid which would provide the best, most 
cost effective fire protection for North Lincoln. We have received 
several letters during the year commending individual police officers 
and firefighters for outstanding response in specific instances. We 
view this as a tribute to the high quality of our public safety 
personnel. 

Two new programs tried in 1990 were mosquito spraying and the 
use of a contracted dog officer rather than a Town employee to handle 
dog complaints. After much heated discussion, the mosquito spraying 
authorized by Town Meeting was approved by the appropriate boards. 
Both aerial and ground spraying of Bti was done. It remains a 
question whether the noticeable decline In the mosquito population 



was due to the spraying or a very dry July. In March, the Tovra 
contracted with Les Boardraan to provide dog officer service at a 
considerable saving. So far, the results seem very positive. The 
Town also saved money by, again, using inmates from the Sheriff 
Department's Community Service Program to paint Town buildings. 
There was an unfortunate escape from one of the work crews (the 
prisoner was recaptured within hours), but other than that, the jobs 
were completed very satisfactorily. 

The Town Office staff continue to provide the Town with 
professional and dedicated administrative and financial services. 
This year the State Legislature passed Chapter 30B which greatly 
increased regulations and paperwork for all Town and school purchases 
and contracts over $1,000. Our thanks to Executive Secretary David 
Ramsay and Town Accountant/ Finance Director Betty Lang for seeing 
that all departments complied with the law, in addition to their 
numerous other duties. The Town Personnel Handbook was updated this 
year in a continuing effort to see that all non-union staff are 
properly accountable and are treated in an equitable manner. The 
Selectmen remain appreciative of all Town employees who give such 
high quality service to the Town. 

Regional Issues and Traffic 

Numerous regional issues occupied the Selectmen's time during 
1990, some involving traffic, others not. The item which attracted 
the most public attention was the proposal by Continental Airlines to 
start commuter air service between Hanscom Field and Newark. At the 
overflow hearing at Bemis Hall on Continental's Environmental 
Notification Form (ENF) , local and state elected officials and 
numerous citizens from the four surrounding towns spoke in opposition 
to the proposed service and in favor of the State requiring an 
Environmental Impact Statement (EIR). Secretary DeVillars ruled that 
an EIR was necessary, and Continental eventually dropped its plans. 

The Continental proposal came just as Massport was starting a 
Part 150 study to measure airport noise with a view to adopting 
mitigating measures. A committee was established to monitor the 
study and work with Massport and its consultants. The committee is 
made up of members from the four surrounding communities, Lincoln, 
Concord, Bedford and Lexington, representatives of Massport, and 
airport users. The community representatives have hired a technical 
consultant paid for by Massport, and a lawyer contracted by the four 
towns to ensure that the noise measurements and the suggested 
mitigations are significantly beneficial to the communities. 
Massport has also issued an ENF in anticipation of updating their 
Generic EIR which has been in effect since 1985. The GEIR is meant 
to govern airport activity from an environmental point of view. 

The Hanscom Area Towns Committee (HATS), in addition to being 
involved with the Massport issues mentioned above, has received the 
report on the study it contracted to be done by the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council (MAPC). The study looks at roads and intersections 
in the four Hanscom towns, and prioritizes the ones most In need of 
upgrading. The report includes specific suggestions for remediation 
as well as general suggestions on managing and controlling growth and 



traffic. HATS is working on how to implement the study* s 
recommendations. Less successful was an attempt by HATS to have 
enacted a bill which would give each town zoning control over 
non-airport operational related construction on Massport land within 
its borders. The bill failed to pass in the Legislature. The Air 
Force has proposed that businesses at Hanscom Field make payments in 
lieu of taxes to the HATS to be used for traffic mitigating 
measures. HATS is enthusiastically exploring this possibility. 

MAPC has completed its own planning document for the whole 
metropolitan area called MetroPlan 2000 . It is a plan for the region 
which provides a policy tool with which to guide growth and 
development. The plan would encourage the growth of subregional 
centers to provide both housing and jobs within an area, to cut down 
the need for suburb to city and suburb to suburb commuting. 

Minute Man Park has also had its successes and disappointments. 
Early in the year, Lawrence Gall became the new park superintendent. 
An example of his innovative approach to making the park more 
meaningful was the Colonial Weekend held in October. The General 
Management Plan which had been many years in the making was finally 
approved. The Lincoln Selectmen supported the legislation which 
would have allowed the park to acquire additional acreage, provided 
funds to begin implementation of the General Management Plan and 
given protection against rent increases to four families living in 
the park. However, there was strong opposition to the legislation in 
Concord, so the Concord Selectmen voted not to support it and it was 
withdrawn. One unresolved issue between Lincoln and Minute Man Park 
remains the access road to the transfer station. We have bean unable 
to agree on a suitable exchange which would allow Lincoln to acquire 
an easement to the road enabling us to pave it. 

A regional idea which seemed promising, but so far has come to 
nothing, grew out of the Cambridge Reservoir Watershed Protection 
Plan. Waltham and Cambridge and the three area towns agreed to a 
Memorandum of Understanding for an advisory committee which would 
have made recommendations for individual and joint actions to enhance 
protection of the watershed area. For reasons unknown to us, the 
committee was never formed. However, the Selectmen did receive for 
comment an ENF to improve drainage on Routes 2 and 128, to prevent 
the road runoff from going directly into the reservoir. This was a 
major recommendation of the Protection Plan, and when complete, will 
greatly slow down the buildup of salt and other road contaminants in 
the reservoir. 

Progress continues to be made on the safety upgrades of Route 
2. The section east of Bedford Road to Route 128 has been 
completed. After receiving complaints from the neighborhood 
residents, the Selectmen were successful in getting the state DPW to 
agree to moving the large sign for Route 95 away from the Page Road 
area. Much to the Town's surprise, construction on the Bedford Road 
intersection, which had been held up for lack of funds, began in the 
fall. Once again, the Selectmen have found state officials 
cooperative in trying to address residents' concerns regarding 
excessive street lights and inadequate screening. The state plans 
eventually to upgrade Route 2 from Bedford Road to the reformatory 
circle in Concord. The state DPW has agreed to incorporate local 



concerns into its design plans. The Selectmen have written a letter 
outlining in detail what we consider important for Lincoln, in 
particular, safe access to the side streets and residences along that 
stretch of the road and adequate screening for abutting houses. 
Although the problems of Route 2 will be with us for many years, we 
are encouraged that progress is being made, and in a way that is 
sensitive to Lincoln's needs as well as those of the through traffic. 

Construction in Waltham is also a perennial concern for Lincoln 
because of the traffic generated which uses Lincoln's roads. A large 
project on Second Avenue, off Route 128, has been approved, and Bay 
Colony is seeking approval for phase 4 over Lincoln's objections. It 
was with ironic pleasure that Lincoln joined Waltham in protesting 
through our Congressman the siting of a major mail sorting facility 
on the Waltham/Lexington line. Lincoln boards are attempting to take 
a proactive approach on the Boston Properties parcel, working with 
the owner to try to ensure that the eventual developer will agree to 
funnel commuter traffic toward Route 128 and not allow it to use Old 
County Road and Winter Street into Lincoln. 

Within Lincoln, the Lincoln Road/Route 117 intersection was the 
subject of much discussion between Town boards and staff and 
residents of the area. It is the source of much of the commuter 
traffic through Town, and its configuration makes it dangerous. 
After much discussion, it appeared that any major change, such as no 
left turn off Route 117, would have an adverse impact elsewhere. So, 
only minor changes such as brush clearing and signage were agreed 
upon. 

The MBTA plans to upgrade the commuter rail station are on hold 
because of lack of funds. But the major safety concern, allowing the 
gates to go up when the eastbound train is in the station, has been 
addressed. When the station is upgraded, the problem of charging 
parking fees in the commuter lots, which the MBTA insists on, will 
have to be resolved. 

Land Use and Housing 



1990 was a rollercoaster year for the mixed income development, 
Battle Road Farm. The year began with phase 1 fully occupied and 
construction starting on phase 2. Then the bank which had made the 
construction loan failed. The Selectmen and Lincoln House Associates 
had many frustrating meetings with officials from FDIC to try to get 
the loan reinstated. In the end, new financing was obtained from 
MHFA as well as an increase in the grant from EOCD to finance the 
sewage treatment plant. Battle Road Farm continues to be a model of 
an affordable housing development, and the Town of Lincoln remains 
committed to its success. 

Lincoln also continues to pursue scattered site affordable 
housing opportunities. The Town will soon have a lease on the second 
house built by Minuteman VoTech on Mill Street for rental through the 
Housing Commission, and a third house is being built by the school. 
There is also a possibility that some of the lots which were bought 
by the state DPW for the relocation of Route 2 may be packaged for 
development as half subsidized, half market rate, single family 
homes. There is still a question of whether the lots are buildable 



and whether a developer can be found. 

1990 saw the passage of the bill to make Lincoln's Housing 
Commission into a Housing Authority, with the exception of needing 
Town Meeting approval to exercise the power of eminent domain and the 
requirement to report to Town Meeting on its activities, which would 
not otherwise come up during discussion of related budget and zoning 
items. Unfortunately, at this time there is no state money available 
for new housing programs. 

A major change in land use will occur as a result of the 
purchase of the Bethany property on Sandy Pond Road by the Japanese 
language school, Bunsai Gakuen. The school in Lincoln will be an 
overseas campus for Bunsai Gakuen 's two year foreign language college 
program. The school will open in April 1991 with 125 students. The 
number will increase to about 200 over the next few years before 
school officials have to decide whether to attempt to obtain 
approvals to put in a sewage treatment plant to allow., for further 
expansion. 

Two continuing land use issues on our borders which affect 
Lincoln are Walden Woods and the legislation to study the Sudbury, 
Concord and Assabet Rivers for possible inclusion in the Wild and 
Scenic Rivers program. Walden Woods became headline news when rock 
star Don Henley became involved in saving from development two 
parcels of land in Concord which figure prominently in Thoreau's 
writings. The condominium site overlooking the Sudbury River has 
been purchased by the Trust for Public Lands. The office park land 
on the corner of Routes 2 and 126 is still under negotiation. An 
earlier proposal to seek National Historic Landmark designation for 
2500 acres of "Walden Woods" appears to be on hold. The legislation 
to study the three rivers for inclusion in the federal Wild and 
Scenic Rivers program was passed by Congress in the fall with the 
support of the eight towns which touch the designated river 
sections. Lincoln supported the bill both as a means of controlling 
development along the river, and to forestall diversion of the 
Sudbury River by the MWRA. Lincoln remains vigilant against 
diversion proposals which seem to come up about once a year. 

Fiscal Concerns 

The state fiscal crisis and local budget constraints hung over 
Lincoln's activities all year. The impoundment of a portion of local 
aid by the Governor, and the fear that the FY 90 state budget would 
be balanced by withholding a large portion of the second local aid 
payment, led to conservative budgeting for Lincoln's FY 91 budget. 
This paid off as Lincoln was able to weather the crisis and absorb a 
large cut in FY 91 state aid without having to call a special town 
meeting to rework the budget. The fear that Question #3, the 
Citizens for Limited Taxation petition to roll back taxes ani fees, 
would pass made Lincoln board members very nervous as we began 
working on the FY 92 budget in the fall. We officially opposed 
Question #3 and supported Question #5, which would return 40% of the 
state's income, corporate and sales taxes, to the cities and towns. 
Although Question #3 failed and Question #5 passed, it is still 
uncertain whether local aid can be maintained even at the current 
reduced level, given that the State continues to project a deficit in 

6 



its own budget. Because of decreases in non-tax revenue and growth 
in expenses well beyond the 2 1/2 % allowed by Proposition 2 1/2, an 
override of $400,000 was needed last March, and a higher one will be 
needed in March 1991. Even so, there were minor cuts in Town 
services, with more expected next year. The Selectmen appreciate the 
support of the voters on budget matters and look to the upcoming 
Town-wide Conference for further direction on taxes and spending. 

Community Credits 

Nowhere is Lincoln's unique approach to involvement of its 
citizens in local government decisions more apparent than in the 
periodic Toxm-wide Conferences held to discuss and gain consensus on 
the future direction the Town will take on specific issues. 
Recognizing that fiscal realities will mean the choice between major 
property tax increases for the foreseeable future, or cutbacks in 
services, the Selectmen have planned a Town -wide Conference for 
October 1991, to discuss spending priorities. A committee has been 
formed to gather background information and to seek input from Town 
boards, Town organizations and citizens, in general, on topics for 
the conference within the overall objectives set by the Selectmen. 
We believe this conference will be as important as those in the past 
in defining Lincoln's values and giving direction for the future. 

As always, community life flourished in Lincoln. The exchange 
of students with our sister city, Matadepera, had a second successful 
summer. Codman Community Farms survived staff problems at the 
beginning of the year to hold another wonderful harvest fair, and 
begin anew for 1991, with a farmer and assistant farmer on board. A 
blown up picture of the Codman garden plots as an example of 
community farming is now part of the display depicting agriculture in 
Massaachusetts at Logan Airport. Earth Day was celebrated in Lincoln 
with a resolution at Town Meeting and other activities including 
hosting one day of the Walden Earthcare Congress. The heads of the 
Lincoln Youth Baseball and Soccer Leagues attempted to upgrade and 
expand the playing fields for the two sports through private and 
volunteer resources. Though the attempts have not yet borne fruit, 
the Selectmen are aware of the importance of the two sports to the 
Town's children, and the need to adequately maintain the playing 
fields we now have. DeCordova Museum received some negative 
attention from residents when the success of its summer concerts 
threatened to overwhelm the Town. The Trustees responded very 
quickly and agreed to drastically alter the concert program for next 
summer. Adverse feelings were soon forgotten in the universal 
admiration for the Museum's wonderful exhibit of National Geographic 
photographs . 

One sad note was the need to cut down the elm tree in Pierce 
Park which stood so long as a symbol for Lincoln. But in true 
Lincoln fashion, a group of citizens has volunteered to find a 
suitable replacement which will remind Lincoln residents 100 years 
from now of the importance of continuity and community. 

No report on Lincoln could be complete without recognizing the 
efforts of the many volunteers that serve on Town boards and 
committees. Lincoln would not be the Town it is without the energy 



and dedication of those citizens willing to put in the many hours 
necessary to conduct the affairs of the Town. Two outstanding 
examples of Lincoln volunteer spirit retired this year. Susan Fargo 
brought to the Board of Selectmen a conviction that Lincoln can and 
would do things in the best possible way and spent the time working 
with other boards and staff to make that true. We will miss her wide 
knowledge of the workings of local, county and state government, as 
well as her "pun-ishing" sense of humor. Quincy Adams was the 
architect of Lincoln's open space plan and worked tirelessly on the 
Conservation Commission to see his vision of a Lincoln greenbelt 
become a reality. Other public servants who retired this year are 
Sally Bobbitt and Wendy Kameny from the School Committee, David 
Pettit from the Lincoln-Sudbury School Committee, Monika Duborg and 
John Walker from the Recreation Committee, Charlotte Barnaby and 
Gloria Tinder from the Council on Aging, Mickie Rice and Richard Lee 
from the Arts Council and Richard Theriault as Representative to the 
Hanscom Field Advisory Committee and HATS. We thank them all and 
wish them well in their new endeavors. 

We are very pleased that, as a result of a special election in 
May and reelection in the fall, Cile Hicks is representing Lincoln 
once again. As our Representative before redistricting, she worked 
hard on Lincoln's behalf. We look forward to continuing to work with 
her as our Senator. 

Sadly, we must also mention the deaths of some notable citizens, 
for whose contribution we are all grateful. William Davis, Arnold 
MacLean and John Carman were Chairmen of the Council on Aging, the 
Cemetery Commission and the Historic District Commission, 
respectively, when they each unexpectedly passed on. William Whalen 
was for many years a police and fire communicator and call 
firefighter before his retirement a few years ago. An Wang was known 
to the world as a computer entrepreneur but appreciated in Lincoln 
for his generous contributions to Town activities. 

In conclusion, though we know there will be some hard choices 
ahead because of fiscal constraints, we feel confident that Town 
officials, staff and citizens working together can continue to ensure 
that Lincoln remains a truly special place to live. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



?erm Expires 



David M. Donaldson 1993 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 1991 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Warren F. Flint, Jr., Chairman 1991 

Katherine S. McHugh 1993 

Harriet B. Todd 1992 

TOWN TREASURER 

George C. Hibben 1991 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1993 

Robert L. Jenal 1991 

Paul Marsh 1992 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Roy M. Raja 1992 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Maria Churchill 1993 

Jennifer W. Donaldson 1992 

Michaela M. Lipsey 1991 

Henry M. Morgan, Chairman 1992 

Leslie Vagliano 1993 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Leona Champeny 1993 

Robert DeNormandie 1992 

Gabriel Farrell, Chairman 1991 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan M. Comstock 1991 

Perry Culver, M.D., Chairman 1993 

John M. O'Loughlin, M.D. 1992 



Term Expires 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Joanne Fraser 

William C. Hewins 

Sarah Cannon Holden, Chairman 

Geraldine C. Nogelo 

Frederick Pryor 

Phyllis Rappaport 



1992 
1991 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1993 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Martha DeNormandie 

Marjorie Holland 

H. Arnold MacLean, Chairman (deceased) 



1992 
1993 
1991 



PLANNING BOARD 



F. Douglas Adams, Chairman 
Kenneth E. Bassett 
Elizabeth Corcoran 
Margery P. Faran 
Dilla G. Tingley 



1993 
1992 
1991 
1995 
1994 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Susan Fargo 



1991 



FENCE VIEWER 



Wendy Kameny 



1991 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



George C. Hibben (resigned) 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 
Conrad Todd (appointed) 



1991 
1992 
1993 
1991 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



John Curtis Perry 
Harriet V. Relman 
W. Allen Rossiter 



1993 
1992 
1991 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Craig Hill 

Douglas Harding, Chairman 

Mary Newman 

Carol White (School Committee's Appointee) 

Barbara Low (Elected by Town) 

Bruce Bare (Selectmen's Appointee) 



self -perpetuating 



1991 
1992 
1993 



10 



Term Expires 

DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Trustees 



Robert C. Frank 1991 

John French 1994 

Gregory G. Harney 1992 

Jonathan Cohen 1993 

"B" Trustees 



Meredyth Hyatt Moses (School Committee's Appointee) 1992 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustee's Appointee) 1991 

Laurie Dewey (Selectmen's Appointee) 1993 

HOUSING COMMISSION 



Giles Browne 1992 

William G. Constable 1992 

Raymond Johnson (Appointed by the State), Co-Chairman 1994 

Elizabeth (Lee) Harrison, Co-Chairman 1991 

Suzanne Werner Ross (Selectmen's Appointee) 1994 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams, Chairman (Elected Post) 1992 

Elizabeth Evans (Elected Post) 1993 

Peter Watkinson (Elected Post) 1991 

Kathleen S. Coleman (Selectmen's Appointee) 1993 

George W. Seeley (Selectmen's Appointee) 1991 

Richard Wiggin (Selectmen's Appointee) 1992 



11 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Term Expires 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

David W. Ramsay 1991 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT/ FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Betty L. Lang 1991 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Alyson A. Morse 1991 

TOWN COUNSEL 

David Dinwoodey 1991 

Thomas Arnold 1991 

TOWN ENGINEER 

Frank C. Emmons, Jr. 1991 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Vincent D'Amicis 1991 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER DEPARTMENT 
Patrick Allen 1991 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Dominick James Arena 1991 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POL ICE -PROSECUTOR 
Charles E. Doyle 

POLICE SERGEANT 

David Davis 



INSPECTOR 
Allen Bowles 



1991 



1991 



1991 



12 






POLICE OFFICERS 



Term Expires 



Barbara Bardsley 1991 

John Fitzgerald 1991 

Robert Gallo 1991 

Richard J. Hallett 1991 

Patrick Kenney 1991 

Gerald Mahoney 1991 

Kevin Mooney 1991 

Thomas Moran 1991 

CONSTABLES 

Dominick James Arena 1991 

Charles E. Doyle 1991 

DOG OFFICER 

Leslie Boardman 1991 

FIRE CHIEF 

Dominick James Arena 1991 

TREE WARDEN 
LOCAL SUPT. OF SHADE TREE MANAGEMENT 

Todd Brovm 1989 

FOREST WARDEN 

Dominick James Arena 1991 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Ernest L. Johnson 1991 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ernest L. Johnson 1991 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

Kenneth Desmond 1991 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Russell J. Dixon 1991 

DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Thomas B. Moran 1991 



13 



Term Expires 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

David W. Ramsay 1991 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Curtis A. Risley 1991 

ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

F. John Solman 1991 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 

Richard Goddard 1991 

VETERANS' AGENT 

William B. Whalen (deceased) 1991 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 

William B. Whalen (deceased) 1991 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1991 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Pesgy Elliot 1992 

William G. Langton 1991 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 1993 
Nancy J. Zuelke, Ex officio 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 

Ruth Morey l" 2 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams (resigned) 1991 

Thomas Billings, Chairman 1993 

Claire Cunningham 1993 

Joan Kimball 1993 

Christopher Klem 1992 

Robert Mack 1"! 

Nathalie Rice l" 2 



14 



Term Expires 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Albert Avery 1991 

Selima Chandler 1993 

Barbara Cone 1993 

Marian Cook 1991 

Shirley Drew 1993 

Marie Gavin 1992 

Barbara Grim 1991 

Russell Mahan 1992 

Ruth Morey, Chairman 1991 

Ward S. Sands 1992 

Margaretta Schraertzler, Secretary/Treasurer 1991 

Aire -Mai ja Schwann 1992 

Gloria Tinder, Vice-Chalrman (resigned) 1992 

Ruth Kramer, Coordinator 1991 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Carman, Chairman (Realtor) (deceased) 1992 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1992 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1993 

Colin Smith (District) 1991 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1993 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

John Carman, Chairman (Realtor) (deceased) 1992 

Elizabeth Corcoran (Planning Bd.) 1992 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1992 

Palmer Faran (Planning Bd.) 1991 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1993 

Colin Smith (District) 1991 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1993 

Abigail Congdon, Alternate (District) 1993 

Kim Kassner, Alternate 1991 

PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Patricia Asaff 1993 

Nelson Chu 1993 

Edward Ferri 1991 

Wendy Finnerty 1991 

William Shea 1992 

Judy Gross 1993 



15 



Term Expires 

LINCOLN ARTS LOTTERY COUNCIL 

Patricia Adams, Co-Chairman 1991 

Candace Foster 1991 

Lynn Gargill 1991 

Sandra A. Grind lay, Co -Chairman 1991 

Waleska James 1991 

Kally Kuraler 1991 

Richard Lee, Treasurer (resigned) 1991 

Wardell Loatman 1992 

Stephanie Rolfe 1992 

Lucy Sprayregen 1992 

Margaret Stathos 1992 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Richard Theriault, North Lincoln Association Representative 

(resigned) 1993 

Palmer Faran, "At Large" Representative 1991 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM AREA STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS) II 

Warren Flint, Jr., Selectmen's Appointee 
Terrence Fenton, Member at Large 
Elizabeth Corcoran, Planning Board Appointee 
Richard Theriault, HFAC Member (resigned) 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Alfred Seville 1991 

Gwendolyn des Cognets, Alternate 1991 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John Quincy Adams 1990 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William Constable 1991 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Harriet B. Todd 1991 

REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Henry Rugo 1992 

David W. Ramsay, Alternate 1992 



16 



Term Expires 
BOARD OF APPEALS 

Morton Braun 1993 

C. Russel Hansen 1990 

D'Arcy MacMahon 1989 

Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 1992 

Despena Billings 1991 

F. John Solman, Associate Member 1990 

Araalie Kass, Associate Member 1992 

CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

Henry Morgan 1992 

Jeffrey Mudge, Co-Chairman 1993 

Clare Pinto, Co-chairman 1991 

Robert Pinto 1991 

PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 



Glenn Gustavson 1939 

John Stevenson 1988 

J. Michael Tannert 1933 

Rob Webb 1989 

ROUTE 123 AREA COMMITTEE 

Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

Rollin Johnson 

John Ritsher 

Edward Schwartz 

Ann F. Sutherland Ries, Chairman 

Richard Wiggin 

BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Debra Haiduven (Recreation Director) 

Barbara Beal (Representative of Friends of the Library) 

Christel Ide (Representative of First Parish Church) 

Ruth Kramer (Council on Aging Coordinator) 

Daniel Spaeth (Representative of Lincoln Players) 

Eleanor Wilfert (Representative of the Lincoln Grange), Chairman 

Alyson A. Morse, Ex officio 

CABLE T.V. ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Jack Carver 
Gabriel Farrell 
Josephine K. Gump 
John Klobuchar 
Stephen Low, Chairman 
Nathan Parke 
Joseph Rosen 

17 



WATER MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Patrick Allen 
Richard Carroll 
Leona Champeny 
Robert DeNormandie 
Frank Emmons 
Gabriel Farrell 



AQUIFER PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Rebecca Bartovics (Water Commission's Appointee) 

Jonathan Cohen (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Palmer Faran (Planning Board Rep) 

Peter Guldberg (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Joan Kimball (Conservation Rap) 

John Kimball, Co-Chairman (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Edward Rolfe (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Tara Tracy (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Andre Vagliano, Co-Chairman (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Frank Emmons, Ex Officio 

LAND BANK STUDY COMMITTEE 



Christopher Klem 

Lois Love 

Edward Schuller, Chairman 

Kemon Taschioglou 

Lawrence Thompson 



BETHANY COMMITTEE 



James Ames 

Charlotte Barnaby 

Richard Beinecke, Ex Officio 

Richard Bennett, Ex Officio 

Robert Burnham 

Claire Cunningham 

Elizabeth Downey, Chairman 

Stephen Gray 

Lee Harrison 

Kim Kassner 

Guido Perrera 

Dorothy Smith, Ex Officio 



18 



NORTH LINCOLN MARKETING COMMITTEE 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Caroll Blake 
Lorian Brown 
Giles Browne 
Elizabeth Corcoran 
Martha DeNormandie 
Janet Frazier 
Julie Holbrook 
Polly Jackson 
Raymond Johnson 
Robert Keuhn 
Mary Helen Lorenz 
Katherine McHugh 
Ana Perez 
William Russell 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Jane Telling 
Art Tetreault 



Abigail Avery 

Dorothy Brennan 

Vicki Diadiuk 

Gwen Loud 

Enid Sichel, Chairman 

PUBLIC SAFETY STUDY COMMITTEE 

D. James Arena (Chief) 

Allen Bowles (Police Rep) 

Richard Goddard (Fire Rep) 

Edward Rolfe (At Large) 

Donald Seckler (At Large) 

Michael Tennican (Finance Committee Liaison) 

THE MATADEPERA STEERING COMMITTEE 

Joseph Greeson, Sr. 

Joseph Greeson, Jr. 

Melissa Meyer, Co-Chairman 

John Quelch 

Elizabeth Smith 

Susan Stason, Co-Chairman 

John Walker 

TOvJN WIDE CONFERENCE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Susan Brooks 

Carolyn Birmingham 

Susan Carr 

John R. Caswell, Chairman 

Rosamond Delori 

Susan Harding 

Myron Kellner-Rogers 



19 



Term Expires 
SPECIAL POLICE 

Leo Algeo, Sr. 1991 

Gary Bardsley 1991 

Raymond Barnes 1991 

John Barbetti 1991 

Dennis A. Botelho 1991 

JoAnne Carr (Conservation) 1991 

Richard Carroll 1991 

Steven G. .Carter 1991 

Joseph Cavanaugh 1991 

John Ciraso 1991 

Robert M. Collina, Jr. 1991 

Arthur Cotoni 1991 

Lorraine Dean 1991 

Peter Dewey 1991 

Renee DiCicco 1990 

Frank Domenichella 1991 

Joseph Driscoll 1991 

Neil Duane 1991 

Allison Emery 1991 

Frank Emmons 1991 

John Finnerty 1991 

Melissa Flynn (Conservation Ranger) 1991 

Richard Goddard 1991 

Frank Gordon, Jr. 1991 

Frank Gordon, Sr. 1991 

Steve Hanna (Conservation Ranger) 1991 

Donald Hodgson 1991 

Ernest Johnson 1991 

James Kane 1991 

Herbert Kelley, Jr. 1991 

John Kelly 1991 

William Kennedy 1991 

Jane Layton (Conservation) 1991 

Steven Lennon 1991 

Joseph Lenox, Sr. 1991 

Paul Lund 1991 

David Maher 1991 

Hazel Mclnnis 1991 

Richard McCarty 1991 

Susan Mead 1991 

Colin Moriarty 1991 

Robert Morrison 1991 

Michael Murphy 1991 

Robert J. O'Brien 1991 

Charles O'Loughlin 1991 

William Orpik 1991 

Theodore Poulos 1991 

Curtis A. Risley 1991 

Kenneth Rivers 1991 

Harris Roen (Conservation) 1991 

Richard Ruck 1991 

Richard Russes 1991 

Patricia Ryan 1991 

William Ryan 1991 

20 



Term Expires 

SPECIAL POLICE CONT. 

F. John Solman 1991 

Thoaas C. Spencer 1991 

Barbara J. Terrio 1991 

Richard Turcotte 1991 

Walter Van Wart 1991 

Peter Walsh 1991 

William Whalen, Jr. 1991 

William Whalen, Sr. 1991 

Eric Williams 1991 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 

ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 

Jane Barnet 1991 

Nancy Ritchie 1991 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Cynthia Bouchard 1991 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Cynthia Bouchard 1991 

Charles Doyle 1991 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

BURIAL AGENT 

Nancy J. Zuelke 1991 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Jane Barnet 1991 



21 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

Term Expires 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Robert Adkins 1991 

Lucian Leape 1993 

Bruce Long, Chairman 1991 

Joseph Robbat 1992 

Marcia A. Roehr 1993 

Peter Sugar 1992 

Agnes Wiggin 1993 

PERSONNEL BOARD 



Scott Lathrop 1991 

Samuel Donnell 1993 

Joanne Hadlock, Chairman 1992 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MINUTEMAN REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Harold Levey 1992 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 
ROADSIDE PATH COMMITTEE 



James Storer 
Sonja Johansson 
Marcia Lee 
Robert Livermore 
Rosalind Feldberg 
Mark Naiman 

LONG-RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Elizabeth Downey 1993 

Robert Jenal 1991 

Robert Lenire, Chairman 1991 

Katherine Preston 1992 

Lawrence Thompson 1992 



22 



Term Expires 

APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Mary Spindler (Moderator's Appointee) 1991 

Andrew Hall (Selectmen's Appointee) 1992 

Sherry Adams (School Committee's Appointee) 1993 

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Terence Fenton (Selectmen's Appointee), Chairman 1988 

Jonathan Hubbard (Planning Board Appointee) 1983 

Michael Kassner (Selectmen's Appointee) 1987 

Lois Love (Planning Board Appointee) 1989 

David O'Neill (Planning Board Appointee) 1989 

Robert Schudy (Selectmen's Appointee) 1987 

(Planning Board Appointee) 1988 

MINUTE MAN NATIONAL PARK COMMITTEE 

J. Quincy Adams (Conservation Commission) 
Palmer Faran (Planning Board) 
Kenneth Bassett (Planning Board) 
David O'Neil (Traffic Management) 
Terence Fenton (Traffic Management) 

WANG PROPERTIES 
SPECIAL OFFICERS 



Brian Deacy 
Scott Campbell 
Donald Driscoll 
John Friberg 
Robert Knowlton 
Robert Troy McKenna 
Ralph Robinson 
John Skerry 
Peter Vroman 

OTHER SPECIAL OFFICERS 

Minuteman Vocational High School Properties Only: Dennis Deeb 
and Randall Fox 

Audubon/Drumlin Properties Only: David Hill and Daniel Hart 

Cambridge Water Dept. Properties: Henry Manuel 

Walden Properties: William Bambury, Donald Faron, and William 
Schold 



23 



TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, and 
notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of 
appropriations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept in the Town 
Clerk's Office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town should 
communicate with the Clerk. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 24, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order in the Brooks School Auditorium on March 24, 1990 by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:40 a.m., and a quorum being 
present, (460 voters throughout the day) the following business was 
transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 26, 1990, in the 
Smith School Gymnasium, with the polls being open from 7:30 a.m. 
until 8 p.m. 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of those 
articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, copies of 
which were sent to the voters at least seven days before the Town 
Meeting. Article 8 was held out. The other articles on the Consent 
Calendar (2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 13, 15, 18, 19, 23, 23, and 31) were 
then adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 
Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 

law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That Susan Fargo be elected Measurer of Wood and Bark 

and Wendy Karaeny be elected Fence Viewer for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 

accepted. 



24 



ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 

any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 

additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 

compensation of such members. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the Town 

for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1990, and ending June 30, 1991, 

be fixed at the following amounts: 

Town Clerk $500.00 

Treasurer and Collector 10.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ two of its 
members to work on assessing duties at salaries not to exceed $25,000 
and $5,200, respectively for the said fiscal period. 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously, except where otherwise stated) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in the report of the Finance Committee, 
printed on pages 18 through 28, inclusive, of the Financial Section 
and Warrant for the 1990 Annual Town Meeting and that all items be 
raised by taxation except to the following extent and to the extent 
provided in a second motion to be made under this Article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from 
Water Department receipts and $52,000. to be taken from 
the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $6,000. to be taken from 
Conservation Commission Agency Account. 

Item 205 Animal Officer - Salary and Expense - $300. to be taken 
from the Agency Account established for fees received 
for care and custody of dogs. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $59,566. to be taken 
from METCO funds. 

Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $198. 
to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and $2,340. to 
be taken from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment 
Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $478. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 

Item 702 Cemetery - $3,500., to be taken from the Cemetery 
Improvement Fund. 



25 



Item 807 Debt Service - Flints' Fields Loan - $242,000. to be 
taken from Flints' Fields Contributions. 

Item 808 Debt Service - Interest on Flints' Fields Loan - 
$145,563. to be taken from Flints' Fields Contributions. 

Item 950- Water Department - $375,379. to be taken from 
956 Water Department receipts. 

The Total for General Purposes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1990, through June 30, 1991, is shown as $10,805,140.68, and with the 
vote under the second motion under Article 5 listed below is now 
$10,795,140.68. After the application of the special funds as listed 
above, the amount to be raised is $10,233,195.68. 

All items were voted unanimously except that items 501 - 509 were 
adopted by a majority voice vote. 

At the conclusion of action on all the articles calling for the 
expenditure of money (after Article 31), it was voted unanimously as 
follows (as a second motion under Article 5) 

VOTED: That the sum of $346,883.80 be taken from Free Cash to 

reduce the total amount to be raised by taxation, as 
voted under the first motion under this Article 5, and further, that 
the appropriation previously voted under Article 5 in Item 925 
Reserve Fund be reduced from $175,000 to $165,000. 

(This second motion was TABLED following the first vote under Article 
5 until action on Article 30 had been completed.) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under 
Article 5 of this Warrant, to provide general pay increases for 
employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sura of $15,542.94 
to the Library, and $134,457.06 to the remaining Town departments for 
the fiscal year 1991, $4,952. of which is to be taken from Water 
Department receipts and the balance of which is to be raised by 
taxation, to provide general pay increases for employees as may be 
granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library Trustees. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1990, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, 
In accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 



26 



VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to 
time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
July 1, 1990, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the 

Town's annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the 

elementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and the 

School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the 

Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at Hanscom Air 

Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to Lincoln Schools for purposes of 
education, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By majority voice vote as amended) 

That the Town vote to support the School Committee in 
its continuing plan to bring a limited number of children from Boston 
to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education, provided that, to 
foster our resolve and understanding of the program the School 
Committee, within the next three (3) months, organize a meeting of 
townspeople, parents, teachers, administrators and all interested 
parties. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by various 
departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see 
if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of 
excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $50,759., 
said sum to be taken from Free Cash, to be used to purchase vehicles 
and equipment for various departments, and to authorize the Selectmen 
to dispose by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds or any combination thereof, for the purpose of increasing the 
Lincoln Fire Department personnel by two (2) additional full-time 
firefighters, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: • (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to raise and appropriate a sura of 
$50,500. to pay for salaries and related benefits and expenses so as 
to increase the Lincoln Fire Department personnel by two (2) 
additional full-time firefighters during the fiscal year 1991. 

27 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the purposes of 
carrying out design and engineering services for repairs, renovations 
and refurbishments of the buildings under the control of the Lincoln 
School Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: To pass over this article. 

At 2:15 PM it was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to recess the 
Annual Town Meeting until the completion of two Special Town Meetings. 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 24, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Special Town Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 2:15 
p.m. and a quorum being present the following business was transacted: 

ARTICLE 1 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds or any combination thereof to pay an outstanding bill incurred 

by the School Department during Fiscal Year 1989, or take any other 

action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate a sum of $3,537.20 

from Free Cash to pay an outstanding bill incurred by the School 

Department during Fiscal Year 1989. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $33,929.50 

from Line Item 312, Interest on Temporary Loans which 
was previously voted as part of the Fiscal Year 1990 budget under 
Article 5 at the 1989 Annual Town Meeting by (i) transferring 
$23,737.50 to Line Item #820, Interest on Landfill Closure Loan for 
which no previous appropriation was made and (ii) by transferring 
$15,192.00 to Line Item #834, Interest on Permanent Transfer Station 
Loan for which no previous appropriation was made, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to transfer $38,929.50 from Line 
Item #804, Interest on Temporary Loans, which was previously voted as 
part of the Fiscal Year 1990 budget under Article 5 at the 1989 
Annual Town Meeting by (i) transferring $23,737.50 to Line Item #820, 
Interest on Landfill Closure Loan for which no previous appropriation 
was made and (ii) by transferring $15,192.00 to Line Item #834, 
Interest on Permanent Transfer Station Loan for which no previous 
appropriation was made. 



ARTICLE 3, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the replacement of 
two deteriorating stone walls located on the east side of Concord 
Road south of South Great Road and on the east side of Lincoln Road 
across from the Old Town Kail, said deteriorating stone walls to be 
replaced with sloping embankments and for the acquisition by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise of such easement or other 
rights as may be necessary to construct and/or maintain such 
embankments, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

At the completion of Article 3 it was moved, seconded and unanimously 
voted to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 2:24 p.m. 



WARRANT FOR A SECOND SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 24, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Second Special Town Meeting 
was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 2:24 
p.m. and a quorum being present the following business was transacted: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for various capital 
improvements, renovations and repairs to the Town's school buildings 
and for design and engineering services relating to any approved or 
proposed capital improvements, renovations and repairs to such 
buildings, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate $83,320. from Free 
Cash for various capital improvements, renovations and repairs to the 
Town's school buildings and for design and engineering services 
relating to any approved or proposed capital improvements, 
renovations and repairs to such buildings. 

At the completion of Article 1 it was moved, seconded and unanimously 
voted to dissolve the Second Special Town Meeting at 2:35 p.m. The 
Annual Town Meeting was reconvened and the following business 
transacted. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the design, 
purchase and installation of a stand-by power source for the Sandy 
Pond Pump Station, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $60,000., 
said sura to be taken from Water Department receipts, to be used for 
the design, purchase and installation of a stand-by power source for 
the Sandy Pond Pump Station. 



29 



ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sura of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 
conducting prolonged pumping tests at the Codman North site as 
required by the Department of Environmental Protection for approval 
of a new well for municipal water supply, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $90,000. 
from Water Department receipts for the purpose of conducting 
prolonged pumping tests at the Codman North site as required by the 
Department of Environmental Protection for the approval of a new well 
for municipal water supply. 

ARTICLE 15'. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and 

maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED; (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate by taxation the sura 

of $35,000. to be used for the repair and maintenance of certain Town 

buildings. 

ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said sura to be used 

for construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of 

the Town's roads, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $50,000. 

from Free Cash for the construction, reconstruction and/or 

maintenance and repair of the Town's roads. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw 
by: 

(i) deleting the reference to residential site plans 
and residential buildings, structures or uses appearing 
at the beginning of Section 17 thereof, and 
(ii) deleting Section 17A thereof in Its entirety, 

in order that the standards and procedures for site plans currently 
set forth in Section 17 shall uniformly apply as to each and every 
use or district for which site plan approval is required by the 
Zoning Bylaw. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw in the 
following manner: 

(i) By deleting at the beginning of Section 17 thereof the 

following preamble statement: 

"Residential Site Plans . This Section 17 shall apply 

only to residential buildings, structures or uses"; and 
(ii) By deleting Section 17A thereof in its entirety, 

all in order that the standards and procedures for site plans 
currently set forth in Section 17 shall uniformly apply as to each 
and every use or district for which site plan approval is required by 
the Zoning Bylaw. 

30 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw 

by making a number of technical corrections to various 
sections, a complete list of which is available for inspection at the 
Town Offices and in the Office of the Town Clerk, or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw by making 
a number of technical corrections to various sections, a complete 
list of which is available for inspection at the Town Offices and in 
the office of the Town Clerk, and a copy of which has been 
distributed to all persons at this meeting. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 

borrowing or any combination thereof to be used for the construction, 

reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of roads and bridges, 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof in order to supplement 
$15,000. previously appropriated from Free Cash under Article 19 of 
the Warrant of the 1933 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of 
conducting a study of the structural integrity, heating and 
electrical systems, space utilization and similar aspects of the 
Town's Public Safety 3uilding, said funds to be used to cover the 
increased costs of undertaking the aforementioned study, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $5,000. 
from Free Cash, in order to supplement $15,000. previously 
appropriated from Free Cash under Article 19 of the Warrant of the 
1988 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of conducting a study of the 
structural integrity, heating and electrical systems, space 
utilization and similar aspects of the Town's Public Safety Building, 
said funds to be used to cover the increased costs of undertaking the 
aforementioned study. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer of available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the replacement of 
two deteriorating stone walls located on the east side of Concord 
Road south of South Great Road and on the east . side of Lincoln Road 
across from the Old Town Hall, said deteriorating stone walls to be 
replaced with sloping embankments to be maintained by the Town 
pursuant to the necessary easements, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate $15,000. from Free 
cash for the replacement of two deteriorating stone walls located on 
the east side of Concord Road south of South Great Road and on the 
east side of Lincoln Road across from the Old Town Hall, said 
deteriorating stone walls to be replaced with sloping embankments, 
which are to be maintained by the Town pursuant to easements granted 
without consideration to the Town by abutting landowners. 

31 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to approve amendments to 

the bylaws of the DeCordova and Dana Museum & Park 
which have been adopted by the Corporation, removing the requirement 
of Lincoln residency for members of the Corporation, increasing the 
maximum size of the Board of Trustees of the Museum and making 
certain other administrative changes relating to the office of vice 
president, a copy of which amendments are on file with the Town 
Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to approve amendments to the bylaws 
of the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park which have been adopted by 
the Corporation, so as to remove the requirement of Lincoln residency 
for members of the Corporation, increase the maximum size of the 
Board of Trustees of the Museum and make certain other administrative 
changes relating to the office of vice president, a copy of which 
amendments are on file with the Town Clerk and have been distributed 
to all persons at this meeting. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 

from Public Works salaries, for which an appropriation 
by taxation was previously voted as part of the FY 1990 Budget under 
Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting, to Water 
Department salaries, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 
To pass over. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 

providing a one-day, Town-wide hazardous waste collection, or take 

any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate $25,000. from Free 

Cash for the purpose of providing a one day, Town-wide hazardous 

waste collection. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$76,593. from available funds to pay for that portion of 
the FY90 debt service which was incurred by the purchase of the Flint 
Field parcels under Articles 18 and 19 of the Warrant of the 1939 
Annual Town Meeting and which has not yet been appropriated, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to accept $75,593. in contributions 
received from the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust and to appropriate 
said amount to pay for that portion of the FY90 debt service which 
was incurred by the purchase of the Flint Field parcels under 
Articles 18 and 19 of the Warrant of the 1939 Annual Town Meeting and 
which has not yet been appropriated. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General 

Bylaws by adding a new Section 14 entitled Water Supply 
Bylaw to Article IX, to provide the Water Commissioners with 
authority to enforce mandatory restrictions in the event of a water 
emergency, a copy of the text of which proposed Section 14 of Article 
IX is on file with the Town Clerk, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

32 



VOTED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to amend its General Bylaws by 
adding a new Section 14 to Article IX thereof, to provide the Water 
Commissioners with authority to enforce mandatory restrictions in the 
event of a water emergency, a copy of the text of which proposed 
Section 14 of Article IX has been filed with the Town Clerk and has 
been distributed to all persons at this meeting. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to obtain engineering 

or other consultant services for a feasibility study for water 

treatment facilities at Flint's Pond, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $30,000. 

from Water Department receipts for a feasibility study for water 

treatment facilities at Flint's Pond. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof in order to supplement 
$7,000. previously appropriated from Free Cash under Article 20 of 
the Warrant of the 1983 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of 
purchasing emergency pre-emption devices to allow Lincoln's emergency 
vehicles to control the intersection at Route 2 and Bedford Road, 
said supplemental funds to be used in conjunction with such original 
appropriation to equip all of Lincoln's emergency vehicles with 
emergency pre-emption devices, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $10,500. from Free 
Cash in order to supplement $7,000. previously appropriated from Free 
Cash under Article 20 of the Warrant of the 1983 Annual Town Meeting 
for the purpose of purchasing emergency pre-emption devices to allow 
Lincoln's emergency vehicles to control the intersection at Route 2 
and Bedford Road, said supplemental funds to be used in conjunction 
with such original appropriation to equip all of Lincoln's emergency 
vehicles with emergency pre-emption devices. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said sum to be used 
for the cost of aerial mosquito spraying in known breeding areas, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By a standing vote of 109 in favor, 107 opposed) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sura of $10,000. 
from Free Cash to be used for the cost of aerial mosquito spraying in 
known breeding areas subject to review by the Board of Health, 
Conservation Commission, Water Commission and Board of Selectmen. 



33 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Tovm will vote to authorize the granting 

to the National Park Service of an easement or similar 
right of access or use over (i) a portion of a certain parcel of land 
now held by the Town for conservation or open space purposes, 
situated off Hanscom Drive and Old Bedford Road and lying northeast 
of the northeasterly boundary of the Minuteraan National Historical 
Park, as shown on a plan of land filed with the Town Clerk, or (ii) a 
portion of a certain parcel of land now held by the Town for 
municipal purposes and currently being used as the Town's refuse 
disposal area, situated off Route 2A and Mill Street and also 
abutting the Mtnuteman National Historical Park, as shown on a plan 
of land also filed with the Town Clerk, with the precise boundaries 
of such easement, access or use area over either of the aforesaid 
parcels to be determined in the manner authorized by Town Meeting, in 
consideration of the granting to the Town of an easement or similar 
right of access over land now owned by the National Park Service and 
being part of the Minuteman National Historical Park on North Great 
Road, which land and proposed easement or access area is shown on a 
plan of land filed with the Town Clerk, in order to provide access to 
the Town's refuse diposal area; and to authorize, if necessary, the 
filing of a petition in the General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts seeking enactment of a law authorizing the granting by 
the Town of such easement or access rights as contemplated hereby; or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED; (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
acting in the name of the Town, to grant to the National Park Service 
an easement or similar right of access or use, or restriction of use, 
for the benefit of the Minuteraan National Historical Park, over a 
portion of a certain parcel of land now held by the Town for refuse 
disposal purposes, situated off Route 2A and Mill Street and also 
abutting the Minuteman National Historical Park, all as shown on a 
plan of land entitled "Assessor's Map - Town of Lincoln Refuse 
Disposal Area" and filed with the Town Clerk, with the precise 
duration and terms of such easement, right or restriction and the 
precise boundaries of such easement, use or restriction area over a 
portion of the aforesaid parcel to be determined by the Board of 
Selectmen, all in consideration of the granting to the Town of an 
easement or similar right of access acceptable to the Board of 
Selectmen over land now owned by the National Park Service and being 
part of the Minuteman National Historical Park on North Great Road, 
which land and proposed easement or access area is shown on a plan of 
land entitled "Assessor's Map - Town of Lincoln Refuse Disposal Area" 
and filed with the Town Clerk, in order to provide legal and improved 
access to the Town's refuse disposal area. 

ART ECLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Middlesex 

County Retirement Board to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 32, Section 22D of the Massachusetts General Laws as added by 
the Acts of 1987, Chapter 697, Section 76, whereby the County will 
establish a pension funding system and qualify for state pension 
funding grants, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 
To Pass Over. 



34 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money from Free Cash to the Fiscal Year 1990 Reserve 
Fund for the purpose of replacing amounts previously disbursed from 
said Fund for certain expenses associated with the emergency 
replacement of the Town Offices boiler and burner, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to forward the following 

resolution to the State and Federal representatives of 
the Town: 

"Be it resolved that military spending should be reduced 
substantially in the immediate future, and funds shifted to 
meeting human needs including education, to the protection of 
the environment, and to the reduction of the deficit.", 

or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By a majority voice vote) 

That the Town vote to forward the following resolution 
to the State and Federal representatives of the Town: 

"Be it resolved that military spending should be reduced 
substantially In the immediate future, and funds shifted to 
conversion of military to peace time activities, and to meeting 
human needs including education, to the protection of the 
environment, and to the reduction of the deficit." 

ARTICLE 34. To see whether the Town will vote to recommend 

rescindment of a rider on a congressional bill, passed 
in 1985, which would permit unregulated dumping throughout the United 
States of 1/3 of the Nation's low-level, radioactive waste, and to so 
inform the Massachusetts General Court, the Congress of the United 
States, the Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to recommend rescindment of a rider 
on a congressional bill, passed in 1985, which would permit 
unregulated dumping throughout the United States of 1/3 of the 
Nation's low-level, radioactive waste, and to so inform the 
Massachusetts General Court, the Congress of the United States, the 
Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 

At various stages of the Meeting, tribute was paid to several 
retiring officers as follows: 

Susan Fargo retiring from the Board of Selectmen after 6 years. 

Quincy Adams retiring from the Conservation Commission after 

twenty-nine years. 

Wendy Kameny retiring from the School Committee after 3 years. 

David Pettit of Sudbury retiring from the Regional District 

School Committee after 3 years. 

Tribute was also paid to long time resident and international 

businessman, An Wang who died that morning. 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously voted to dissolve the Meeting at 6:25 
p.m. 

35 



ANNUAL TOW:i ELECTION 
March 26, 1990 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the Polls were opened at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy J. 
Zuelke. The following Wardens assisted Mrs. Zuelke throughout the 
day: Peggy Elliott, Eugenia Flint, Robert Kelleher, William Langton, 
Arnold MacLean, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert, Fred Wilfert, 
Laurence Zuelke. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The 
total number of registered voters in Lincoln for this election was 
3180. The total number of votes were as follows: There was a total 
vote of 1215; with 326 in Precinct 1 and 890 in Precinct 2, with the 
following results: 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Town Moderator 


David M. Donaldson 


271 


762 


1033 


(3 yrs) 


Blanks 


55 


128 


183 






326 ' 


890 


1216 


Town Clerk (1 yr) 


Nancy J. Zuelke 


280 


787 


1067 




Blanks 


45 


103 


149 






325 


890 


1216 


Board of Selectmen 


Richard P. Carroll 


111 


252 


363 


(3 yrs.) 


Katherine S. McHugh 


194 


589 


783 




Blanks 


21 
326 - 


49 
890 


70 
1215 


Town Treasurer 


Roy M. Raja 


92 


229 


321 


(1 yr.) 


George C. Hibben 


213 


617 


830 




Blanks 


21 
326 


44 

890 


65 
1215 


Board of Assessors 


Douglas M. Burkett 


254 


716 


970 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


72 


174 


246 






326 


890 


1216 


School Committee 


Sarah Bobbitt 


54 


139 


193 


(2) (3 yrs.) 


Maria Churchill 


224 


535 


759 




Elizabeth Lerman 


83 


295 


378 




Leslie Vagliano 


246 


655 


901 




Blanks 


45 


156 


201 






552 


1780 


2432 


Water Commissioner 


Leona G. Champeny 


255 


720 


975 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


71 


170 


241 






326 


890 


1216 


Board of Health 


Perry J. Culver 


270 


758 


1028 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


56 


132 


188 






326 


890 


1216 


Cemetery 


Marjorie Holland 


250 


734 


984 


Commissioner 
(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


76 

326 


156 
890 


232 
1216 



36 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. ] 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Planning Board 
(5 yrs.) 


Marjorie P. Faran 
Blanks 


24S 

78 

326 


708 
182 
890 


956 

260 
1216 


Commissioner of 
Trust Funds 
(3 yrs.) 


William B. Russell 
Blanks 


267 

59 

326 


726 

164 
890 


993 

223 

1216 


Trustee of Bemis 
Fund (3 yrs.) 


John Curtis Perry 
Blanks 


259 

61 

326 


719 
147 
890 


978 

238 

1215 


Trustee DeCordova 
Museum (4 yrs.) 


John B. French 
Blanks 


265 

67 

326 


743 
171 
890 


1003 

208 

1215 


Recreation 
Committee 
(3 yrs.) 


Elizabeth Evans 
Blanks 


254 

72 

326 


706 

184 
890 


960 

256 

1216 


Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional H.S. 
(2) (3 yrs.) 


Phyllis Rappaport 
Frederick Pryor 
Blanks 


257 
152 
243 
652 


718 

430 

632 

1780 


975 

532 

875 

2432 



Question 1 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess 
an additional £400,000 in real estate and 
personal property taxes for the purpose of 
funding the Town's operating expenses for the 
fiscal year beginning July first, nineteen 
hundred and ninety?" 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



197 

115 

14 

326 



557 

290 

43 

890 



754 

405 

57 

1216 



37 



SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY 
April 3, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Peggy Elliott, Eugenia 
Flint, Allan Greaves, Robert Kelleher, William Langton, Arnold 
MacLean, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert, Fred Wilfert. The 
Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total 
number of registered voters in Lincoln for this election was 3176. 
The total number of votes cast was 376, which was divided as 
follows: Precinct 1: Republican - 63, Democratic - 31, for a total 
of 94; Precinct 2: Republican - 162, Democratic - 120, for a total 
of 282. 



Office 



Republican 
Candidate 



Prec 



Prec. 2 Total 



Senator in Gen. Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 60 

Ct. (5th Middlesex) Markham H. Lyons 1 

Blanks _2 

63 



156 


216 


6 


7 





2 


162 


225 



Democratic 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec. 1 -Prec. 2 Total 



Senator in General 
Ct. (5th Middlesex) 



Joseph W, 
Robert J. 
Blanks 



Mullin 
Waddick 



29 

1 

1 

31 



102 

14 

4 

120 



131 
15 

5 
151 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 
May 1, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assited throughout 
the day by the following wardens: Peggy Elliott, Eugenia Flint, 
William Langton, Arnold MacLean, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor 
Wilfert, Fred Wilfert, Laurence Zuelke. The Polls were declared 
closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number of registered 
voters in Lincoln for this election was 3197. The total number of 
votes were as follows: there was a total vote of 936, with 234 in 
Precinct 1 and 702 in Precinct 2, with the following results: 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 



Senator in General Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 180 
Ct. (5th Middlesex) Joseph W. Mullin 51 

Blanks 3 

237 



7 


697 


1 


232 


4 


7 


12 


"536 



38 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 18, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Peggy Elliott, MaryAnn 
Greaves, Robert Kelleher, William Langton, Elizabeth Snelling, 
Eleanor Wilfert, Fred Wilfert, Laurence Zuelke. The Polls were 
declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number of 
registered voters in Lincoln for this election was 3257. The total 
number of votes cast was 2034, which was divided as follows: 
Precinct 1: Republican - 259, Democratic - 332, for a total of 591; 
Precinct 2: Republican - 656, Deraocratric - 787 for a total of 1443, 
with the following results: 





Republican 








Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Senator in Congress 


Daniel W. Daly 
Jim Rappaport 
Blanks 


41 
185 

33 
259 


146 

431 

79 

656 


137 
616 
112 
915 


Governor 


Steven D. Pierce 
William F. Weld 
Blanks 


56 

198 

5 

259 


124 
525 

7 
656 


180 

723 

12 

915 


Lieutenant Governor 


Argeo Paul Cellucci 
Peter G. Torkildsen 
Blanks 


169 
55 
35 

259 


438 

146 

72 

656 


607 
201 
107 
915 


Attorney General 


Guy A. Carbone 
William C. Sawyer 
Blanks 


79 
132 

48 
259 


182 
335 
139 
656 


261 
467 
187 
915 


Secretary of State 


Paul McCarthy 
Blanks 


179 

80 

259 


438 
218 
656 


617 
293 
915 


Treasurer 


Joseph D. Malone 
Blanks 


197 

62 

259 


494 
162 
656 


691 
224 
915 


Auditor 


Douglas J. Murray 
Blanks 


172 

87 

259 


425 
231 
656 


597 

318 
915 


Representative in 
Congress (5th 
District) 


Donald T. Coleman 
John F. MacGovern 
Blanks 


43 
134 

82 
259 


114 
340 
202 
656 


157 
474 
284 
915 



39 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Councillor (3rd 
Dist.) 


Thomas F Healy 
Blanks 


174 

85 

259 


415 
241 
656 


589 
326 
915 


Senator in General 
Ct. (5th Middlesex 
Dist.) 


Lucile "Cile" Hicks 
Blanks 


215 

44 

259 


523 
133 
656 


738 
177 
915 


Representative in 
Gen. Ct. (15th 
Middlesex Dist.) 


Robert N. Cohen 
Blanks 


184 

75 

259 


447 
209 
656 


631 

284 
915 


Register of Probate 


Donna M. Lambert 
Blanks 


175 

84 

259 


419 
237 
656 


594 
321 
915 


County Treasurer 


Walter Fish 
Blanks 

Democratic 


169 

90 
259 


409 
247 
656 


578 
337 
915 


Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Senator in Congress 


John F. Kerry 
31anks 


193 
139 
332 


566 
221 
787 


759 

360 

1119 


Governor 


Francis X. Bellotti 
Evelyn F. Murphy 
John Silber 
Scattering 
Blanks 


123 
10 

180 



19 

332 


369 
36 

342 

3 

37 

787 


492 

46 

522 

3 

56 

1119 


Lieutenant Governor 


Marjorie Clapprood 
William Golden 
Nicholas Paleologos 
Blanks 


157 
79 
39 
57 

332 


425 
163 
75 
124 
787 


582 
242 
114 
181 
1119 


Attorney General 


James Shannon 

L. Scott Harshbarger 

Blanks 


102 

201 

29 

332 


259 
165 
363 
737 


361 

366 

392 

1119 


Secretary of State 


Michael J. Connolly 
Blanks 


182 
150 
332 


421 
366 
787 


603 

516 

1119 


Treasurer 


William F. Galvin 
George Keverian 
Dick Kraus 
Blanks 


102 
87 
88 
55 

332 


215 
216 
213 
143 
787 


317 
303 
301 
198 
1119 



40 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec 



Prec. 2 Total 



Auditor 



A. Joseph DeNucci 
Blanks 



Representative in Chester G. Atkins 
Congress (5th Dist.) Blanks 



Councillor (3rd 
Dist.) 



Robert B. Kennedy 
Edward F. Flood 
Blanks 



Senator in Gen. Bryan P. McCarthy 
Ct. (5th District) Blanks 



Representative in 
Gen. Ct. (15th 
Middlesex Dist.) 

District Attorney 



Stephen W. Doran 
Blanks 



Joseph K. Mackey 

Thomas F. Reilly 

George W. Spartichino 
Blanks 



Register of Probate Thomas J. Larkin 
Joseph L. Bradley 
Blanks 



County Treasurer 



James E. Fahey, Jr. 
Warren McManus 
Kevin J. Palmer 
Blanks 



County Commissioner Bill Schmidt 
(Middlesex County) Barbara Collins 
William Eckland 
Francis Flaherty 
William McFarland 
Blanks 



183 
149 
332 

223 

109 
332 

127 

99 

106 

332 

155 
177 
332 

194 
138 
332 

86 

101 

52 

93 

332 

160 

53 

119 

332 

92 

48 

43 

149 

332 

67 
34 
27 
54 
23 
127 
332 



420 
367 



603 
516 



787 


1119 


596 


819 


191 


300 


787 


1119 


245 


372 


263 


362 


279 


385 


787 


1119 


381 


536 


406 


583 


787 


1119 


462 


656 


325 


463 


787 


1119 


190 


276 


275 


376 


80 


132 


242 
787 


335 
1119 


394 


554 


110 


163 


283 


402 


787 


1119 


193 


285 


99 


147 


95 


133 


400 
787 


549 
1119 


201 


263 


91 


125 


61 


88 


49 


103 


48 


71 


337 


464 



787 



1119 



41 



STATE ELECTION 
November 6, 1990 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Thomas Coan, Peggy 
Elliott, Eugenia Flint, Allan Greaves, MaryAnn Greaves, Robert 
Kelleher, Elizabeth Snelling, Harriet Todd, Fred Wilfert, Laurence 
Zuelke. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. 
Zuelke. The total number of votes cast was 2871, with 863 in 
Precinct 1 • and 2008 in Precinct 2. Total number of registered 
voters was 3400. Results are as follows: 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. : 


L Prec. 2 


Total 


Senator in Congress 


John F. Kerry 


486 


1226 


1712 




Jim Rappaport 


331 


644 


975 




Blanks 


46 


138 


184 






863 


2008 


2371 


Governor & Lt. 


Silber & Clapprood 


278 


621 


899 


Governor 


Weld & Cellucci 


529 


1255 


1784 




Umina & DeBarry 


20 


40 


60 




Scattering 


2 


5 


7 




Blanks 


34 


87 


121 






863 


2008 


2871 


Attorney General 


L. Scott Harshbarger 


513 


1334 


1847 




William C. Sawyer 


304 


572 


876 




Blanks 


46 


102 


148 






863 


2008 


2871 


Secretary of State 


Michael J. Connolly 


290 


714 


1004 




Paul McCarthy 


344 


709 


1053 




Barbara F. Ahearn 


146 


376 


522 




Blanks 


83 


209 


292 






863 


2003 


2871 


Treasurer 


William F. Galvin 


200 


475 


675 




Joseph D. Malone 


553 


1269 


1822 




C. David Nash 


57 


112 


169 




Scattering 


1 




1 




Blanks 


52 


152 


204 






863 


2008 


2871 


Auditor 


A. Joseph DeNucci 


333 


894 


1277 




Douglas J. Murray 


322 


695 


1017 




Steven K. Sherman 


64 


165 


229 




Blanks 


94 


254 


343 






863 


2008 


2871 


Representative in 


Chester G. Atkins 


486 


1280 


1766 


Congress (5th Dist.) 


John F. MacGovern 


346 


647 


993 




Blanks 


31 


81 


112 






863 


2008 


2871 



42 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. : 


L Prec. 2 


Total 


Councillor (3rd 


Robert B. Kennedy 


263 


628 


891 


Dist.) 


Thomas F. Healy 


478 


1044 


1522 




Blanks 


122 


336 


453 






863 


2008 


2871 


Senator in Gen. Ct. 


Lucile "Cile" Hicks 


611 


1465 


2076 


(5th Middlesex 


Bryan P. McCarthy 


172 


363 


535 


Dist.) 


Blanks 


80 


180 


260 






863 


2008 


2871 


Representative in 


Stephen W. Doran 


334 


851 


1185 


Gen. Ct. (15th 


Robert N. Cohen 


435 


917 


1352 


Middlesex Dist.) 


Blanks 


94 


240 


334 






853 


2008 


2871 


District Attorney 


Thomas F. Reilly 


506 


1183 


1689 


(Northern District) 


Blanks 


357 


82 5 


1182 






863 


2008 


2871 


Registrar of Probate 


Donna M. Lambert 


413 


932 


1345 


(Middlesex County) 


Thomas J. Larkin 


293 


723 


1015 




Blanks 


157 


353 


510 






363 


2008 


2371 


County Treasurer 


James E. Fahey, Jr. 


255 


595 


850 


(Middlesex County) 


Walter Fish 


410 


953 


1363 




Blanks 


198 


460 


658 






863 


2008 


2871 


County Commissioner 


Francis X. Flaherty 


468 


1071 


1539 


(Middlesex County) 


Blanks 


395 


937 


1332 






863 


2008 


2871 



Question 1 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 



Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment 
to the constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions 
of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
on December 17, 1987 by a vote of 180 to 6, and 
on June 11, 1990 by a vote of 186 to 6? 



43 



SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment would 
repeal the constitutional provision that a 
state census be taken and used as the basis for 
determining state representative, senatorial 
and councillor districts. The proposed 
constitutional amendment would provide that the 
federal census shall be the basis for 
determining such districts. 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 737 1660 2397 

No 89 244 333 

Blanks _37 104 141 

863 2008 2871 

Question 2 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on 
which no vote was taken by the Senate or House 
of Representatives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would place restrictions on 
the State's use of consultants. It would place 
various limits on the amount of profit, 
overhead charges and expenses that the State 
could pay consultants. It would limit the 
duration of consultant contracts to two years 
and any extension to one year, and it would 
limit the degree to which such contracts could 
be changed to require payments in excess of the 
original contract. The proposed law would 
limit to $100,000 the amount the State could 
pay on a consultant contract with an individual 
and would require all other consultant 
contracts in excess of $25,000 to be sought 
through competitive bidding. It would prohibit 
consultants from supervising State employees, 
and it would limit the use of consultants as 
substitutes for State employee positions. In 
addition, the proposed law would place limits 
on the total amount of money State agencies, 
departments and Authorities could spend on 
consultants each year. Subsidiary provisions 
would also establish a method for these 
entities to gradually come into compliance with 
the new spending limits and would give 
authority to the State Secretary of 
Administration and Finance, on request, to 
permit some spending in excess of the new 
limits. The proposed law would also require 
State agencies, departments and authorities as 

44 



well as the Secretary of Administration and 
Finance to submit yearly reports concerning the 
State's consultant contracts to certain 
legislative committees and to the Inspector 
General. 

Finally, the proposed law provides that any of 
its provisions, if found by a court to be 
unconstitutional or otherwise unlawful, would 
be severed from the law and the remaining 
provisions would continue in effect. 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



302 


573 


875 


539 


1369 


1908 


22 
863 


66 
2003 


83 
2371 



Question 3 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on 
which no vote was taken by the Senate or the 
House of Representatives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state income 
tax rate, affect language contained in certain 
tax provisions, and regulate the setting of 
fees by state agencies and authorities. 

The proposed law would set the state income tax 
rate on Part B taxable income (in general, 
earned income) at 4.25% for 1991 and 4.625% for 
1992, except for income from unemployment 
compensation, alimony, Massachusetts bank 
interest, rental income, pension and annuity 
income, and IRA/Keogh deductions, which would 
be taxed at 5%. 

The proposed law also provides that the fee 
imposed by any state agency or authority shall 
be no more than the fee that was in effect on 
or before June 30, 1988. The State Secretary 
of Administration would determine the amount to 
be charged for any service, registration, 
regulation, license, fee, permit or other 
public function, except for the rates of 
tuition or fees at state colleges and 
universities or any fees or charges relative to 
the administration and operation of the state 
courts. Any increase or decrease in a fee, or 
the establishment of any new fee, would require 
the approval of the Legislature. Any Increase 
in a fee would not apply to persons 65 years of 

45 



age or older. No state agency or authority 
could collect any fee which exceeds the 
administrative costs directly incurred by the 
state agency or authority to produce and 
process the application for any license or 
permit. The Secretary of Administration must 
report information concerning fees to the 
Legislature on an annual basis. 

The proposed law provides that for tax periods 
commencing on or after January 1, 1991, 
language in certain provisions of the 
Massachusetts General Laws relating to taxes 
shall be the same as it was on August 2, 1989, 
or the effective date of the proposed law, 
whichever language yields less tax revenue. 
The tax provisions affected include sections 
relating to the surtax on business income, 
corporate excise taxes, S corporation taxes, 
taxes on security corporations, taxes on Part A 
income (in general, unearned income), bank 
taxes, excise taxes on alcoholic beverages and 
cigarettes, excise taxes on deeds, estate taxes 
payments to the Commonwealth relating to horse 
and dog racing, payments to the Commonwealth 
relating to boxing and sparring matches, taxes 
on utility companies, gasoline taxes, taxes on 
insurance companies, excise taxes on motor 
vehicles, taxes on urban redevelopment 
corporations, sales tax, use tax, room 
occupancy excise tax, property taxes, and taxes 
on proceeds from raffles and bazaars. 

The proposed law also contains a provision that 
if any sections of the law are held to be 
invalid, all other sections of the law are to 
remain in effect . 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 345 683 1028 

No 501 1232 1783 

Blanks 17 _43 __60 

863 2008 2371 









46 



LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on 
which no vote was taken by the Senate or House 
of Representatives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state 
election laws governing the establishment of 
political parties and the nomination of 
candidates. 

The proposed law would allow voters to register 
under a political designation other than 
"Independent" and in addition to the two 
political parties previously recognized by law 
(Republican or Democrat), if at least fifty 
voters request to be permitted to do so. It 
would allow any group to qualify as a political 
party under Massachusetts law if at least one 
percent of the total number of registered 
voters register to vote using that group's 
political designation, or if at least three 
percent of the votes cast at the preceding 
election for any statewide office were cast for 
a candidate running under that group's 
political designation. 

The proposed law would set the minimum number 
of signatures needed on independent or minor 
party nomination papers for state office at 
one-half of one percent (1/2%) of the entire 
vote cast in the previous state election for 
governor (as compared to 2% as of 1989), and 
would also establish this number of signatures 
as the upper limit needed for major party 
candidates. The proposed law would also permit 
voters to sign the nomination papers of any 
number of candidates for the same office, would 
require that all blank forms to be used for 
nomination papers and initiative and referendum 
petitions be no more than 8 1/2" by 14" in 
size, and would allow signatures to be 
collected on exact copies of those forms. 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 481 1082 1563 

No 334 791 1125 

Blanks _48 135 183 

863 2008 2371 



47 



Question 5 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on 
which no vote was taken by the Senate or the 
House of Representatives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would regulate the 
distribution to cities and towns of the Local 
Aid Fund, which consists of at least 40% of the 
revenue generated by the state income, sales, 
and corporate taxes, as well as the balance of 
the State Lottery Fund. 

Subject to appropriation by the Legislature, 
the State Treasurer would distribute the Local 
Aid Fund to cities and towns on a quarterly 
basis, and each city or town would receive at 
least the same amount of local aid it received 
in the previous fiscal year unless the total 
Local Aid Fund decreases. 

In fiscal year 1992, if there has been any 
increase over the fiscal year 1939 fund, half 
of the increase would be distributed in 
accordance with the distribution formula used 
for fiscal year 1989, and half would be 
distributed to each city and town in proportion 
to its population. 

In each year after 1992, if the fund increases, 
the excess would be distributed through a 
formula devised by the State Secretary of 
Administration and Finance, with the advice and 
consent of the Local Government Advisory 
Committee. If the fund decreases after 1992, 
each town or city will have the amount it 
receives decreased by the same percentage. 

This proposed law also requires that the 
Treasurer publish an annual report about the 
Local Aid Fund, that the State Auditor publish 
an annual audit of the Account, and that the 
Secretary of Administration and Finance Issue 
to each city and town an estimate of funds it 
will receive from the Local Aid Fund. 



48 



Each city or town would be allowed to bring a 
lawsuit to force distribution of the account, 
and would be entitled to a late payment fee if 
distribution is not timely. 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 373 731 1104 

No 442 1151 1593 

Blanks _48 126 174 

863 2003 2371 

Question 6 THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall radio and television broadcast outlets be 
required to give free and equal time to all 
certified candidates for public office in the 
commonwealth? 

Prec, 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 461 1072 1533 

No 316 707 1023 

Blanks _86 229 315 

863 2008 2371 

Question 7 Shall Middlesex County elect to transfer to the 

Commonwealth all right, title and interest held 
by said county in: 

A. The Superior Court House building and land 
in Lowell, Massachusetts 

B. The Superior Court House building and land 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts 

C. The Probate Court/Registry of Deeds 
building and land in Cambridge, Massachusetts 
occupied by the judicial branch and owned by 
the county? 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 

Yes 351 806 1157 

No 303 672 975 

Blanks 209 530 739 

863 2008 2871 



49 



Finance 



OFFICE OF THE TREASURER 

George C. Hibben, Treasurer 

Cynthia Bouchard, Assistant Treasurer 



A downturn in the New England industry and real estate signaled 
trouble within the banking system. The financial stability of banks 
in which Lincoln funds were deposited was carefully monitored. In 
February 1990 deposits in the Bank of New England were reduced and 
held below the FDIC insurance limits. Deposits were increased with 
the Massachusetts Municipal Depository Trust (MMDT), a money market 
fund managed by Fidelity Management & Research Company. 

Interest earned on deposits remained historically high during the 
year. The average annual rates of the MMDT moved from 9.15% in July 
1939 to 8.02% in June 1990. 

Placement of Trust Fund investment instruments in a custodian 

account in July 1989 reduced our clerical work and facilitated 

monthly and year end reporting to the Commissioners of Trust Funds 
and Fund Trustees. 

State aid and reimbursement payments were often late and in some 
cases reduced. The foresight of the Finance Committee and the 
Executive Secretary compensated for these events in the budgetary 
process. Therefore, no borrowing was necessary to maintain town 
services. Funds for the Flint's Fields purchase were obtained by 
bonding with the initial principal and Interest payments provided by 
community contributions. 

Focus on the coming fiscal year will be on safety, liquidity and 
income of Lincoln deposits - in this order. Possible recession and 
lower interest rates, and continued instability in the banking 
industry will present daily challenges to this office. 



50 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1990 

60,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.65%, due $20,000 each 

April 1, 1991-93, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of 

the G. L. 
40,000 Energy Conservation Loan, 7.802 due $20,000 each Dec. 1, 

1990-91, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G. L. 
600,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.25%, due $150,000 each April 

1, 1991-94, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G. L. 
40,000 Codman Housing Loan, 7.25%, due $10,000 each April 1, 

1991-94, issued under Ch. 359, Acts of 1979 of the G.L. 
375,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.60%, due $75,000 each Nov. 15, 

1990-94, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G.L. 
3,020,000 General Obligation Bonds, 5.7696%, due $400,000 each 

March 15, 1991-96, and due $370,000 March 15, 1997, and 

due $250,000 March 15, 1998, issued under Ch. 44, S. 

7(3) and (3A) and 7(25), and Ch. 359 of the Acts of 

1979, S. 3 of the G.L. 
35,000 Highway Sweeper Loan, 6.25%, due $15,000 April 15, 1991, 

and due $10,000 each April 15, 1992-93, issued under 

Ch. 44, S. ?(9). 
3,650,000 General Obligation Bonds, 6.3481%, due $365,000 each 

Nov. 15, 1990-99, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3), 

S. 8(22), and S. 8(24) of the G.L. 



7,820,000 TOTAL MUNICIPAL LOANS 



7,820,000 NET DEBT 



25,000 Water Loan, 5.20%, due $15,000 August 1, 1990, and due 
$10,000 Aug. 1, 1991, issued under Ch. 44, S. 8(5). 
400,000 Water Loan, 7.80%, due $80,000 each Dec. 1, 1990-94. 



425,000 TOTAL WATER BONDS 



8,245,000 TOTAL DEBT (BONDED) 



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61 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Robert L. Jenal 

Paul E. Marsh 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 



Computerizing the Town's assessing function proceeds at a crawl. 
The Board now has its complete assembly in place and is' beginning to 
confront all the hitches and glitches of loading in its data about 
Lincoln's real estate. We hope, with help, to have data loaded by 
summer. 



This fall, the Board got at least two times as many applications 
for abatement as usual. This dramatic increase tells us — often in 
so many words — that more property owners are having trouble paying 
their increasing tax bills and that many more residents feel that 
their property is over-valued in light of today's real estate market. 
To respond to the latter item first, the real estate slump has indeed 
hit Lincoln, but only partly. The number of real estate sales has 
dropped sharply — to about half what it has been in recent years. 
At the same time, selling prices have held up remarkably well. The 
majority of what few sales we have had have been at prices comfort- 
ably within 10% of what the Board has had the property assessed for. 
About as many of the rest have had selling prices higher than 
assessed value as have had prices below that 10% range of tolerance. 
Lincoln is so nearly at the extreme upper end of the real estate mar- 
ket that decline in value is all but invisible and is essentially 
impossible to substantiate statistically on account of the very small 
number of current sales we have to go by. As for the increasing bur- 
den of property taxes, the Board has done very nearly all it can: It 
has brought before the Town just about every option available to it 
for liberalizing exemptions from local property taxes and is pre- 
paring to present the remainder at the coming Town Meeting. These 
exemptions relieve taxpayers who have legally defined characteristic 
(age, disability, income, other assets) of a legally specified amount 
of their property tax burden. All else depends on spending decisions 
tak^n at Town, state, and federal levels of government. 






The coming fiscal year promises to be a difficult one for the 
Board: We will be grappling with the problems arising from trans- 
lating much of our data processing to our new computer system. We 
will be undergoing our regularly scheduled recertif ication by the 
Commonwealth's Department of Revenue. We will be losing, after an 
all-too-brief but enjoyable and productive tenure, Robert L. Jenal, 
who feels his increasing commitments to warmer weather in Florida in 
the winter prevent him from remaining, in good conscience, a member 
of the Board. Fore! 



62 



Items of assessing regulations you should be familiar with: 



1) The status of property on January 1 is the determinant 
of its value in any year. 

2) All real estate and personal tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year 
involved or within 30 days after the date of mailing of 
the fall tax bill. 

3) Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement appli- 
cations must be filed with the Board by December 31 of 
the year succeeding the year involved. If cars are 
changed during the year, it is the taxpayer's respon- 
sibility to file an abatement application. 

4) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 of the General Laws, 
as amended, provides for certain real estate tax exemp- 
tions for taxpayers who meet certain age, financial, 
etc., qualifications. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Assessors' Office. All applications 
under Clause 41 must be filed by December 15 of the 
year involved. 

5) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A provides for the 
deferral of real estate tax payments in certain in- 
stances. Additional information may be obtained from 
the Assessors' Office. All applications under this 
clause must be filed by December 15 of the year in- 
volved. 

6) Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple 
Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a partial 
exemption. Additional Information may be obtained from 
the Assessors' Office. 



63 



1990-01 RECAPITULATION 



Amount to be raised by Taxation $ 8,491,321.80 



Valuation and Tax Rate 

Real Estate 

Residential $ 728,931,200 

Open Space 19,584,200 

Commercial 17,641,300 

Industrial - - 

Personal Property 8,598,939 

Total Valuation $ 774,755,639 

Tax Rate per Thousand (1990-91) $10.96 

School rate $4.71 

General rate $6.25 



REAL ESTATE SUMMARY 



Assessed Value 
Property Description No. of Parcels Jan. 1, 1990 
Resiiential-single 1408 $ 640,939,700 

dwelling unit 

Condominiums 228 57,363,400 

Residential - two or 8 13,270,300 

more dwelling units 

Part commercial / 12 5,236,800 

Part residential 

Commercial 17 16,076,400 

Land classified under Ch 61, 
61A, & 613 

Agricultural, 12 56,300 

Forest, or 

Recreational 

Conservation Restriction 79 1,504,400 

Vacant Land 265 31,109,400 



64 



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66 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AMD POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D. James Arena, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Police 
Department for the calendar year 1990: 

MOTOR VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATIONS: 

Accidents investigated: 326 

Accidents with injury: 92 

Fatal accidents: 

Citations issued: 1,746 

CRIMINAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATIONS: 

Crimes reported and investigated: 

Break and Entry: 32 

Larcenies: 62 

Stolen Cars/Bikes: 10 

Narcotic Violations: 1 

Ordinance Violations: 30 

Vandalism: 37 

Disturbances: 77 

Domestic/Civil Problems: 24/33 

Reports of Attempted Crimes: 11 

Non-classified Reports: 100 
Arrests, Motor Vehicle 

and Criminal: 136 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES: 

Response to alarms: 677 

Reports of suspicious activity: 67 

Animal complaints: 180 

Ambulance runs: 333 

Ambulance transportation: 248 

Assists to other agencies: 143 

Total calls logged at desk: 12,053 



67 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire 
Department for the calendar year 1990: 

Accidents responded to: 102 

Ambulance runs: 333 

Ambulance transports: 248 

Brush fires: 9 

Building fires: 3 

Box in building: 26 

False alarms: 137 

Investigations: 78 
Lock-outs (vehicle & property): 158 

Vehicle Fires: 19 

Mutual aid responses: 63 
Reports of outside 

burning checked: * 17 

Special service calls: 80 
Reports of water problems 

(flooding, etc.): 17 

Reports of wires down/arcing: 20 

Burning permits issued: 579 

Fire boxes tested: 38 

School drills: 4 

Fire inspections: - 224 

In March of 1990, Town Meeting approved the addition of two 
full-time firefighters to the Department. Call men David Conte and 
Robert Morrison were appointed and completed training at the 
Massachusetts Fire Academy. With them "on board" and with 
supplemental help from the Call Department, we will now have a staff 
of three personnel on duty around the clock at Fire Headquarters, 
improving our response and firefighting capabilities immensely. 

We would remind residents of the importance of smoke detectors 
and urge everyone to consider installing them in their homes. Our 
personnel are always available to guide in the concerns over type and 
locations of same. 



68 



PARKING CLERK 

Lorraine Dean 

REPORT OF PARKING CLERK 1990 

Number of tickets issued: 155 for the year 

Fines paid: 98 for the year 

Fines unpaid: 57 for the year 

Percentage paid: 63% 

Total money taken in for the year 1990 = $980.00 

As of June 30, 1991, I will be retiring from my job, having 
been the first Parking Clerk for the Town of Lincoln since the 
Town took over the task from the various courts. I was 
appointed to this position by the Selectmen on August 16, 1981. 
From the time I began my duties to the end of December 1990, 
there have been 1,119 tickets written and payments collected for 
these tickets in the amount of $6,445.25. 



69 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

Thomas B. Moran, Director 

The Lincoln Civil Defense and Emergency Preparedness organization 
provides a link to the State Civil Defense for physical and fiscal 
assistance in preparing for and responding to emergencies. 

The primary response to emergencies continues to lie with the 
Police and Fire Departments, however, we might anticipate 
circumstances where additional assistance from citizens of the Town 
would be useful. We maintain a roster of local people and their 
skills who can help during emergencies. 

Recent events in Town emphasize the importance of accurate 
communication of the nature and location of an emergency so that a 
timely and adequate response can be made. All of us need to review 
emergency planning so that a family member, friend, or even a 
stranger, receives timely assistance in an 'emergency. In requesting 
assistance, the journalist's: who, what, where, why and when list is 
useful in concisely and accurately describing a problem. 

The "Who" helps to sort out false alarms and permits calls for 
further questions. (A phone number and person to stand by it can 
also be helpful.) The "What" is obvious: fire, car accident, medical 
emergency or crime in progress. Each requires a different response. 
In Lincoln the "Where" may not be a trivial matter for isolated 
houses and particularly, if an emergency occurs on conservation 
land. Care in describing the location and providing someone to meet 
the responders and guide them to the scene can save valuable time. 
The "Why" of an accident may be of value if further problems might 
occur. The "When" is important especially if there is a delay in 
calling in a request. 

Lincoln continues to be the Sector 1C net control station for 
coordinating an amateur radio network that links 16 neighboring towns 
to each other and to the State's Sector headquarters in Tewksbury. 
We continue to hold our bi-monthly nets among the Lincoln amateur 
radio operators on the first and third Mondays of the month. 

We would like to thank the active core of "regulars" who have I 
assisted with our radio drills: Andrew Donovan, Robert Fraser, Glenn 
Gustavson, James Henderson, Fred Hopengarten, John Klobuchar, Pam 
Morton, Joseph Smulowicz and Claire Solraan. This part of our effort 
is coordinated by our Communications Officer Curtis Risley and his i 
Assistant John Solman. 

As part of our emergency planning and training efforts we 

encourage and support community service activities by our 

volunteers. These include assisting the Project Bread's "Walk for 

Hunger," training for new radio operators and maintenance of our 
223.84 MHz radio repeater. 



70 



• 



PUBLIC SAFETY STUDY COMMITTEE 

D. James Arena, Chief of Police and Fire Departments 

David Ramsay, Executive Secretary 

Richard Goddard, Captain, Fire Department 

Allen Bowles, Inspector, Police Department 

Edward Rolfe 

Michael Tennican 

Donald A. Seckler, Chairman 

In 1990 the Public Safety Study Committee concluded work 
undertaken on a charge from the Selectmen to review Lincoln's public 
safety capabilities, project needs for the decade to come, develop 
options for meeting those needs, and analyze the costs and benefits 
associated with these options. A report was submitted, and with 
exhibits and appendices, may be found at Town Offices, at the 
Library, ani at the public safety facility by citizens interested in 
this important area of Town services. Major issues are briefly 
summarized below: 

* The combined police and fire facility in South Lincoln is 
cramped, inefficient, and outdated for many tasks. Updating 
would take considerable resources, and would possibly 
require addition of a second story, if police and fire 
functions are to continue sharing the building. 

* Current police personnel levels are seen by Chief Arena to 
be adequate for the time being, given the number and type of 
calls for service answered in recent years. Changing social 
conditions may require review of personnel levels and 
programs provided. 

* The call fire system has become seriously weakened by social 
and economic conditions which have depleted the number of 
current and potential call firefighters who live or work in 
or near Lincoln. The review of the call system, and of the 
whole matter of fire service personnel levels, found that 
two person coverage of the station was often not consistent 
with safe and effective practice. In light of this finding 
three person staffing was recommended, and this 
recommendation was adopted as a guideline for the 
department. In keeping with this change, Town Meetings in 
the past two years have authorized the hiring of an 
additional four full-time firefighters. 

* Dispatch and communications functions are hampered by 
seriously outmoded equipment. Computerization of the public 
safety services is at a low level relative to other area 
towns, leading to many inefficiencies. Regionalization of 
the dispatch and communication system is a possibility with 
much promise, but one which is hampered by technical, 
political, and other factors which have kept other area 
communities from investing significant energies in 
exploration of the issue. 



71 



* North Lincoln is currently several minutes more distant from 
the fire station than are most other parts of Tovm. The 
difference is significant, and with the growth of 
residential and business activity in North Lincoln, has 
implications for those charged with responsibility for 
public safety. One approach to this problem is to buy 
services from the Air Force Fire Service, a fire department 
staffed by civilian Federal employees, serving Hanscom Air 
Force Base. Another possibility is contracting with 
Massport, now a customer of the Air Force, to buy service 
from Lincoln, with the funds collected being used to upgrade 
the Lincoln department; with new personnel assigned to a new 
North Lincoln sub-station. Both the Federal and Massport 
options have proven difficult or elusive so far. 

* Changes in the present facilities, leaving aside the 
Massport and Airport options, undertaken with the aims of 
updating programs and projecting services more expeditiously 
to North Lincoln, would include: (a.) doing nothing, (b. ) 
upgrading the existing facility only, (c.) construction of a 
new centralized facility, (d.) construction of a new 
facility in North Lincoln and rehabilitating the existing 
facility in South Lincoln, and (e.) rehabilitating the 
existing facility for police only with construction of two 
new, small-scale fire facilities, one in South Lincoln and 
one in North Lincoln. A small fire station may require 
about 3,000 square feet. Construction costs are in the 
vicinity of $110 -$125 per square feet. The present station 
has about 7,000 square feet and is used by two departments. 

Public safety, like other Town services, must be maintained at a 
high level on the limited funds provided by the tax revenues 
collected from a thinly populated area, the citizens of which have 
traditionally limited other potential sources of municipal income. 
Public safety thus joins other government functions in line for scant 
resources. Responsible and effective long-term development of public 
safety services will require voters to allocate resources in a manner 
which assigns priorities and commits revenues on the basis of the 
kind of data which can be found in the Committee's report. 



72 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Ernest Johnson, Building Commissioner 

Courtney Atkinson, Assistant Wiring and Building Inspector 

Kenneth Desmond, Electrical and Fire Alarm Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Jr., Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

James Sullivan, Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Earl Midgeley, Special Assistant to the Building Commissioner 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 



The Battle Road Farm housing development has sold 38 out of 40 
units in Phase I. One of the unsold units is being used as the 
model, the other is being rented to a buyer of a Phase II unit. 

Phase II is progressing after a rather lengthy close-down due 
to funding problems. The full market value units are sold and seven 
affordable units are under purchase agreements. Phase II has 32 
units. 

The large office building complex, Lincoln North, next to 
Battle Road Farm is almost completely filled with new tenants. It is 
a beautiful structure. 

New residential building starts have doubled from a year ago, 
but remodeling and additions were down by 31 permits. The values of 
new work totaled close to seven million dollars. This is 
approximately one and one half million dollars more than 1989. 

Total income from permits ($85,135) was up close to $4,000 over 
the previous year. Below are the statistics for the year. 



Values as submitted by applicants — 

Building $6,829,785.00 

Building, Battle Road Farm: 2,367,060.00 

Plumbing 303,050.00 

Plumbing, Battle Road Farm: 72,000.00 

Electrical 307,059.00 

Electrical, Battle Road Farm: 144,000.00 



Permits issued — 

New Residential 14 

Additions and Remodeling 56 

Garages, Sheds, Barns 20 

Swimming Pools 6 

Greenhouses 

Reroofing 11 

Tents (temporary) 12 

Signs 

Woodburning Stoves 8 

Fences 2 

Tennis Courts 

Accessory Apartments 2 

Total 169 

73 



Permit fees collected — 




Building (private) 


$44,252 


Building - Battle Road Farm 


6,836 


Plumbing (private) 


7,557 


Electrical (private) 


19,967 


Electrical - Battle Road Farm 


6,144 


Woodburning Stoves 


200 


Recertifications 


180 


Total 


$85,136 



74 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Ernest L. Johnson 

The Massachusetts Division of Standards has experienced an 
increase in short measure consumer complaints regarding the sale 
of firewood. The Division expected an increase in these types 
of complaints due to the increase in fuel oil prices. Consumers 
who utilize fuel oil as their primary fuel have been turning to 
alternate fuels such as firewood and coal to replace or 
supplement fuel oil use to reduce overall fuel costs. State Law 
requires, under the provisions of Section 299 of M.G.L. Chapter 
94, t lat a delivery certificate be issued to the seller at the 
time of delivery. Said delivery and the price of the quantity 
of wood delivered in terms of cubic feet , the date of delivery 
and the price of the quantity of wood delivered. The words 
cord, truckload, face cord, pile or terms of similar import are 
expressly prohibited by Statute, Section 298 of M.G.L. Chapter 
94, from being used either in advertisements or delivery 
certificates or sales invoices. Terms to describe quantity 
shall be only in terms of cubic feet . Also the quantity is to 
be determined when the firewood is closely stacked. 

The General Laws of Massachusetts requires that all 
devices used for weighing or measuring commodities be accurately 
checked and certified by "SEALS" at least once each year. 

For the period commencing January 1, 1990, and ending 
December 31, 1990, inclusive, in compliance with Section 37, 
Chapter 93, General Laws as amended, the fol Lowing number of 
devices have been certified: 

Scales sealed 29 

Gasoline meters sealed 29 

Fuel meters not sealed _3 

Total 61 

Sealing fees collected $323.20 

Scales and gasoline pumps not sealed require repairs or 
adjustments. 

Any questions regarding weights and measures should be 
submitted to the Sealer of Weights and Measures at the Town 
Offices Building. 



75 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. John O'Loughlin, Vice-Chairman 
Joan Corastock, R.N. , Secretary 
Dr. Perry Culver, Chairman 

Agents for the Board: 

Jane Bamet, Administrative Assistant 
Frank C. Emmons, Engineer 
John J. Devine, Sanitarian 
Jane Barnet, Animal Inspector 

Local Boards of Health in Massachusetts are required by 
state statutes and regulations to perform many important and 
crucial duties relative to the protection of public health, the 
control of disease, the promotion of sanitary living conditions, 
and the protection of the environment from damage and 
pollution. In addition to required duties, local Boards of 
Health are authorized to promulgate supplemental regulations 
which extend the Boards' authority over a broad range of health, 
sanitation, and environmental problems. These requirements 
reflect the Legislature's understanding that many critical 
health problems are best handled by the involvement of local 
community officials familiar with local conditions. 

The Board reminds citizens with private wells that they 
are responsible for ascertaining and maintaining the quality and 
purity of their water supplies. The Board of Health has no 
legal responsibilities in this regard but offers its services to 
provide information about reliable sources of water testing. 

The Board of Health steadfastly supports the activation of 
regular hazardous waste collection days and encourages all 
interested boards and committees to push for rapid development 
of the habit of recycling solid waste materials. 

Cindy Anthony, R.N. , continues in the position as 
School/Town Nurse and the Board is most pleased with her 
performance. She handles her job with interest, intelligence, 
good humor, and a willingness we are all fortunate to be able to 
avail ourselves of, if necessary. She is available to serve 
townspeople and can be reached at 259-9407. The Board is most 
pleased to have Cindy in its employ, and it is our wish she will 
continue in this position for a long time to come. 

The Board of Health meets the first Monday of each month 
and more often, if needed. 



76 






Reports of Board Activities : 

1. Enforcement of Title V of the State Environmental Code: 

This included conducting examinations of sites for sewage 
and septage disposal, issuing permits, inspecting and approving 
installation of equipment, holding hearings, granting variances, 
etc. The total amount of fees collected for the year was 
$11,722.00. Summary of activities is as follows: 

Site investigations witnessed (i.e., percolation 

tests and test pits) 29 

New disposal systems reviewed and approved 20 

Repaired disposal systems reviewed and approved 9 

Systems investigated for accessory apartments 2 

Installers permits issued 22 
Septage handlers equipment inspected and licenses 

issued 6 

2. Sanitarian Inspections: 

Sanitarian John Devine helped the Board enforce local 
health regulations according to Chapter X of the State Sanitary 
Code. Regular inspections of food service establishments in 
Lincoln were performed during the year including restaurants and 
food service facilities in stores, schools, institutions, farm 
stands, as well as several facilities at Hanscom Field, namely 
Hanscom Middle School cafeteria, Kustom Katering, Professional 
Chef, and Linda's, and permits were issued. The new commercial 
building, Lincoln North, has quite an elaborate cafeteria which 
has also been extensively inspected by Mr. Devine. The Codman 
Pool and bathhouse were also inspected by the Sanitarian as were 
the three day camps and Farrington Memorial. Complaints from 
citizens of possible food contamination are also investigated by 
the Sanitarian. 

3. School Health Program: 

The school health program aims to promote and protect the 
health of students while encouraging a better understanding of 
the human body, human relationships, and the importance of a 
healthy lifestyle. The program provides for emergency and 
routine intervention for illness and injury, referrals to a 
medical facility as needed, vision, hearing and scoliosis 
screening, health teaching, and serves as a resource to parents 
if needed. The Director of Pupil Services, Dot Olson, works 
closely with the Health Services personnel. This year, Dr. Lynn 
Weigel served as the school physician. 

The school nurse provided a free tuberculosis screening 
clinic in October for all school personnel, bringing everyone 
up-to-date on their TB status. Support personnel, including the 
bus drivers, also participated in the clinic. 



77 



The school health personnel are as follows: 

Cynthia Anthony, R.N., School/Town Nurse 
Anne Marie Mahoney, School Health Aide 
Laurel DiMatteo, School Health Aide 
Lynn Weigel, M.D., School Physician 

4. Flu Clinic: 

This year members of the Board of Health and the Tovra 
Nurse administered influenza innoculations at the annual Flu 
Clinic for the Council on Aging. 250 individuals received the 
flu vaccine. A make-up clinic was held later in November at 
which time another 50 persons received innoculations. 

5. Summary of Eliot Community Mental Health Center Activities: 

This facility provides services to Lincoln residents and 
includes an outpatient clinic, geriatric, mental retardation, 
and therapeutic preschool programs. Nine towns participate in 
funding these services and Lincoln's contribution to the Mental 
Health Center in 1990 was $6,500. 

6. Report of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project: 

The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project conducts a 
program in Lincoln consisting of mosquito and wetland 
surveillance, water management and public education. 

The goal of the surveillance program is to target mosquito 
breeding areas and to monitor changes in the adult mosquito 
population. Adult mosquito populations are determined regularly 
at three sites around the Town. These data aid the Project in 
determining the need for control. The State Department of 
Public Health utilizes some of these data to monitor those 
species associated with Eastern Equine Encephalitis. 

The project conducted a program of aerial spraying of Bti 
over 147 wetland acres. This spraying was very effective in 
reducing mosquito larvae and there were no harmful effects. 

7. Summary of Animal Inspector's Activities: 

The animal inspector's responsibilities are to supply the 
Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of 
Animal Health, with a list of animal owners, the number of 
livestock, and general health of animals in the Town. A 
compilation of the 1990 animal census is as follows: 

Number of Dairy Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 8 

Number of Beef Herds ( " " ") 28 

Number of Horses 81 

Number of Ponies 10 

Number of Donkeys 1 

Number of Goats 4 



78 



Number of Sheep 105 

Number of Swine 14 

If complaints arise with regard to the health or care of 
any livestock, the animal inspector investigates the 
circumstances in accordance with laws and regulations relating 
to animal health. 

8. Rabies Clinic: 

Each spring the Board sponsors a rabies clinic for dogs 
owned by Lincoln residents. In 1990, 19 dogs were vaccinated 
against rabies during clinic hours held on May 20th at the Town 
Barn. Dr. Gardiner Kenneson of Acton administered the 
innoculations. All dogs vaccinated between 3-12 months of age 
last year should be vaccinated again this year. A booster shot 
is then recoamended every three years. Pet owners should 
consult with their veterinarian about the need for rabies and 
feline leukemia immunization for cats. 

Once again, there are on-going concerns of the Board which 
have not been adequately addressed: 

A. Continued development of new housing on lands of 
marginal quality presents threats to the preservation of the 
purity of ground water and aquifers. 

B. The existence of underground storage tanks for oil and 
gasoline presents an on-going threat for pollution. A complete 
survey and testing of all of these tanks must be undertaken. 



79 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Albert Avery, Vice Chairperson 

Sally Chandler 

Marian Cook. 

Barbara Cone 

Shirley Drew 

Marie Gavin 

Bea Grim 

Russell Mahan 

Ward Sands 

Peggy Schaertzler, Secretary/Treasurer 

Aire -Mai ja Schwann 

Ruth Morey, Chairperson 

Ruth Kramer, Director 

Liz King, Assistant to the Director 

Harriet Todd, Selectman Liaison 

The Purpose of the Council on Aging is to provide activities | 
and programs to enhance and enrich the lives of our elders as well as ' 
to solve Individual problems if requested. It has been a busy year 
as always, with good attendance at all programs and activities. 

Eleven clinics for blood pressure, and ten clinics for 
podiatric care were held and were well attended. The annual Flu 
Immunization Clinic coordinated with the Board of Health in November 
shows an increasing participation each year. New this year is the 
Shine (Serving Health Information Needs for the Elderly) program with 
Al Avery serving as Counselor on an advance appointment basis. 

Activities included weekly Bridge playing, "beginners" in 
Bridge, chair caning, bowling, line dancing, "easy moves", and Spring 
and Fall walks. The varied monthly bus trips cover places of 
interest and events and continue to be popular and well attended. 
The Monthly Newsletter mailed to all residents publicizes all the ij 
programs and activities. 

This year several of the Town's talented artists and 
photographers have been successfully included in our programs. Of 
new and special interest was the art display of the Hartwell first 
grade with a visit and explanation by each artist. The "Coffee and 
Conversation" with special monthly programs continues to meet the' 
varied interests of the elders. 

To help with the transportation needs of elders a taxi service, 
funded through State Formula grant, has been available for local 
medical appointments again this year. 

Due to Ruth Kramer, Director, and Liz King, her Assistant, 
together with the volunteers giving generously of their time, the 
programs continue to grow and be successful. At present Russell 
Mahan is serving as our Secretary/Treasurer while Peggy Schraertzler 
is on a temporary leave of absence. 

As the elder population continues to grow, volunteers are vital 
to the success of all our programs. 

80 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE (MHC) 

Ruth I. Morey, Board Member 

Minuteman Home Care (MHC) is a non-profit social service agency 
which assists persons 60 years and older to live in the dignity and 
comfort of their own homes and communities. The bulk of the 
Minuteman Home Care budget comes from State and Federal government 
funding sources. 

State Home Care Program provides services such as homemaking, 
chores, transportation and some administrative expenses. 

Title IIIB and Title IIIC of the Older Americans Act provides 
funding for the home delivered meal programs, congregate meals, legal 
services, transportation and innovative community projects. 

A portion of the MHC budget comes from sixteen member 
communities and this contribution is a critical part of the agency's 
support. Through payment of an annual "local share" Lincoln is 
entitled to be represented on the policy setting Board of Members 
(MHC) which administers the services. The Board consists of twenty 
members and eight members-at-large. During the 1990 fiscal year, the 
local share assessed to the Town of Lincoln was $420.00. The amount 
is calculated from a formula based on members of the community aged 
60 years and over, as determined by the 1980 Federal Census. 

During fiscal year July 1, 1989 to June 30, 1990, an average of 
six Lincoln residents received services under the State Home Care 
Program for a total value of $17,779.00. Another $7,404.00 funded by 
Title IIIB and Title IIIC of the Older Americans Act brought the 
total value of Minuteman Home Care contributions and services to 
Lincoln in fiscal year 1990 to a total of $25,183.00. 

Lincoln's participation through the appointed Board member to 
Minuteman Home Care and its "local share" is vital to the continued 
successful operation of Minuteman Home Care (MHC) and provision of 
services to the elders in our region. 



81 



DOG OFFICER 

In March 1990, the Lincoln Board of Selectmen entered into a 
contract with Mr. Leslie Boardman to provide 24 hours/day, 365 
days/year dog officer services to the Town. The Dog Officer, or his 
agent, can be reached by calling the business phone at the Lincoln 
Police Station. The dispatchers record all calls for the Dog Officer 
and the Dog Officer then picks up these messages each evening. 
Non-emergency callers can expect a return call within the next day. 
If the call is an emergency, the Dog Officer will be paged for an 
immediate response. 

After .nine months, the program seems to be running smoothly. It 
is clear that this would not be the case without the cooperation of 
the dispatchers and the Chief of Police. The Selectmen would also 
like to thank Mr. Boardman for his efforts. The Board looks forward 
to continuing this arrangement. 

The Rabies Clinic was held on May 19, 1990. This year, nineteen 
dogs were innoculated. 

A reminder: Dog owners must now license their dogs by January 1 
of each year. Owners not licensing their dogs by April 1 will be 
subject to a $5.00 fine in addition to the regular licensing fee. 
Licensing fees are as follows: 

Male/Female $10.00 

Spayed/Neutered $ 6.00 

Kennel License $25.00 (up to 4 dogs) 

Kennel License $50.00 (up to 10 dogs) 

Please remember, licenses make all the difference when trying to 
return a lost dog to its owner. 



82 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE (NESWC) 

Henry J. Rugo, Town Representative 

Plant Operations: The North Andover plant has averaged 92% of 
the time on line; both boilers have not been out simultaneously and 
the generator has required no down time. 

Fire protection system improvements have been agreed upon 

between NESWC and the plant operator and with the North Andover fire 

protection authorities. Wheelabrator management approval is the only 
step remaining before the modifications are put in place. 

Landfill: Development of the "roadway" area of the present 
landfill was completed, despite problems with the construction 
contractor, and permits granted by the regulatory agencies. This 
area, currently in use, extends the life of the landfill for project 
purposes by at least 4 years. These purposes are: disposing of the 
ash residue and emergency bypass of the disposal plant. 

For a new parcel, rights to which were acquired last year, a 
qualified engineering consultant is performing a study under contract 
to determine what development will be required to meet environmental 
standards. The results will be compared with an alternative that is 
currently being negotiated, and the best of the two chosen. 
Completion of either one will increase the life of the landfill by 12 
years at the current rate of project use. 

The use of ash for higher economic applications continues to be 
urged by NESWC, but response of the regulatory agencies has been 
glacially slow. Because success in this area would extend landfill 
life and possibly provide new revenue to the project, NESWC will 
continue its prompting. 

Tipping Fee: Net solid-waste-disposal unit cost (the $/ton 
"tipping fee") for FY90 was $60/ton including the NESWC management 
budget; for FV91 it is $63, reflecting the escalation of the price 
index for the Boston area. 

The tipping fee is calculated essentially by subtracting the 
revenues of the project from the expenses of running the plant and 
dividing the result by the total number of tons processed. The 
largest single expense is the debt service of the construction bonds 
and of a loan that automatically was applied due to erroneous 
interpretation of the bond indenture by the former legal counsel. 
Thanks to prepayment negotiated by NESWC, the latter loan will be 
paid off by the end of the next fiscal year with a total saving to 
the project of about $16 million. The project trust indenture would 
permit refinancing of the construction bonds by 1993. Refinancing at 
interest rates comparable to the current market could lower the NESWC 
tipping fee by $10 to $15 per ton for the remaining life of the 
contract. This option is being actively pursued with major 
underwriting institutions with encouraging results. 



83 



Continued attempts to increase project revenues by 
renegotiating the energy contract with New England Power Company have 
not met with cooperation from MRI thus far. 

MRI Claim : Potentially the most serious event of the year is 
the claim of Massachusetts Refusetech, lac. (MRI), the disposal plant 
contractor, against NESWC for a significant increase in the operating 
and maintenance fee. The binding arbitration demanded by MRI (in 
accordance with the Service Agreements) is currently in process. 
NESWC takes the position that the claim is without merit and that the 
present fee- is as much as can be justified under the Service 
Agreements. 

The claim, if fully allowed, would total about $75 million over 
the next 15 years, an increase of as much as $27/ton in the tipping 
fee that wouli have to be paid by each of the member communities, 
including Lincoln, for the remaining life of the contract. Since 
tills would present a serious ani unwarranted problem with town 
budgets, NESWC is pursuing its defense against this claim by all 
means available. Accordingly, legal counsel is representing NESWC s 
position in all the proceedings, with the support of necessary 
technical, accounting and financial consultants. The NESWC Executive 
Committee directs and coordinates all elements of the action in 
defense of the members' interests. 

To prepare for supporting efforts that may be appropriate in 
the future, a strong, unified front by all the NESWC member 
communities will be needed. To assist that end and to encourage 
public support, detailed presentations and discussions have been 
conducted with the chief executive officers and administrators of the 
member communities. The Lincoln Selectmen and staff have been very 
helpful in the development o c this communications program. 

To keep the public informed, NESWC has also organized and 
distributed press releases to a wide geographic media pool, with good 
results. State legislators are being kept informed and alerted to 
legislative initiatives that may be helpful in support of NESWC. 

Recycling: Recycling by the member communities was facilitated 
by provisions that NESWC insisted be included in the Service 
Agreements. NESWC continues to support these efforts by urging the 
development of privately-owned materials recycling facilities (MRF) 
that would complement the North Andover disposal plant and to provide 
members with information. 

Adjustment of the guaranteed tonnage provisions of the Service 
Agreements, to compensate for the reduction in deliveries due to 
recycling, continues to be negotiated with the plant operator, but 
MRI has resisted a satisfactory solution by trying to make progress 
on this issue contingent on settlement of their (unrelated) claim. 

NESWC continues to urge the cooperation of MRI in recruiting 
new member communities to absorb the plant capacity released by 
recycling, thus far without signal success. 



84 



Financial Management : As previously reported, NESWC assumed 
active control of investment of project bond reserve funds in April 
1938. Results to date have not only substantially improved project 
revenues from this source, but are providing protection against 
falling market interest rates with the security of U.S. Treasury 
instruments. 

Computer modeling for use as a financial management tool 
continues to be developed with provisions for anticipating future 
capital needs such as the acid gas scrubbers that will be required by 
recently enacted statutes. (A contract has been let for an 
engineering study of the most economical solution to this problem.) 
Acquisition and development of landfill capacity to meet future 
project needs have already been made possible through this means. 

Every avenue is being vigorously pursued that would reduce 
expenses and increase revenues so the tipping fee can be kept as low 
as possible. 

Project Management : The biennial election of Advisory Board 
Officers and Executive Committee was held at the April meeting with a 
change of chairman of the Advisory Board and of the Executive 
Committee. The Lincoln member was reelected as Treasurer and as a 
member of the Executive Committee. He continues as Chairman of the 
Financial Affairs Subcommittee. 






85 



LINCOLN RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Abigail Avery 

Dorothy Yu Brennan 

Vicky Diadiuk 

Gwyn Loud 

Enid Sichel, Chairman 

In 1990, Lincoln began recycling newspapers, white office paper, 
clear glass and green glass. In the first 8 months of newspaper 
recycling, 145 tons were collected for an average of 18 tons/month. 
In 9 months of glass collection, approximately 10 tons of clear glass 
and approximately 10 tons of green glass were collected, for an 
average of about 1 ton/month of clear and 1 ton/month of green 
glass. In 7 months of white paper collection at the Town Offices, 
2445 pounds were collected, for an average of 350 pounds/month. At 
the transfer station, 800 pounds of white paper were collected in 3 
months, for an average of 270 pounds/month. For per capita and per 
household data, we note that in 1990, Lincoln's population was 4,468 
in 1,817 households. 

There was an interruption of newspaper recycling in 1990, when 
the hauler failed to collect a load of newpapers and a new hauler was 
engaged. The committee is still working on the following unfinished 
business - convincing the Town that a contract should be signed with 
the newspaper and glass haulers to avoid interruptions of service and 
to obtain the lowest price for the service. The committee continues 
to urge that plastics recycling should begin. 

In Fiscal Year 1990, Lincoln was about 400 tons below its 
promised tonnage to NESWC , and sold the unused tonnage (which we had 
to pay for at $62/ton, whether it was delivered or not). The 
committee estimates that the actual tonnage will not be in balance 
with the promised tonnage until FY93. The Town calculates that the 
recycling program cost $5,000. in FY90. We expect that the Town will 
eventually realize a savings in NESWC fees from its recycling program. 

The committee met at least monthly in 1990, and meetings were 
often attended by interested citizens and representatives of other 
recycling groups. Committee members also attended regional recycling 
meetings, such as those sponsored by the Eastern Massachusetts 
Recycling Association, of which Lincoln is a member. We kept the 
Lincoln Journal informed of our meetings, activities, and the status 
of the recycling program at the transfer station. The committee 
prepared an informational flyer for Town-wide distribution and 
sponsored a low-energy float in the Fourth of July parade. The 
committee is grateful for the fine effort of the transfer station 
personnel in making the recycling program a success, and we look 
forward to an expanded program in 1991. 



86 



Planning* and Public Works 



PIANNING BOARD 

Kenneth Bassett 

Elizabeth Corcoran 

Palmer Faran 

Dilla Tingley 

F. Douglas Adams, Chairman 

One aspect of planning is to continually monitor one's past 
forecasts for the future in regards to the current events. Last 
year, the Planning Board got at least one thing right! Upon the 
request of the Finance Committee, we significantly reduced our budget 
for legal expenses, as both boards concurred that the beginning 
downturn in the regional economy would likely soon affect the 
building activities in the Town of Lincoln. This year, as the 
regional economy further deteriorated, there was a quieting of 
activity before the Board. 

However, this reduction of daily pressure for the Town planners 
has allowed us to gain an edge on reviewing a number of areas of 
long-term planning, which we feel will be of benefit to the Town. 
The clear prospect for the next 3-5 years of budgetary constraint is 
of great concern. Sustaining quality services and schools will 
create clear demands on available revenue. The challenge for the Town 
of Lincoln is whether we may also sustain in this climate the 
community's longstanding tradition of creative and forward-thinking 
land use. We think so. Indeed, we forecast opportunities as a 
number of planning issues are being worked on regarding the ultimate 
build-out of the Lincoln landform based on existing zoning. 
Presentations will be made in the forthcoming Town-vide conference in 
October 1991, so that the community may review its direction. 

Critical agents in this process have been the Long-Range Planning 
Committee and the increased interaction and coordination of land use 
activity engaging the energies of the Board of Health, the 
Conservation Commission, and the Planning Board. One land use model 
that may merit general review is the change from so-called "by-right 
zoning" to "clustered zoning," a norm of clustered site plan 
subdivisions. A number of Town citizens have expressed concern about 
the size of new speculatively developed residences in Town and 
concern for a broader range of community review. These concerns are 
reflected in the design review process of cluster subdivisions. 
Today there is a need for creative new approaches. One possible land 
use initiative might allow for a concentration of density near the 
Lincoln commercial center to allow the Town to improve housing for 
the elderly and to clarify this commercial sector. Resources arising 
from this intensified land use might establish a fund to fulfill 
long-range open space plans, and to obtain parcels critical to 
sectors of neighborhoods where trail easements or more modest land 

87 



purchases with private participation might be of great benefit to the 
system of conservation trails. New housing initiatives are 
possible. All of these initiatives could function without any 
further burden on the tax base, which we are aware will be sorely 
tried over the forthcoming years. Creative modeling may 
clarif yLincoln' s long-term and alternative forms of zoning. 
Community review and discussion can create significant opportunities 
upon which we might capitalize despite the current regional economic 
s lowdown . 

Notwithstanding this picture, a number of specific projects have 
continued to engage the Planning Board. A series of subdivisions 
have been under design: the Winchell family land off Route 126 and 
bordering Farrar Pond has been proposed for a cluster subdivision; 
similarly, a four-lot cluster subdivision of Pickman land between 
South Great Road and Farrar Pond has been reviewed at an initial 
conceptual design phase. The Coburn Farm cluster subdivision has 
been largely completed with the last two houses currently under 
construction. Each of these cluster subdivisions has allowed the 
Planning Board to work with the property owner or developer in order 
to recognize the specifics of land form as influences on the mandated 
set-aside of communal lands for conservation benefit, trail 
easements, and the specific siting of buildings within defined 
building envelopes so as to minimize impacts and intrusions of new 
construction. In both the Winchell and Pickman properties, the land 
form features with numerous kettleholes from glaciation impacting 
site decisions, combined with the benefits of views across the pond, 
have shown the virtues of this planning procedure. A further benefit 
is the Board's review procedure in terms of ultimately approving the 
architectural character of these new developments. 

In North Lincoln a land-locked parcel owned by the Cotoni family 
is under discussion for prospective development. The question of J 
clarifying access rights across the parcel in which fee title was * 
transferred to the Town of Lincoln some years ago, despite apparent il 
rights of passage extended through an easement, has also been under tjh 
review by the Board of Selectmen. The intention in this review 
process has been to clarify limits on development pursuant to access 
rights and potential benefits in terms of housing initiatives to the 
Town. The review process continues on the Stratford Realty proposal 
for lands off Huckleberry Hill Road. The process involves the Board 
of Health, the Conservation Commission, and the Planning Board. Some 
Initial lots were created within this landform through the Approval 
Not Required process of lot creation extending from existing frontage 
rights. Review of the further subdivision of the land and the issue 
of a new subdivision road continues. 

The Planning Board has worked closely with the Housing Commission 
and the Selectmen in order to sustain one of the state's most 
innovative programs, the Home Ownership Program project at Battle 
Road Farm in North Lincoln. Last year the Town welcomed the new 
citizens from the first phase of 40 units. Regrettably, the 
financial stresses of the region were visited on the prime 
construction lender for this community, and the involvement of the 
FDIC in lending led to a loss of construction financing and briefly 
the build-out of the second phase of the community was interrupted. 



88 






The collaborative effort of the MHFA, Town officials, and Lincoln 
House Associates was successful in generating a new source of 
construction financing. Consequently, work on the interior finish of 
the second phase of the Battle Road Farm community has been renewed. 
Notwithstanding, the significant success of this project in terms of 
the ratio of moderate and low income housing to market rate 
housingand its significance as an award-winning design, the realities 
of securing financing for the third and final phase of the project in 
the forthcoming months within a constrained lending cycle may have 
implications for the Town, which may be clarified by the Town in the 
upcoming Town Meeting. As the lending community is seeking higher 
levels of security through the project pro forma' s prospective profit 
margin, and given the concerns about the difficulty of selling 
properties, the ratio of market rate to affordable units in the third 
phase may become a topic of a warrant article for Town review at the 
forthcoming March Town Meeting. 

In a small community the expansion of regulatory constraints 
which have developed over the last decade poses a large burden on the 
small staff of the Town Offices. The boards involved with physical 
land use planning have sought to meet periodically to discuss 
projects, from the most initial and conceptual review with 
landowners. We hope that by using the available resources and 
energies within the community we may continue to apply the creative 
development mechanisms and land use policies which have created the 
value - economic, social, and environmental - that distinguishes the 
Town of Lincoln. This process needs further effort, but we believe 
such coordination will have significant benefits to the community in 
a period where regulatory review may be a much more evident influence 
on land use than direct purchase. 

This year Liz Corcoran will be leaving our board. The void her 
departure creates will be large and deeply felt. We will miss Liz's 
energy, focus and wisdom. ..and her laugh. A consolation is that so 
long as she makes Lincoln her place, our community will be wiser, 
better, and enlightened. 



89 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Despena F. Billings 
Morton B. Braun 
C. Russel Hansen 
D'Arcy G. MacMahon 
Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 

Amalie Kass, Associate Member 
F. John Solman, Associate Member 

The Board of Appeals hears and decides appeals from decisions 
of the Building Inspector, requests for special permits and requests 
for variances from the requirements of the Town Zoning By-law, The 
power and authority of the Board of Appeals is set forth in Chapter 
40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, in the Town By-law, in rules 
and regulations thereunder, and in numerous court decisions 
interpreting these statutes, rules and regulations. 

Any person who is aggrieved by reason of his inability to 
obtain a permit or enforcement action from the Building Inspector 
pursuant to Section 3 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, is 
entitled, pursuant to Section 20.2(b) of the By-law, to appeal that 
decision to the Board of Appeals. The Board follows applicable rules 
and regulations in hearing these appeals. 

The Board also hears requests for special permits for accessory 
apartaents, for the conduct of certain occupations in residences, for 
the operation of commercial business in Town, for the change or 
alteration of nonconforming uses or structures, and for such other 
subjects as the By-law provides. The By-law requires that, before 
granting any request for a special permit, the Board of Appeals shall 
determine that the use for which such permit is requested is in 
harmony with the general purposes and intent of the By-law and that 
the proposed use is not detrimental or injurious to persons or 
property. In addition, the permit must meet the requirements of the 
specific section of the 3y-law with respect to which it is being 
requested. 

The third area of the Board's jurisdiction is to hear requests 
for variances. Unlike special permits, variances run with the land. 
Requests for variances present a special problem, since the Board's 
power to grant them is constrained by state law. The criteria upon 
which variance requests must be judged have also changed considerably 
over the years. As provided in Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
40A, Section 10, and Section 20.2(d) of the By-law, a variance may be 
granted only if, owing to the circumstances relating to soil 
conditions, shape, or topography of the land or structure: (1) a 
literal enforcement of the By-law would involve substantial hardship 
to the person seeking the variance; and (2) a variance would not 
cause substantial detriment to the public good; and (3) a variance 
would not nullify or substantially depart from the intent or purpose 
of the By-law. In interpreting this statute, the Massaachusetts 
appellate courts have held consistently that, since variances are 
always in derogation of the zoning system adopted by the town, "they 
are to be granted sparingly". Pendergast v. Board of Appeals of 



90 



Barnstable , 331 Mass. 555, 557 (1954); Damaskos v. Board of Appeals 
of Boston, 27 Mass. App. Ct. 754, 755 (1989); Gulragosslan v. Board 
of Appeals of Watertown , 21 Mass. Ap. Ct. Ill, 115 (1935). Many 
persons seeking a variance assert "substantial hardship" as the basis 
for their request, only one criteria which the Board of Appeals must 
consider. However, the courts have found substantial hardship to 
exist only where the development or use permitted by the By-law would 
be economically unfeasible for anyone, not merely expensive. 

The Board of Appeals considers closely the facts of each 
individual case which comes before it, and interprets those facts in 
light of the By-law's own language. In this way, the Board attempts 
to strike an often difficult balance between granting the requested 
relief to an individual and upholding the integrity of the Zoning 
By-law enacted by all of the Town's residents. 



There were 10 applications filed, 
renewals published during 1990 as follows: 



10 hearings scheduled, 18 



January 22 



LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE, INC., 170 SOUTH GREAT RD. 

renewal and modification of special permit GRANTED 

NORMAN B. & MARY A. HECHT, 8 LAUREL DR. 

variance from front yard setback for DENIED AS NOT 
accessory structure REQUIRED 



February 12 



BUILDERS' CLU3 OF LINCOLN, INC. 181 LINCOLN RD. 
renewal and modification of special permit 
for charitable institution GRANTED 



March 19 



TRANSFER SERVICES, INC. 15 LEVJIS ST. renewal 
of special permit for business 



GRANTED 



May 14 - 
June 18 - 
August 6 - 



DOUGLAS & RHONDA SWAIN, 143 SOUTH GREAT RD. 

special permit for apartment GRANTED 

RONALD CHRISTENSEN, 345 SOUTH GREAT RD. 

special permit for business DENIED 

BUILDERS' CLUB OF LINCOLN, INC, 131 LINCOLN RD. 
modification of special permit for Boy Scout 
use. GRANTED 



October 22 - ANTHONY MRUGALA, CAMBRIDGE TPKE. renewal of 
special permit for hay/sleigh rides 



GRANTED 



December 10 - CHARLES, DAVID, JOHN & LIDA ARMSTRONG, 172 

BEDFORD RD. variance from rear setback DENIED AS NOT 

REQUIRED 



December 17 - DOHERTY'S GARAGE, INC. 161 LINCOLN RD. 
modification of special permit for 
restaurant 



NOT REQUIRED 



91 



RENEWALS 



Paula Bennett, 10 Beaver Pond Rd. - Apartment 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Braasch, Sandy Pond Rd. - Apartment 

Roger M. Burke, 9 Tabor Hill Rd. - Apartment 

Walter J. Burke, Cambridge Tpke. - Apartment 

Constance M. Diab, Deer Run Rd - Apartment 

Doherty's Garage, Inc. Lincoln Rd. - Restaurant 

Ann C. Gannett, Old Concord Rd. - Apartment 

Giles Dilg, Lewis St. - Real Estate Office 

Neil Eeinberg, 104 Concord Rd. - Apartment 

Fred Hopengarten, 6 Willarch Rd. - Radio Tower 

Katherine Caldwell Ives, 70 Bedford Rd. - Apartment 

Lincoln Housing Commission, Codraan Rd. - Apartment 

Massachusetts Audubon Society, South Great Road - Charitable use 

Natalie Miller, Old County Rd. - Apartment 

Marcia Roehr, Old Concord Rd. - Apartment 

Fred Ruland, 112 Trapelo Rd - Apartment 

Wilfred Schmid, 21 Silver Hill Rd - Apartment 

Bella C. Wheeler, 14 Old Cambridge Tpke. - Apartment 



92 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Liz Downey 

Bob Jenal 

Katherine Preston 

Bill Stason 

Larry Thompson 

Bob Leciire, Chairman 

We continue to work toward completion of our analysis of the 
Town's development potential under existing zoning by-laws. We are 
also cooperating with the Finance Committee in the development of its 
long range fiscal model. These materials, along with the now 
completed Lincoln land use map will be prepared as resources for the 
1991 planning forum. 



93 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

J. Quincy Adams 

Claire Cunningham 

Joan Kimball 

Christopher Klem 

Robert Mack 

Nathalie Rice 

Thomas Billings, Chairman 

In 1990, J. Quincy Adams resigned after an impressive twenty 
nine years of work on the Commission. Mr. Adams served for nine 
years as Chairman and has been a driving force behind the protection 
of open space in Lincoln. The Commission will miss him greatly and 
we wish him well in his new home in Maine. 

PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

Open Space Activities : The Commission continues to work toward 
the completion of the Open Space Plan. Although the Plan is nearing 
completion, many important aspects must be achieved before, as Quincy 
might say, we have "closed the ring". Few acquisitions are left to 
consider. The Commission is seeking innovative ways to provide this 
open space for recreation and conservation purposes through donations 
of conservation easements, creative development options and other 
methods. Finally, the Commission is working on acquiring trail I 
easements to ensure connections between properties and enhance the 
network of trails. 



Wetlands : During 1990, the first full year of the Town Wetlands 
Protection Bylaw, significant wetland resource protection was 
achieved. A total of twenty three Public Hearings were held under 
the Bylaw and the State Wetlands Protection Act. Applicants' 
proposals for work near wetlands were subject to careful 
consideration which ultimately resulted in better projects from the 
applicant while serving the interests of the Wetland Protection Act 
and the Town Bylaw. 

In addition to various minor projects, the one major project the 
Commission reviewed was the Stratford Realty (Adler's Woods) 
stormuater drainage proposal which was approved in December. The 
Commission also continued Its review of the capping of the former 
Lincoln Sanitary Landfill which is now substantially complete, and 
continues to monitor the upgrading of Route 2. 

Staffing : The Commission regretfully accepted the resignation 
of Harris Roen, Chief Conservation Ranger. Harris brought 
considerable experience, knowledge and enthusiasm to the Ranger 
Program, and we will miss his good work. The Commission appreciates 
the continued excellent work of Michael Murphy, our Conservation Land 
Manager, and his crew, Conservation Technicians Scott Mooney and Gary 
Puffer. The Commission also appreciates the fine work of JoAnne 
Carr, Conservation Administrator, and Renee DiCicco, Conservation 
Intern. 



94 



CONSERVATION LAND MANAGEMENT 

Ranger Program : In 1990, user visits totalled approximately 
30,000 on all conservation lands. The Lincoln Conservation Rangers 
continue to be a source of information and knowledge to all who use 
the conservation lands in Town. Ranger duties also include trail 
patrols and maintenance of the over 60 miles currently managed by the 
Conservation Commission. Throughout the year, the rangers offered 
natural history programs to residents and schools. During the 
summer, Chief Ranger Harris Roen had the help of summer rangers Jane 
Layton, Steve Hanna and Melissa Flinn, all well versed in natural 
history and environmental education. The rangers were able to keep 
problems at bay without the issuance of any citations. 

Donation boxes were installed at the Mount Misery, Schools, and 
Lincoln Woods parking lots. Money contributed to these is intended 
to help offset the costs of the Ranger Program and trail 
maintenance. Added income is also made through Group Use fees; 
together these two combine to make about $800. 

Farmland Program : A total of 162.7 acres are leased to five 
farmers. Rental fees from Town-owned agricultural lands totalled 
$3,590.50 for the 1990 growing season. 

Trails : At Battle Road Farm a path was constructed within the 
buffer parcel linking the trails around the housing area to the 
National Park property. Along Codman Road, construction of a roadside 
path was initiated; this path will link the Concord Road path to the 
Police station area. Continued erosion control took place on trails 
throughout town involving installation of water bars and the 
spreading of wood chips. 

Fields : At Flint's Fields, brush and small trees were removed to 
open a larger part of the field for agricultural use and to allow 
people to have access from the Cemetery property. Stones were removed 
from agricultural fields and put into stone dumps to facilitate earth 
plowing. Field edges were cleared around Town for agricultural and 
aesthetic reasons. Open field mowing took place throughout the Town 
on Commission, Lincoln Land Conservation Trust, Cemetery and School 
property. 

Wood lands : Forestry work continued at the Adams Woods parcel 
involving a release of white pine that is much better suited for the 
soils of the area than the slow growing oaks that are present. At the 
Sandy Pond 77 Acre Parcel, the red pines planted by Sumner Smith were 
pole pruned and thinned. 

Town Plantings and Tree Care : A pink dogwood that was removed 
from the front of the Town Office building In order to remove the 
underground storage tank was transplanted back to its original 
location. At Pierce Park, the 50" diameter American Elm was removed, 
this 95 year old tree having succumbed to the Dutch Elm Disease. A. 
replacement Elm is situated closer to the pond. This tree is being 
protected by elimination of root grafts, and chemical injections. 



95 



Other Projects : At the Sudbury River Canoe Landing brush was 
removed, guardrails were repaired, and the parking lot was graded. 
Continued maintenance of the Baker Bridge Brush Dump took place (this 
area is open to Lincoln residents for brush disposal on the first 
Saturday of each month). Major equipment repair involved the 
replacement of the clutch, fuel injection system and brakes on the 
1930 IH tractor. Miscellaneous projects included firewood deliveries, 
assisting Lincoln Land Conservation Trust and Codman Community Farms, 
snow removal, and litter pick-up. 



96 



AQUIFER PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Palmer Faran (Planning Board Representative) 

Peter Guldberg 

Joan Kimball (Conservation Commission Representative) 

Edward Rolfe 

Tara Tracy 

John Kimball, Co-Chair 

Andre Vagliano, Co Chair 

The Lincoln Aquifer Protection Study Committee was appointed by 
the Selectmen to study the Town's aquifers and identify threats to 
their purity. 

The Committee identified leaking homeowner fuel storage tanks as 
the major threat to Lincoln's public water supply and focused its 
energies in 1990 on identifying regulatory strategies to address the 
threat of groundwater contamination. 

Research performed by the Committee identified over three hundred 
buried homeowner tanks in Lincoln. The average age of the tanks 
identified was 25 years, with 10% of the population exceeding 40 
years. Studies performed by the EPA and other agencies show that 
homeowner tanks exceeding 20 years of age develop a significant risk 
of leakage. Cleaning up a fuel oil leak can be extremely expensive 
for the homeowner. Leaking tanks in Lincoln could also endanger the 
local water supply forcing the Town to either clean up its 
contaminated aquifers or secure an alternative supply. 

After surveying the local legislation of over 100 Massachusetts 
municipalities, the Committee voted to recommend that the Town adopt a 
By-Law requiring the removal of all tanks reaching the age of 20 
years. The By-Law would give homeowners almost four years to comply 
with its removal provisions. 

The Committee plans to hold a public hearing on its By-Law in 
February of 1991 and present the By-Law to the Town at the 1991 Annual 
Town Meeting. 



97 



THE LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Robert C. Brannen 

Paul Brooks 

Margaret P. Flint 

William A. King, Secretary 

Gwyneth Loud 

Samuel G. Mygatt 

Paul J. Svetz, Treasurer 

Robert H. Webb 

William G. • Constable, Chairman 

In the twentieth anniversary of Earth Day, we do well to remember 
E.F. Schmacher's adage "Small is Beautiful." As it approaches its 
fourth decade, the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust remains an 
effective, efficient and creative private conservation organization 
without any full-time paid staff. Paying only youthful summer trail 
workers, the Land Trust has succeeded by drawing upon the deep well 
of Lincoln' s " talented citizenry. From the past, names such as 
Kindleberger, Cannon, Brooks, Allen, Swift, Marsh, Wales, and Preston 
conjure untold hours of envelope stuffing and engineering as well as 
agriculture and acquisitions. One of the most tireless and unsung 
heroes of the Land Trust, John Loud, passed away this year. The 
memorial fund in his memory compliments his decade of service as 
Treasurer. 

More than ever, today's members are relied upon to provide 
administrative services as well as creative leadership. In this 
regard, the current Treasurer merits especial recognition for the 
many, many hours spent maintaining the financial records of the Land 
Trust. Kudos, too, to Nathalie Rice, whose outlines provide a 
backbone for the forthcoming guide to Lincoln's conservation lands, 
as well as to all those who have provided written and verbal 
materials for the guide. In addition, stipends from the William 
Preston Memorial Fund made possible research for the guide by Lincoln 
native Amy Wales and Harris Roen (formerly chief ranger for the 
Conservation Commission). This summer's trail crew, Bo Lemire, Matt 
Moss and Will Rizzo illustrated, once again, that this Town can grow 
its own trail workers. 

To date, over 300 donations to the Flint's Field acquisition have 
been received, deposited, and acknowledged by Land Trust volunteers, 
working closely with Bisty Donaldson of the Flint's Field Conmittee. 

A vital trail connection was secured this year with the donation 
of a key parcel of land by Irene and John Briedis. Many thanks are 
given to the Briedis' and Tim Taylor, who contributed invaluable 
assistance in the transaction. 

This year, the Land Trust found itself the gadfly In the 
community discussions concerning mosquito spraying. Despite having 
such colorful scientific names as A. vexans and C. perturbans , the 
Land Trust decided that mosquitos should not be generally sprayed on 
Its land unless there exists a significant public health risk. 



98 



The Land Trust continues to encourage the use of more than twenty 
miles of trails which it maintains on private land. The Land Trust 
Trail Map remains available for a nominal cost at Town Hall and local 
businesses. As use of Town trails continues to increase, we urge 
townspeople to contact the Land Trust with any suggestions for 
improving the trail system within the Town. 

The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust is proud that its 
accomplishments are sustained largely through the efforts of 
volunteers. Contributions of suggestions and efforts ranging from 
trail maintenance to acquisitions are as valuable, and as fervently 
requested, as financial contributions. We encourage your 
participation in the use and improvement of our conservation system. 



99 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
Lincoln Land Conservation Trust (excluding 1989 Conservation Fund) 



Harvard Trust 


39,875.67 






Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


10,149.42 






Fidelity Cash Reserves 


18,419.96 






Jean W. Preston Memorial 


12,658.04 






Securities 


1,120.00 










82,223 


09 


Received: 








Contributions: 


9,472.00 






Sale of Trail Maps 


1,278.00 






Dividends 


408.17 






Rent 


100.00 






State of MA (Rt. 2 ROW) 


507.67 






Flint's Fields Donations 


11,667.65 






Lincoln Conservation Fund 


319,631.80 






Interest: 








Harvard Trust 


1,036.21 






Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


794.61 






Fidelity Cash Reserves 


1,437.58 






J. M. P. Memorial Fund 


987.83 






Lincoln Conservation Fund 


3,893.87 






- 




351,215 


.44 


Expenses : 








Wages & Supplies 


5,199.87 






Equipment & Repairs 


632.92 






Insurance 


661.12 






Printing & Postage 


949.27 






Legal, Filing Fees, Misc. 


173.00 






Social Security Taxes 


641.51 






Mowing 


120.00 






Conservation Guide Expenses 


813.25 






Transfers to 1989 Conservation Fund 


40,056.77 










49,247 


.71 


Balance: 12/31/90 








Harvard Trust 


15,094.50 






Fidelity Daily Income Trust 


10,944.03 






Fidelity Cash Reserves 


19,857.54 






Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 


13,649.92 






Securities 


1,120.00 






Lincoln Conservation Fund 


323,525.67 










384,191 


.66 



100 



1989 Conservation Fund (Flints' Field Fund) 



1939 Donations & Interest 533,308.85 
Payment to Town of Lincoln 

(11/14/89) 51,677.08 

Balance: 12/31/89 481,631.77 

1990 Donations & Interest 306,049.90 

Payments to Town of Lincoln 

(3/21/90) 76,593.00 

(7/1/90) 387,563.00 

464,156.00 

Balance: 12/31/90 323,525.67 



101 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Giles Browne 

Buzz Constable 

Susanne Werner-Ross 

Lee Harrison, Co-Chairman 

Raymond Johnson, Co-Chairman 

During 1990, the Housing Commission directed its efforts 
primarily at consolidation, both in the improvement and maintenance 
of our current stock of housing and in evaluating the legislation 
proposed to give Lincoln a Housing Authority. 

The Housing Commission has continued to work with other Town 
Boards and committees on: 1) ensuring the af fordability of Battle 
Road Farm units; 2) negotiating for affordable units at the proposed 
Ryan development; 3) contributing to the planned Town-Wide Conference 
in October 1991; and 4) discussing proposed changes in the accessory 
apartment by-law so that units could "count" as affordable. 

Operations 

The Commission has undertaken to review all Town-owned housing 
for each unit's capital needs and the application of income 
guidelines to each tenant in order to determine the appropriate 
rent. The first goal is designed to minimize the Commission's being 
in the crisis-control business and to maximize our ability to plan 
ahead for capital improvements. The major obstacle in this process 
has been that the Town budget does not permit the Commission's 
maintaining a capital reserve for our properties, so such 
improvements must come out of each year's current budget. The 
Commission and the Finance Committee have been discussing how best to 
manage this situation. 

The second goal is aimed at achieving a more standardized policy 
in leasing Town-owned housing. Our properties have been acquired 
over a long period of time and under varying circumstances. A number 
of tenants have lived in our housing for a number of years at a fixed 
rent. The Commission has begun a system of review for each tenant to 
determine the terms of occupancy for each, as well as the applicable 
rent under the newest guidelines for our area. The Commission has 
gone to some pains to be fair and to maintain strict confidentiality 
in this process. 

1. This was the first year of operation of two new properties of 
the Housing Commission, 10 Mill Street and 65 Tower Road. The 
tenants in both houses have been very pleased with their situations, 
but both have had problems which are predictable in a new structure. 
Ten Mill Street, which was built by students at Minuteman-VoTech, has 
not proved to be as heat-efficient as was hoped, and that has been a 
disappointment for both landlord (the Town) and tenant. In both 
situations, the tenant and the Commission have worked together to 
resolve what problems there were, and we look forward to a year of 
efficient operation In both. 



102 



2. The year has seen several changes at the Codman Farmhouse. 
Residents In the congregate housing have been very helpful in making 
suggestions for improvements and repairs in their order of 
importance, and the Commission has been addressing those one at a 
time. As far as the farmer's apartment is concerned, the Commission 
and the Selectmen made a policy decision that the apartment was not 
strictly includable in the stock of affordable housing, as the intent 
of creating it was to provide a place for the Codman Community Farms 
farmer to live rather than to add to the Town's stock of affordable 
housing. The Commission entered into negotiations with CCF to 
determine the best way to provide housing for the farmer while at the 
same time protect the Town's best interest in having a regular income 
from the property. A particularly troublesome snag developed when it 
was discovered that the farmer's apartment had not been deleaded in 
time for the new tenant to move in. Through an enormous cooperative 
effort on the part of many in CCF and in the Town government, the 
deleading was accomplished in record time. 

3. The Housing Commission's Clerk has undertaken to maintain 
current lists of capital improvements needed for each property and to 
rank them in order of priority. These lists will be the basis for 
our establishing a plan for orderly capital Improvement, given the 
constraints of our budgeting process. 

4. An illustration of the crisis-control phenomenon was provided 
this year by our discovery of a number of major capital Improvements 
which needed immediate attention at our property at 75 Tower Road. 
One of the Commission's original properties, it had had no real 
assessment in years, and once that process was initiated, it was 
clear that a coherent plan for this property was desperately needed. 

5. This year was the first full year of employment of our Housing 
Clerk, and many of the Commission's efforts this year would have been 
impossible without her. She has served as an important link between 
our tenants and the Commission, and has been able to monitor the 
details of maintenance, renewals of leases, and tenant concerns with 
aplomb. 

Proposed Legislation 

In July, the Governor signed legislation which would permit 
Lincoln to convert the Housing Commission into a Housing Authority at 
the March Town Meeting. The Commission and the Board of Selectmen 
were surprised at the wording of the legislation, which was 
substantially changed from what was originally proposed, and seemed 
to be less clear. The Commission and the Board of Selectmen met with 
officials at the Executive Office of Communities and Development in 
order to ask what the implications of the new legislation would be if 
accepted by the Town. Our principal concerns revolved around how the 
Commission's function would change if it became a state agency and, 
therefore, no longer a Town Board; under what regulations would we 
operate, how would staff time be allocated, who would actually own 
the properties, who would manage them, how could we account for time 
spent serving the Town as opposed to time spent on state activities, 
etc. Overriding all of this was the plain fact that the state had no 
money for programs, and was unlikely to have any in the foreseeable 

103 



future. We decided that, since there were no state funds to miss out 
on, we could afford to take the time to have our legislation 
redrafted and to have our administrative questions answered with some 
certainty. At that point, the Commission can come to the Town with a 
clearer proposal than the current version of the legislation affords. 



104 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Gabriel Farrell 

Leona Charapeny 

Robert L. DeNorraandie, Chairman 

1990 has witnessed a significant amount of activity on several 
fronts. The challenges raised have been dealt with efficiently by 
Pat Allen, Water Department Supervisor, together with Richard Milton 
and John Logan, Water Department employees. Frank Emmons, Town 
Engineer, has offered timely assistance particularly in dealing with 
the State Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). 

The status of projects mentioned at the 1990 Town Meeting is as 
follows: 

* Emergency water regulations - The proposed Amendment of 
the Town's General Bylaw, to provide the Water Commissioners 
with authority to enforce mandatory restrictions in the event 
of a water emergency, was accepted by the Attorney General. 

* Auxiliary Power at Flint's Pond - This project has been 
put on hold. Based upon adequate emergency sources of water 
(Wayland and Lexington together with the Town's wells) and 
other factors which came up after the article was presented, 
the Commissioners requested reconsideration of the DEP 
requirement that Lincoln install an auxiliary power system at 
Flint's Pond. 

* Route 2 Improvements - The Lexington Road section is 
complete. Work upon the Bedford Road intersection is currently 
underway and expected to be completed by early summer, 1991. 
Additional upgrades between Bedford Road and Crosby's Corner 
are not yet underway. However, the Commissioners have begun to 
consider distribution system improvements in this area. 

* Coiman North Well Site Testing - The prolonged pump test 
plan was approved by DEP and the testing was completed in the 
late fall. Final reports have not yet been received. Further 
information should be available by 1991 Town Meeting. 

* Flint's Pond Filtration Study - A designer selection 
committee met with several engineering firms interested and 
qualified to complete an analysis of filtration requirements at 
Flint's Pond, in particular, and for Lincoln's water supply in 
general. The firm of Weston & Sampson was selected and is 
expected to issue preliminary findings early in 1991. The 
results of their review and analysis will be critical to the 
future direction of water distribution in Lincoln. 

As mentioned at the 1990 Town Meeting, federal water quality 
regulations are taking a major portion of the Commissioners' 
attention. 



105 



With respect to the recently promulgated "Surface Water 
Treatment Rules", the Commissioners proposed to the DEP that it will 
be able to meet the criteria for avoiding filtration treatment of 
Flint's Pond. Extensive daily monitoring of water quality has been 
implemented. The results will be incorporated into the Weston & 
Sampson study. Also the work accomplished by the Lincoln Aquifer 
Protection Committee will be included in an overall Watershed 
Resource Protection and Management Plan, which must be submitted to 
the DEP by January 30, 1991. 

The Commissioners feel strongly that this careful approach to 
the determination of filtration requirements is appropriate. The 
studies and analysis being undertaken will enable them to develop a 
response specifically tailored to respond to the Town's needs. 

During the summer of 1990, Lincoln school officials expressed 
concern over the level of lead in the water in the Lincoln Public 
Schools (Smith, Brooks and Hartwell) . In conjunction with the 
Lincoln School Committee, the Commissioners undertook a testing 
program to determine the source. The results were of the "good 
news/bad news" variety. The "good news" was that the source of lead 
was determined to be local and not coming from the general water 
supply. The "bad news" was that the source is uncertain. 

Increasing the general level of pH in the system did not seem 
to resolve the problem. This action did, however, generate many user 
complaints about water quality. As a result, pH levels were reduced 
to traditional levels. The Commissioners continue to work together 
with the School Committee on this matter which remains high on our 
agenda. 

While the pace of new residential development appears to have 
slowed, the Commissioners met with several individuals and developers 
to discuss the supply of water to new houses or developments. 

The general administration of the Water Department has improved 
greatly during the past year to eighteen months. A summary of 
activities required on a daily or periodic basis has been developed 
to address continued maintenance of adequate supply, pumping capacity 
and distribution facilities. Significant efforts have been 
undertaken to ensure timely record keeping. As we deal more and more 
with federal and state regulatory authorities, such administrative 
efforts are critical in supporting our points of view. 

Looking forward, the issues enumerated above will continue to 
require our attention: future supplies, water quality/filtration, 
watershed protection and management, and Improved distribution 
systems. The Commissioners, in considering these matters, hope to 
continue to be able to provide quality drinking water as well as 
adequate fire protection at a reasonable cost to the Town. 



106 



Statistics as of December 31, 1990 





Beginning 










of Year 


Additions 


End of Year 


Miles of water main 


52.6 


0. 


56 


53.16 


Hydrants in use 


445 


8 




453 


Gates in use 


632 


18 




650 


Blow-offs 


53 


- 




53 


Services in use 


1,585 


8 
1989 




1,593 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



56.7 million gallons $188,553 
80.6 million gallons $266,397 



1990 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



49.8 million gallons $180,749 
80.5 million gallons $285,469 



107 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Vincent R. DeAmicis, Superintendent, Department of Public Works 

I am pleased to report to Lincoln residents some of the 
Department's accomplishments of the past year. 

1. 89 trees were removed from roadside. 

2. 239 tons of salt and 2,554 tons of sand were applied to 
Town roads. 

3. Codman Road was re paved. 

4. 612 tons of hot top was put down at various locations. 

5. 900 ft. of sewer pipe was laid at Berais Hall. 

6. 139 miscellaneous work orders were completed. 

7. The sediment pond at Trapelo Road was cleaned out. 

8. The driveway at 65 Tower Road was paved and the yard 
landscaped. 

9. Wall repairs were made at Route 125. 

10. The volley ball court at the Codman Swimming Pool was 
built. 

I wish to thank everyone for their cooperation and support given 
to me in my new position as Superintendent of the Department of 
Public Works. 



108 



PLANNING COMMITTEE FOR THE 1991 TOWN-WIDE CONFERENCE 

Carolyn Birmingham 

Susan F. Brooks 

Susan Carr 

Rosamond Delori 

Susan Harding 

Myron Kellner-Rogers 

John Caswell, Chairman 

The Selectmen, being very concerned with how and on what Lincoln 
will spend its limited revenues in the future, decided to hold a 
Town-wide conference or "meeting of the town" to discuss Lincoln's 
priorities as we move towards and into the 21st century. They asked 
this Planning Committee to develop such a meeting to be held in the 
fall of 1991. 

The Selectmen gave us four questions to tackle at this conference: 

How do we adapt to change while retaining what we value most? 

Is our highest priority to hold the line on taxes even at the 
expense of current levels of service, or do we decide what 
services we want and then pay for it? 

What areas of interest are our main concerns in the future? 

If we can't afford all our priorities, how do we choose among 
them? 

The Committee was appointed by the Selectmen in late June. We 
met several times in July, August and September, and from September 
to the end of the year, we met with as many of the Town's boards and 
commissions, churches, civic and community organizations, and 
individuals as we could find who wanted to give us input on this 
matter of priorities. The information we gathered Is being carefully 
considered as we form the first outline of subjects for the 
conference. 

In addition, the Committee asked Mr. Glover Mayfield to develop a 
profile of the Town in 1990 - who we are, where have we come from, 
what do we like and dislike about Lincoln, why we moved here and 
when. In the course of this work, Mr. Mayfield has reviewed all the 
statistical data in Town Hall, and with the Committee, has developed 
a supplementary questionnaire which was included with the Town census 
mailing on January 1st, 1991 We believe this questionnaire will 
give us much Insight into what we value most, what we desire changed 
and how, and how we might pay for our future. This information will 
also help the committee shape the format of the conference. 

The initial phase of our work has been primarily that of 
gathering data, ideas, and opinions. The second phase is the actual 
design of the conference. We decided early that a major 
responsibility would be to provide ways in which we could educate 
ourselves and each other about the Town's history, its government, 
and its goals. We recalled from earlier similar conferences on land 
use that one of the things learned was that more than 50% of the 

109 



Town's residents has "turned over" - moved in or out - within the 
previous ten years. If this pattern has continued, then we felt a 
review of what our values have been, how we came to where we are 
today, how Lincoln has functioned in the past, what previous Town- 
wide conferences have accomplished, how Town government works (or 
doesn't, depending upon one's point of view), might well be in 
order. We hope that such an effort will provide us all with a 
renewed sense of community and deeper understanding of Lincoln which 
in turn will lead us to a productive Town-wide Conference on October 
26, 1991. 

This entire effort then comes in three parts: preconf erence 
education, the conference day itself, and post conference activities 
and report. This constitutes a tremendous amount of work and we 
fully intend to draw upon many, many of you who read this report to 
help us. Our education effort alone will encompass not only a 
preconf erence booklet mailed to all households in Town, but we hope 
also to utilize the Lincoln Journal , the Lincoln Review , community 
groups, library facilities, and our cable television community access 
channel to bring to everyone many aspects of Lincoln. We intend to 
place video cassettes of any TV programs produced at the library for 
borrowing, and there is also a conference reference shelf for 
interested people. 

To date, our Town Boards and Commissions have been eloquent in 
that they desire guidance from the townspeople. They worry about: 
the demands today's life places on people and, therefore, whether 
there will be enough volunteers to continue our government as it is 
today; that people new to Town don't feel they can help in Town 
government and are left "outside"; where money to run the town will 
come from and to whom will it be given for what services. They worry 
what Lincoln will be and look like in the future; can ever increasing 
traffic be curbed; will our commitment to open space continue; can we 
achieve more housing that is affordable for our elderly as well as 
our non-elderly; can our schools be made better; will outside 
influences, like Rt. 128, Waltham development, traffic and Hanscom 
Field encroach further upon our quality of life? 

We urge that everyone take a few minutes to reflect on these and 
their own thoughts and visions for Lincoln. Our history of planning 
ahead, of trying to achieve consensus through these Town-wide 
conferences has served us well before and will do so again if all of 
us devote thought to where and how we want Lincoln to go as we enter 
the next decades. Please don't hesitate to contact anyone of the 
Committee with your worries and ideas, and plan to come to the 
conference. We look forward to an interesting and productive day on 
October 26, 1991. 



110 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Pat Asaff 
Edward Ferri 
Wendy Finnerty 
Judith C. F. Gross 
William Shea, Chairman 

Dawn Murphy, Pierce House Manager 

The removal of the Pierce Park elm tree, completed late this past 
summer, has taken one of the Town's truly great treasures. While 
nothing could replace such a magnificent landmark, we welcome 
suggestions regarding future plans for the area. 

The Pierce House continues to be one of the outstanding meeting 
and function facilities in the greater Lincoln area. With 
recommendations from guests at the Pierce House, inquiries are male 
from great distances each year by families wishing the charm and 
elegance that can only be found at this Lincoln facility. 

The ongoing care taken in the restoration and preservation of the 
house and property continues to be totally supported by the income 
from rental functions. This includes $49,393 spent this past fall to 
replace the Lincoln Road drainage pipe through the park. 

Lighting has been installed in the rear parking lot. Some 
further clearing and re-surfacing in the near future will complete 
this vital project. 

The Committee is dedicated to a continuing high standard of 
operation at the John Pierce House. We are grateful for the many 
concerns and suggestions by Lincoln residents. 






Ill 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Martha DeNormandie 

Marjorie L. Holland 

H. Arnold MacLean, Chairman (deceased) 

Agents: Warren F. Flint, Sr. 
Nancy J. Zuelke 

We are deeply saddened by the death of our Chairman, H. Arnold 
MacLean, last August. Arnold served on the Commission for more than 
30 years, steadfast in working toward our primary goal - that of 
preserving the natural beauty and serenity of the Town's three 
cemeteries. We will miss his generous wit and sparkle as he guided 
our planning and overseeing, and will strive to continue under the 
example he set and the legacy he leaves. 

The single page, revised Rules and Regulations for the cemeteries 
are completed, and all current or prospective lot owners are urged to 
pick up a copy at the Town Clerk's Office. 

We wish to thank the Department of Public Works for their help 
and care in maintenance of the cemeteries' grounds. 

In response to the Town's request, and in light of especially 
difficult budget constraints contemplated this year, we have reduced 
by $1,000 the overall budget for the cemeteries, and, additionally, 
have voted to transfer $5,000 from the Cemetery Improvement Fund to 
the Town for the fiscal year 1991-92. 

There were 21 lots sold and 30 interments in 1990. 



112 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Kenneth E. Hurd 

Colin M. Smith 

Mary G. Spindler 

John V7. Carman, Chairman 

The Lincoln Historical Commission was invited to make suggestions 
for the agenda of the forthcoming Town-wide Conference. Following 
discussion, a list of topics was submitted. Members of the 
Commission also attended a general discussion sponsored by the 
Town -wide Conference Committee. 

The Historical Commission, like the District Commission, wishes 
to commend the steady and devoted leadership provided by John W. 
Carman over the past ten years. John died on December 17, 1990. We 
shall miss him. 






113 



LINCOLN HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

F. Douglas Adams 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Palmer Faran 

Kenneth E. Hurd 

Colin M. Smith 

Mary G. Spindler 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

Abigail Congdon, alternate 
Kim Kassner, alternate 

During 1990, applications for Certificates of Appropriateness 
were made as follows: 

1. Two for alterations to houses in the Center District 

2. Two for signs for businesses within the District 

3. Location of a path from the parking lot to the front door of 
the Town Offices. 

In addition, the Commission recommended to the Department of 
Public Works that the Roger Baldwin retaining wall be rebuilt rather 
than backfilled. This is still under discussion. 

There has been discussion with the Selectmen and Planning Board 
about improving the Codman Farm corner of Lincoln and Codman Roads. 
The Historic District Commission recommended clearing brush and 
rebuilding the stone wall. It was determined that Tennessee Gas 
cannot change its installation at the site. 

With the acquisition by the Town of Flint Fields, the Commission 
thought it a propitious time to seek to add to the Center Historic 
District by continuing the District down Lexington Road to the 
Cemetery. There are only two land owners who are interested at this 
time. The Commission is grateful to Town Historian, Margaret Martin, 
for her work in research and preparation of the documents required 
for listing properties in an Historic District. 

It is with sorrow that we observe the passing of John W. Carman, 
our Chairman since 1983, and a member of the Commission since its 
inception in 1981. He had also served as Chairman of the Historical 
Commission. The Town, and we particularly, have lost a devoted 
friend and leader. 



114 



ROUTE 128 COMMITTEE 

Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond 

David Rles * 

Beth Sutherland Ries, Chairman 

In spite of the downturn in the region's economy, development 
activity in the Waltham/Route 128 area continued unabated. 
Construction of Phase 3 of the Bay Colony Corporate Center on the 
Lincoln line was completed, and its owners applied to the Waltham 
City Council for a special permit to build a fourth phase. 
Representatives from Lincoln spoke strongly against granting the 
permit at the Council hearing in September, but the matter had not 
been acted upon at year end. 

The fate of other parcels of land in the vicinity of the Winter 
Street/Old County Road intersection remained uncertain. Boston 
Properties, which had sought to build on the land adjacent to the Bay 
Colony site, apparently relinquished its interest in the property. 
Other landowners pondered the future of their own land. 

In recognition of these uncertainties and the need to develop 
long-term solutions to the traffic conflicts and road configuration 
problems, the committee met with representatives of the Selectmen and 
Planning Board to consider potential land 'uses for the Winter 
Street/Old County Road area close to the Waltham boundary. The 
consensus of the meeting was to ask a select group of planners to 
suggest different land uses which might be appropriate for the 
parcels of land in the study area. The group's ideas are being 
reviewed for their implications and feasibility of any change in 
zoning that might be necessary. 

The spectre of another large-scale project close to Lincoln arose 
in the spring. The U.S. Postal Service launched a proposal to build 
a major postal facility on Smith Street in Waltham close to the 
Trapelo Road/Route 128 exit. Although the location is on the eastern 
side of 128, the resulting round-the-clock traffic would 
significantly impact the flow of vehicles along Trapelo Road. 
Despite fierce opposition from the City of Waltham, plans for the 
facility were approved in December.. 

The committee will continue to monitor development in the 
128/Waltham area and to pursue long-term solutions to the traffic 
impacts which such developments impose on the Town of Lincoln. 



115 



ROADSIDE PATH COMMITTEE 

Rosalind Feldberg 

Sonja Johansson 

Marcia Lee 

Robert Live more 

Cathy Long 

Mark Naiman 

Jim Storer, Chairman 

With traffic in Lincoln increasing, the mission of the Roadside 
Path Committee over the past two years has been to explore relatively 
inexpensive ways to build new paths on sections of busy streets that 
do not currently have them; particularly when such paths provide 
important links between existing paths, conservation areas, etc. 
Unfortunately, no new roadside paths have been built in the last 
decade, and it is unfortunate that Lincoln has roadside paths on such 
a small percentage of its total road miles upon which pedestrians may 
safely pass. 

In the past year, some small progress has been made. The 
Conservation Commission has begun work on a roadside path on the 7/10 
of a mile portion of Codman Road between Route 125 and Lincoln Road; 
additional funds will eventually be required to properly surface this 
path (about $5,000). In addition, plans have been discussed for the 
Lincoln DPW to place a roadside path on the 3/10 of a mile section of 
Route 117 between Route 125 and the first side entrance to the Mt. 
Misery Conservation Area. However, funds are not available at this 
time (about $10,000). 

Finally, there has been considerable discussion of instituting a 
small annual roadside path budget (e.g., $10,000 per year) that could 
be used for small projects such as the Codman Road and Route 117 
projects or be saved over a period of years towards a larger 
project. However, due to the severe budget constraints this year, it 
was decided not to propose this at Town Meeting, but rather to bring 
this issue up at the Town conference next fall. 

Residents who have an interest in roadside paths are encouraged 
to give me a call with your ideas or to join the committee. 



116 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Mark Banks 

Peter Conrad (on leave of absence) 

Suze Craig 

Elizabeth Donaldson, Clerk 

Marsha Gillis 

James Henderson 

Mary Lincoln, Vice President 

Roy M. Raja, Treasurer 

Carla Ricci (interim) 

Clifton V. Rice 

Paul Svetz 

Mary L. Wiley 

Carol Wolff 

Fan Watkinson, President 

Last year was a transitional year for Codman Community Farms, 
Inc. after a challenging agricultural season in 1989. We are happy 
to report much was accomplished during the twelve months to position 
the Farm for a strong decade. 

The Board of Directors started off the year with a two month 
strategy review session that resulted in an updated five-year plan 
and a heightened awareness of issues key to the Farm's long-term 
success. 

The purchase of a bale kicker, two additional haywagons and a new 
mower conditioner allowed the Farm to improve the efficiency of its 
haying operation as its core cash crop. With limited staff, the Farm 
brought in over 10,000 bales of alfalfa and timothy hay from the 100 
acres managed throughout Lincoln. 

In May, for the first time, the Farm and the Codman House 
co-sponsored an outdoor celebration of spring performed by the 
Revels. A sheep dog demonstration, traditional songs and dance, and 
an original performance of Robin Hood entertained over 1000 people 
and brought additional revenue to the Farm through concession sales. 
The annual Harvest Fair and Auction was dampened somewhat by rain in 
comparison to 1939, but the Lamb Barbeque was one of the most 
successful yet. Many thanks to hundreds of people who volunteered 
their time, talent and auction donations. 

In October, the Board hired a new farm manager, Dave Hardy, and a 
farm assistant, Anne Papadopoulos. In the last three months of 1990 
this team has masterminded a plan to rebuild Farm operations for the 
new decade. 

We continue our commitment to the minor breed animals, 
supplemented by other breeds, to build a stronger, naturally raised 
meat program of veal, beef, hamburger, lamb and pork. Purchases of a 
herd of registered Suffolk sheep, and a registered Tamworth boar, 
reinforce our efforts to move toward higher quality registered 
stock. We have begun a lime and fertilization program to maximize 
next year's yield and tractors have already been serviced. 



117 



We are grateful to the Town for repainting the barns and 
upgrading the farm apartment for family use. In addition, the Farm 
now owns a three bedroom house on Bedford Lane through the generous 
gift of Mr. and Mrs. Chester Gajewski and a cooperative agreement 
with Minute Man National Park. This acquisition will help the Farm 
accommodate farm staff in the future and will strengthen its ties 
with Minute Man National Park. 

A nonprofit organization, the Farm relies entirely on sale of its 
agricultural products, supplemented by memberships, donations, other 
gifts and volunteer service. Independent of the Town of Lincoln, CCF 
receives no formal financial support from the Town, except for a 
modest allocation for shared electricity in the Codman Barns. Fields 
are leased from the Town and other private landowners. 

Overall, Codman Community Farms is well poised for a strong 
decade. We are dedicated to our mission to continue the 
three-century tradition of using Lincoln's open lands for productive, 
conscientiously managed farming. Our goal is to produce a model for 
working agriculture for the educational, social and scenic benefit of 
Lincoln and beyond. 



118 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC, 

Balance Sheet 

November 30, 1990 and 1989 

Assets 



1990 



1989 



Current assets: 
Cash 

Accounts receivable 
Inventory 

Total current assets 

Property and equipment, at cost: 
Building 
Structures 

Motor vehicles and wagons 
Farm implements 
Livestock 

Less accumulated depreciation 

Net property and equipment 

Other assets-Invested endowment funds contrib. 



$ 18,976 


i 3,953 


2,213 


1,326 


20,779 


15,026 


41,968 


20,305 


130,000 




14,842 


16,817 


15,602 


15,102 


64,394 


- 52,344 


995 


995 


225,833 


85,253 


44,500 


36,064 


181,333 


49,194 


12,226 


7,456 


$235,527 


-I 76,955 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 



Current liabilities: 

Current portion of equip, loan payable 
Accounts payable 
Accrued expenses 

Total liabilities 

Long-term portion of equip, loan payable 

Fund balances: 

Unrestricted funds 

Endowment funds 

Property and equipment funds 

Total fund balances 



$ 10,884 
4,108 
1,179 

16,171 

3,516 



22,281 

12,226 

181,333 

$ 215,840 

$ 235,527 



9,360 
1,133 
1,000 



11,902 
4,860 

3,543 

7,456 

49,194 

$ 60,193 

$ 76,955 



119 



Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances 
Years ended November 30, 1990 and 1989 

1990 1989 



Operating revenues: 






Sales: 






Hay 


$14,7786 


20,165 


Vegetable crops 


1,422 


13,926 


Livestock 


10,273 


16,690 


Custom work 


1,562 


1,887 


Total sales 


23,043 


52,668 


Dues 


11,246 


5,558 


Garden plot fees 


1,285 


985 


Fair 


12,979 


12,406 


Interest: 


1,394 


1,294 


Rentals 


1,475 




Other 


20 


91 


Total operating revenues 


56,442 


73,002 


Operating expenses: 






Labor and related costs 


25,179 


62,456 


Seed and livestock 


1,974 


11,035 


Fertilizer and lime 


2,436 


5,037 


Repairs 


3,455 


4,339 


Depreciation 


10,681 


9,814 


Feed 


2,043 


4,544 


Fair 


3,922 


3,435 


Rentals 


1,033 


1,133 


Supplies 


714 


2,570 


Water 


1,333 


1,496 


Fuel 


1,313 


1,243 


Insurance, taxes and fees 


730 


760 


Freight and utilities 


618 


318 


Legal and accounting 


1,150 


1,046 


Office supplies and expense 


2,314 


3,204 


Total operating expenses 


58,965 


112,430 



Operating income (loss) 

Non-operating revenue (expenses) 
Unrestricted gift 
Endowments 

Restricted gift - building 
Gain (loss) on disposition of equipment 
Total non-operating revenues 
(expenses) 



(2,523) 



23,000 

4,770 

130,000 

400 

158,170 



(39,423) 



10,600 
1,750 

(67) 

12,283 



Excess revenues (expenses) 
Fund balances at beginning of year 
Fund balances at end of year 



155,647 
60,193 

$215,840 



(27,145) 
87,338 
60,193 



See accompanying notes to financial statements. 

120 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COtlMITTEE 

Barbara Beal 

Debra Haiduven 

Ruth Kramer 

Daniel Spaeth 

Eleanor M. Wilfert, Chairman 

The Committee had one meeting in June. 

It was noted that when the teakettle is being used in the kitchen 
to point the spigot away from the microwave oven, otherwise the steam 
damages the electronic control. 

It has proven to be impossible to purchase matching globes for 
those missing In the overhead lights in the upstairs hall. Another 
solution will be discussed and implemented in the new year. 

The heavy balcony doors were again discussed as was the Handicap 
Parking Space not being clearly marked. 

There Is about $1,900 left from the original appropriation. 

At the next meeting in the near future, the Committee will 
address the problem with the front door. 

There were no other meetings in 1990. 



121 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

William G. Constable, MAPC Representative 

Through the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), Lincoln 
joins 100 other cities and towns in the Greater Boston region to share 
demographic, economic, development, and transportation information and 
plans. In fiscal year 1990, the MAPC continued development of its 
MetroPlan 2000 to provide specifc guidance and assistance for 
environmentally sound economic development within the region. 

Most tangibly, MAPC provides the venue for local input to the 
State's Transportation Improvement Plan, which describes where and 
when highway and other transportation improvements will occur. 
Projects from the current Route 2/3edford Road intersection to 
Sherman's Bridge receive local input through the TIP process. As 
"encouraging economic revitalization" has replaced "growth management" 
as the talisman of land use planning, the MAPC's MetroPlan 2000 has 
provided a consistent regional development framework to aid 
communities in gathering data, assessing their regulatory programs and 
in designating potential growth areas based on available 
infrastructure and local needs. Lincoln has been included in 
MetroPlan 2000 projects assessing such projects as: 

* Local transportation priorities; 

* Water and sewage treatment capacities; 

* Solid waste management and recycling; 

* Demographic forecasts, including age, income, employment and 
housing growth; 

* Regional highway and transit systems; and 

* Open space and resource protection data analysis. 

The Hanscom Area Towns Study Committee (HATS), consisting of 
Lincoln, Bedford, Concord and Lexington, contracted with MAPC for a 
transportation study to develop a coordinated approach to traffic 
management in the area. 

As part of its continuing role to provide relevant data to its 
local members, MAPC made data from its geographic information systems 
available to local officials. Using state of the art computer mapping 
techniques, Lincoln may now receive information in a form which would 
otherwise require substantial capital investment on the Town's part. 

Finally, 1990 saw the MAPC more clearly representing viex^s of its 
constituents in decisions having substantial impacts on the region. 
Lincoln representatives participated in forums having topics as varied 
as the management of the suburban transportation crisis, the impacts 
of the Central Artery / Third Harbor Tunnel project on the region, and 
efforts to improve Boston's economic development through leadership in 
the European economic growth. 

The Town of Lincoln and MAPC continue to work together sharing 
information and ideas which benefit the Town and the region of which 
it is a part. 



122 



LINCOLN PERSONNEL BOARD 

Sam Donnell 
Scott Lathrop 

During 1990, the Personnel Board spent the majority of its time 
updating the Employee Handbook. The Employee Handbook is the 
document that describes benefits and personnel practices for all 
non-school employees who are not under a union contract. The 
original handbook was drafted thirteen years ago and no longer 
reflected the existing practices and current benefits. Working with 
the Selectmen's Office, the Personnel Board codified these practices 
and benefits and presented the updated handbook to employees in June. 

In addition, the Personnel Board continued to fine-tune the 
non-union personnel system that was implemented in 1988. As 
mentioned last year, the Board remains pleased with the consistency 
afforded by the system. This consistency has ensured an 
across-the-board equity in the Town's non-union positions. 

Next year, the Board looks forward to further discussions 
regarding the guidelines for a performance review system. 



123 



Library, Recreation and Schools 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Term Expires 

Bruce Bare Selectmen's Appointee 1993 

Craig Hill Self-Perpetuating 

Barbara Low Elected 199°. 

Mary Newman Self-Perpetuating 

Walter Salmon Selectmen's Appointee April 1990 

Carol White School Committee Appointee 1991 

Doug Harding, Chairman Self-Perpetuating 

OVERVIEW 

Calendar 1990 represented the first full year of operation since 
the re-opening of the new library facility, which received an Export 
Design Award from the Boston Society of Architects. As the table 
below indicates, while overall activity continues to increase, its 
nature reflects some of the changing characteristics of the town. 

Book Other Circul. Circul. Circul. 

Year Collection Materials Adult Children Other #. Audience 

1981 56,214 2,555 45,306 23,659 3778 251 5344 

1936 63,044 2,833 42,173 34,209 9093 293 6468 

1990 69,014 4,080 43,984 44,911 24,331 284 6412 

Calendar 1986 was not only midway in the decade but also was the last 
full year of operation before construction began on the new wing. 
There is an encouraging trend in adult reading, a sharp increase in 
children's reading, and a significant increase in the circulation of 
"other" materials. These include expansion of our collections in new 
directions, such as books on tape, compact discs, and videos. 

TRUSTEES 

During the past year the Trustees have focused on three primary 
issues: a review of basic library operating policies; development of 
a program to upgrade and expand the furnishings of the Library; and, 
development of a preliminary master landscape plan in conjunction 
with the Planning Board. 

The Trustees as a group also experienced change this year. 
Walter Salmon retired as the Selectmen's Appointee after five years 
of service to the Board. We will miss his wisdom and counsel. 

In May Mary Newman stepped down as Chairman, having served in 
that capacity since 1985. During her tenure, the new library wing 
was constructed and many new initiatives in terms of our collection 
were undertaken. We thank her for her past service and her continued 
presence on the Board. 



124 



In the fall the Trustees adopted a new organizational structure, 
which included standing committees on Personnel, Building and 
Grounds, and Programs and Collections. It is hoped that this new 
framework will help to improve Trustee interactions with Library 
staff and various Town boards. 

STAFF 

There was one retirement and one resignation from the staff 
during the year. Audrey Dedinsky retired in August after 15 years of 
dedicated service to live in California. Mary Spindler resigned in 
November as Circulation Assistant, having served ably in that 
capacity since September 1985. Mary is changing career directions 
and we wish her well. 

The Trustees wish to thank the staff as a whole for another year 
of excellent service to the Town. 

PROGRAMS 



There were 234 programs for adults and children during the year, 
with 6,412 attending. As usual the programs covered a broad spectrum 
of topics, ages, and interests. The Friday Morning Book Group, the 
Shakespeare Group, the Wednesday Morning Programs, Movie Nights, the 
Jazz Group, and the children's Summer Program are all alive and 
flourishing. The special program "Night of 1000 Stars" where famous 
residents of the Town read aloud to young and old alike, was a huge 
success. 

The popularity of our exhibits in both the "Gallary" and the 
DeNormandie Room continue unabated, with bookings well into the 
future. 

FRIENDS 

The Friends continue to be a significant source of both 
financial and personal support to the Trustees and the Library. 
Raising money through membership contributions, the monthly booksale 
at Bemis Hall, operation of the copy machine, and sale of note cards 
and book bags, the Friends underwrite the children's Summer Program 
and provide passes to three museums: the Museum of Science, the 
Children's Museum, and the Aquarium. Their volunteers help in many 
ways to make the Library's programs a success. Their support to the 
Library and the Town is invaluable. 



GIFTS 

The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the many contributions made 
to the Library during the year. Of particular significance this year 
were the many memorial gifts received to honor Robert Burnham, Arnold 
McLean and John Carman, each a patron and strong supporter of the 
Library over many years. 



125 



WEDNESDAY MORNING AT THE LIBRARY 1990 

January 10 "Today and Tomorrow" Superintendent of the Minute Man 
National Park 

February 14 "The Carroll School" Thomas W. Needham 

March 14 "Fish Tales" Christopher Basile 

April 11 "Beauty is Small" Phyllis Swift 

October 10 "Elderhostel Bandwagon" Various 

November 14 "Fifty-five Years Later" Diana Abbott 



Exhibits in the Gallery 1990 
January/ February Doug MacDonald 



February/March 
April/May 
May/ June 
July/ August 
August/ September 
September /October 
November 
December 



Lucy Sprayregen 

Marty Rawls 

Francis Plouffe 

Sheila Williams and Roger Gordy 

Lincoln Artists' Foundation 

Lincoln Photographers 

Stephanie Kornfeld 

Ramelle Adams 



Exhibits in the DeNormandie Room 1990 



January 

February/March 

July 

August 

October 

November 

December 



Quilts by Radka Donnell 

Photomontage and Photographs by William Short 

Mixed Media by Caron Smith 

Photographs by Dan Sperduto 

Photographs by Wardell Loatman 

Architectural Photographs by by Suzanna Collin: 

Chicks and Frogs by Suze Craig and Roz Harvey 



126 



STAFF 1990 



Kathy Glick-Weil 
Ellen Sisco 
Lisa Acker Rothenberg 
Amy Ga vails 
Jane Flanders 
Virginia Chang 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Sheila Williams 
Kathy Rushby 
Audrey Dedinsky 

Lynn Chong 
Kathie Brobeck 
Mary Spindler 
Ann Cheney 
Dana Weigent 
Persis Barron 

John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Technical Sarvices Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

Senior Library Technician 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Bookkeeper 

Junior Library Technician 

(January-August ) 

Junior Library Technician (November-) 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant (January-October) 

Circulation Assistant (November-) 

Children's Room Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

(July-December) 

Custodian 

Custodian 



HOURS 1990 



Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 

Tuesday, Friday 

Saturday 

Closed Sundays 

LIBRARY PAGES 1990 



9:00 am to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 6:00 pm 
10:00 am to 5:00 pm except 
during July & August 



Persis Barron 
Ann Cheney 
Joyce Dietmeier 



Ruth Dietmeier 
Jeanne Furcron 
Doria Phelps -Braun 



LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS 1990 



Patty Arena 
Martha DeNormandie 
Eleanor Donaldson 
B. Grim 
Linda Holland 



Jane Langton 
Margaret Marsh 
Bill Poisson 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Ed Williams 



And Special thanks to: 

Friends of the Lincoln Library 

All of the Stars from "Night of 1000 Stars' 

Ingrid Neri 



127 



The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books and 
records to support the collection during the year. They include: 



Jamie Banks 

Ruth Barbarow 

Tracey Barron 

Patricia Bennett 

Diane Berman 

Eric Broadbend 

Ellen Cannon 

Nelson Chu 

Marcia Ciarmaglia 

Abigail Congdon 

Bruce Daniels 

David Donald 

Ralph Dopmeyer 

Diane Fairbanks 

Ross and Laura Finney 

Edward Flint 

Friends of the 

Council on Aging (COA) 

Mary Ann Hales 

Ruth and Norman Hapgood 

Jeanne Healey 

Hubbard Family 



Ann Janes 
Ellie King 
Elizabeth Little 
Dunbar Lockwood 
Ludwig Luft 
Susie MacRae 
People of Matadepera 
Minuteman Home Care 
Merv Moore 
Lennie Moss 
Mary Newman 
Susan Okin 
Roy and Ellen Raja 
Hyacinth Roach 
Nancy Rockwell 
Henry Rugo 
William Schwann 
Tim Taylor 
Bella Wheeler 
Virginia Whitman 



Magazine Gift Subscriptions were received fron the following 
people: 



Kits Culver 
Ruth Hapgood 
Roger Harris 
Betty Little 
Ludwig Luft 
Alice McKennan 
Brad Meyer 



Merv Moore 
Ruth Ragan 
Roy Raja 
William Schwann 
Irving Telling 
Bella Wheeler 
Sheila Williams 



128 



CONTRIBUTIONS 1990 



*Abigail Avery 

*Albert & Barbara Avery III 

Barron Family 
*Barbara Barrow 
*Robert Burnham & 
*John & Eleanor Carmen 
*Charles & Virginia Casale 
*Walter & Barbara Campbell 
*Bradfori & Ellen Cannon 
*Jeanette Dangelmayer 



Robert Leraire 

Lexia Learning Systems 
*Sidney & Inga MacRae 
*Charles Maxon 
*Geraldine Maxon 
*Matthew & Barbara Maxon 
*Alan & Louise McClennen 
*William & Margaret Norton 
*George & Shirley O'Reilly 
*Leopold & Elizabeth Peavy 



Jr 



*Vickt & Robert Dangelmayer *Mary Perry 



*Decatur Hopkins Corp. 
*Barbara Dexter 

Digital Equipment Corp, 
*Geraldine Maxon 
*Elizabeth Donaldson 



Jean Phinney 
Henry Rugo 
*St. Anne's Church Service League 
Margaretta Schmertzler 
Alvin Schmertzler 



*Malcolm & Eleanor Donaldson*Drs. Steven & Lys Ann Shore 



*Robert & Ruth Ann 

Donaldson 
*James & Clair Henneberry 
*Leon & Mary Hester 
*Chester & Ruth Higley 
*Bryan & Yvonne Ivory 
*Sargent & Anne Janes 

Carolyn Johnston 
*Kolmbach Publishing Co. 
*Luke Kramer 

*G.E. & Ainslie Laughlin 
*Rachel Lefkowitz 



Margaret Simon 
*Mrs. Ray Simpson 
♦Augustus & Mary Soule, Jr. 

Ken Stevens 
*Earle & Janet Street 

Kitty Stein 
*W. Royce & Dorothy Taylor 
♦Chester & Marion Wakelin 
*R. Arnold Wakelin & Nancy Hastings 
*Robert & LiLlian Woo 

Orrin Wood 



* Memorial Gifts 



129 



STATISTICS 1990 

General : 

Number of days open 292 
Fines Collected $3,541.11 

Acquisitions : 

Books 

Inventory 1989 67,814 

Purchases 2,999 

Gifts 240 

Total Inventory 71,053 

Discarded or Lost -2,039 

Inventory 1990 69,014 

Books on Tape 

- Inventory 1989 162 

Purchases 47 

Gifts 

Total Inventory 209 

Discarded or Lost -4 

Inventory 1990 205 

Records, Tapes, CD's, and A-V 

Inventory 1939 3,634 

Purchases 324 

Gifts 13 

Total Inventory 4,021 

Discarded or Lost -14 ) 

Inventory 1990 3,875 

Circulation: 

Adult Books 43,984 

Children's Books 44,911 

All Other Materials 24,331 

Total Circulation 1990 113,226 

Programs: 

Adult Programs 63 

Children's Programs 189 

Non-Library Groups 32 

Total Programs 284 

Attendance 

Adult 1,903 

Children 3,868 

Non-Library Groups 636 

Total Attendance 6,412 



130 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Board of Trustees 

Gregory Harney, President 
Ruth Scheer, 1st Vice President 
Carmen Verrier, 2nd Vice President 
John R. White, Treasurer 
Francis S. Moulton, Jr., Clerk 

Joseph Bower 

Robert Brannen 

Jonathan Cohen 

Laurie Dewey 

James Foster 

Robert Frank 

John French 

Meredyth Hyatt Moses 

David Ogden 

Barbara Sisson 

Ruth Scheer 

Barbara Sisson 

Arthur J. Stavaridis (through February 1989) 

Margaret L. Wengren 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT, December 30, 1990 

Gregory Harney, President, Board of Trustees 

Certainly, the highlight of the exhibition year was Odyssey: The 
Art of Photography at National Geographic. It established new 
records for attendance, and generated substantial publicity in the 
print and electronic media. Simply put, it was a blockbuster of an 
event. 

Equally important in its own right was Belief in the 
Underground: The Art of Marcy Hermansader . It too commanded 
exceptional public acclaim, with color features in both the Boston 
Globe and the Boston Herald , with special mention and plaudits for 
the Museum's Senior Curator. 

This high level of media attention is the result of the very 
hard working staff who have built superb relationships with members 
of the press and media, while establishing ever higher program 
standards which merit such attention. 

I am pleased to report this year, as I did last year, that the 
Town's Museum is in a healthy financial condition. The staff and 
Trustees' joint fundraising efforts have paid rewarding dividends in 
keeping us in the black. An example of this enterprise is the "Endow 
a Tree" program. 

Inaugurated as part of the Grass Roots Campaign' 90, it is a 
category of support which recognized DeCordova's spectacular site and 
natural beauty. The 35 acre Park surrounding DeCordova is open and 



131 



free to the public 365 days a year, and visitors enjoy the large 
scale outdoor sculptures exhibited on the Museum grounds. Featured 
are works of contemporary American artists, including those works 
which are site-specific and/or deal with environmental concerns. The 
"Endow a Tree" program allows donors to demonstrate their lasting 
commitment to the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park by helping to 
preserve the parkland which is so fundamental to DeCordova* s special 
appeal. In return, donors receive long-standing recognition of their 
support on a plaque affixed to a special tree on the Museum's grounds. 

The DeCordova Museum School of Art continues to prosper. 
Enrollment at the School is the highest it has been since 1977, which 
was our banner year. The staff continues to attract a top notch 
artist faculty who are attracted by the setting of the Museum School, 
the flexibility of teaching assignments, and the student body. 

Despite the difficulty of raising funds in this state and this 
economy, I am pleased that the Massachusetts Cultural Council has, 
once again, awarded us a major Arts Education grant to continue our 
public sculpture outreach program in the area, this year with the 
towns of Lowell, Westford and Reading. 

I am also pleased to report that the new garage, built at the 
back of the Park, is finished and functions well. 

Our endeavor to attract greater interest in the Museum and its 
programs through the creation of a Board of Overseers is moving ahead 
steadily and with considerable success. To date, over thirty -people 
have been elected as Overseers, who have appreciated this opportunity 
to increase their knowledge of the workings of the Museum and to 
participate in its support in the community. 

In 1990 we moved closer to resolving those long-standing issues 
that have plagued us for so long. The Director and Trustees continue 
to plan a capital campaign that will deal with the deterioration of 
the main building, through repair and expansion for new gallery 
facilities, proper storage space and climate control that will 
continue to attract exhibitions of national caliber and maintain our 
status as a professional accredited art museum. Along with our 
concerns to improve employee benefits and to alleviate the drastic 
understaffing of key Museum operations, we are confident of 
sustaining DeCordova' s momentum in 1991 as one of the finest small 
art museums in America. 



132 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Museum Staff (as of December 1990) 

Paul Mast er-Karnik, Ph.D., Director 
Joan Kennedy, Assistant to the Director 

Administration 

Franco Riello, Accountant 

Sue Atwater, Administrative Assistant 

Ellen Primack, Public Relations Director 

George Vasquez, Photographer 

Anna Holland, Design Assistant 

Barbara Barry, Special Events Coordinator 

Cathy Burns, Function Manager 

Janet Forte, Function Manager 

Barbara Simon, Function Manager 

Barbara Steelier, Research Assistant 

Lise Dalton, Receptionist 

Jeannette Greensteine, Receptionist 

Linda Kenney Vaill, Receptionist 

Barry Higgins, Mail Room Supervisor 

June Ekstrom, Weekend Manager 

Curatorial 

Rachel Rosenfield Lafo, Senior Curator 

Nick Capasso, Assistant Curator 

Lynn Herrmann Traub, Registrar 

Bradford Gonyer, Preparator 

Frank Balduf, Special Projects 

Education 

Eleanor Lazarus, Associate Director, Education 

Linda Foster, School Manager 

Carole Somol, Outreach Coordinator 

Carole Calo, Docent Instructor/Coordinator 

Diana Sherwood, Administrative Assistant 

Amy Terrell, School Store Manager 

Robena Re id 

Gillian Titus, School Store Clerks 

Development 

Denise Trapani, Associate Director, Development 

Susan Kapilian, Assistant Director, Development 

Jeron Comeau, Membership Director 

Deborah Avant, Membership and PR Assistant 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Clerk 

Jane Kennedy, Volunteer Coordinator 

Corporate Program 

Sandra Mongeon, Corporate Program Director 

Bruce Carlisle, Administrative Assistant 

Security Buildings and Grounds 

Steve Burns Robert Little, Manager 

Ed Chisholm Robert Bearchell, Assistant Manager 

Frank Priest, School Custodian 

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LINCOLN ARTS LOTTERY COUNCIL 

Candy Foster 

Lynn Gargill 

Waleska James 

Wardell Loatman 

Kally Kumler, Treasurer 

Stephanie Rolfe 

Lucy Sprayregen 

Margaret Stathos 

Trish Adams, Co-Chairman 

Sandra Grindlay, Co -Chairman 

Twice a year the Lincoln Arts Lottery Council (LALC) receives 
funding from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. The funds are 
divided into two groups: (1) Arts Lottery funds which support arts, 
humanities and cultural activities of benefit to the community; and 
(2) Performing Arts Student Series (PASS) funds which enable 
Massachusetts school children to participate in live performing arts j, 
events. 

The principle objectives of the Massachusetts Cultural Council 
are (1) to promote and maintain the vitality of existing cultural 
resources, (2) to insure the continued contribution and value of these 
resources to the Commonwealth, the local communities and their 
residents, and (3) to involve as many citizens as possible in some 
aspect of cultural activity. Since Lincoln receives a relatively 
small allotment of lottery funds, the Lincoln Arts Council has adopted 
a policy of awarding grants to applications that will very directly 
benefit the community of Lincoln. 

For the Spring 1990 funding cycle of the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council, the Lincoln Arts Lottery Council received an allocation of 
$1755 in Arts Lottery funding with an addition of $1086 held over from 
the previous cycle ($2341 total). The LALC received $310 in PASS 
funding with $336 held over from the previous cycle ($646 total). 

The following Arts Lottery applications for Spring 1990 were 
approved: 

Codraan Community Farm, support for Spring Revels $ 499.00 

DeCordova Museum, support for Art in the Park 100.00 

Hartwell School, dance and movement program 200.00 

Friends of the Lincoln Library, concert and dance 100.00 

Lincoln Arts Council, museum catalogs for schools 140.00 

Lincoln After School Music Program, concerts 300.00 

Lincoln PTA, Halloween Haunted House 400.00 

Lincoln Public Library, children's summer program 350.00 

Arts Lottery Grants Approved: 2089.00 

Plus administrative expenses approved: 88.00 

TOTAL ARTS LOTTERY FUNDS APPROVED 2177.00 

Arts Lottery funds to be held over: 664.00 



138 



The following PASS applications for Spring 1990 were approved: 

Brooks School, North Shore Music Theatre 235.00 

Hartwell School, Act Tunes, Concord 400.00 

Pass Grants Approved: 635.00 

Plus administrative expenses approved: 11.00 

TOTAL PASS FUNDS APPROVED: 646.00 

For the Fall funding cycle, 1990, the LALC received an 
allocation of $885 for Arts Lottery funding with $664 held over from 
the previous cycle ($1549 total available funds). The allocation for 
PASS funds was $307 with nothing heldover. $15 in administrative 
expenses were approved. 

The following Arts Lottery applications for Fall 1990 were 
approved: 

Benefit Street Chamber Players, concerts in Lincoln 150.00 

Mary Crowe, vocal performance of modern music 150.00 

Support for anthology on 19th c. art, lecture 250.00 

Performance of "Shake 'N Bake" for C0A 100.00 

Very Special Arts Massachusetts, arts festival 50.00 

TOTAL ARTS LOTTERY FUNDS APPROVED: 700.00 

Arts Lottery Funds to be heldover: 849.00 

There were no PASS applications for the Fall 1990 cycle. PASS 
funds to be held over ($307-$15): 292.00 

LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL 

In addition to funding provided by the Commonwealth, the 
Lincoln Arts Council has initiated fundraising events of its own and 
has sponsored Town-wide cultural activities. The funds generated by 
these activities are not subject to state restrictions. 

In February, the Lincoln Arts Council presented its major fund 
raising event, "An Evening with Monet." A lecture entitled "Behind 
the Scenes of Monet in the 90 's" was given by the guest curator of the 
Museum of Fine Arts exhibit, "Monet In the 90' s." A reception and 
buffet dinner followed the lecture. 

In late August, the Lincoln Arts Council sponsored its third 
annual "Open Studios" tour. Eleven local artists including painters, 
photographers, sculptors, a ceramic artist, a silk screen designer, 
and woodworkers opened their studios to the public. 

In September, the Council sponsored an exhibit of paintings and 
sculpture by Lincoln artists at the Town Library. Prizes were awarded 
to Jack Foley and Gerald Foster. 



139 



Fundraising, Evening with Monet, 1990 $4682.00 

Fundraising, Open Studios Tour, 1990 544.00 

Fundraising total: 5226.00 
Less expenses (printing, postage, food, honorarium): -2837.61 

Prize money awarded to local artists: - 150.00 

TOTAL INCOME GENERATED 1990 BY FUNDRAISING: 2238.39 

FUNDS AVAILABLE FROM PREVIOUS FUNDRAISING: 1659.41 

TOTAL AVAILABLE LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL FUNDS: 3897.80 

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS (INCLUDING ARTS LOTTERY): 5038.80 



140 






CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey M. Mudge, Co-Chalraian 
Clare Pinto, Co-Chairman 



The Celebrations Committee is responsible for organizing 
activities for Lincoln's observance of Memorial Day and the 
Fourth of July. The activities for Memorial Day include 
decoration of graves by the members of the American Legion, a 
march to Lincoln's cemeteries at 9 a.m., led by the Lincoln 
Minute Men, followed by a short speech and laying of the wreath 
at the Library. All citizens are encouraged to participate and 
stay for refreshments at Bemis Hall. 

The Fourth of July is a very happy day with something for 
everyone. A 2.5 and 4 mile road race starts off the day at 
3:45 a.m. The children's parade follows, and 1990 saw a record 
number of children participating in their decorated tricycles, 
bicycles and various other vehicles. Jim and Ilga Paddock 
served as the Children's Marshals, leading the parade. At 10:30 
a.m. the main parade stepped off from Ballfield Road, with a 
variety of floats and participants representing most of the 
Town's organizations and committees. Many have worked long into 
the night decorating their floats cleverly in order to catch the 
judges' eyes for that most coveted "Best in Parade" ribbon. The 
theme for the 1990 parade was, "Lincoln Looks Ahead," and Susan 
-and Foster Fargo served as Honorary Grand Marshals. Bill 
Munroe, as Head Marshal, was in charge of lining up the floats 
for the parade. As usual, the festival Brass Band and the Nays 
provided the music; the antique cars added class. The fire 
engines from most of the neighboring towns excited the kids, and 
Norman Hapgood made his anticipated annual appearance. After 
the parade, the road race and float awards were announced at 
Smith School, while the Boy Scouts sold food and drink, and the 
children were entertained by a magician. The afternoon brought 
on the tennis tournament and a free swim at the Codman Pool, 
with the Nays playing music from the 60's. From 6-8 p.m., about 
500 people enjoyed the Lobster or Chicken Barbeque while 
listening to the Metro Steel Orchestra. The Lincoln 
Conservation Rangers led a sunset walk, and Diana Ryan conducted 
a model rocketry demonstration as hundreds of people started to 
arrive for the spectacular fireworks display. The fireworks 
went off at 9 p.m. at Codman Field, culminating a wonderful day 
of events celebrating the nation's birthday and the Town of 
Lincoln's spirit of community. 

The Celebrations Committee wishes to thank the volunteers 
who helped with the Road Race, under the direction of Irene 
Rice, and those who helped sell refreshments and T-shirts (which 
are annually designed by Hartwell 4th graders), and all who made 
contributions to the Fireworks Fund. 



141 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Kathleen Coleman 

Liza Evans 

George Seely 

Peter Watkinson 

Rick Wiggin 

John Adams, Chairman 

Debra Haiduven, Director 

Once again this was a year of change within the Recreation 
Committee. Both Monika Duborg and John Walker decided to retire and 
were replaced by Rick Wiggin and Kathleen Coleman. While we will 
miss John and Monika, we are very happy that Rick and Kathleen have 
joined us. In most other respects, 1990 was much like 1989. 

We had another strong summer at the Day Camp, with 143 campers 
for the first session, 148 for the second, and 120 for the third. At 
the pool, we had a total of 219 pool memberships and 119 swim team 
memberships, down slightly from the year before. At the tennis 
courts, we sold 727 tennis stickers, up from 557 in 1989. During the 
year we offered a wide variety of programs ranging from tennis 
lessons and youth basketball to quilting and Tanglewood. 

While the recreation budget is now quite large, most of it is 
offset by revenues from user fees, and the cost to the Town has 
remained constant, at about £40,000, over the last few years. These 
increased costs have been offset by increased user fees and we 
anticipate that this trend will continue. 



142 



STRATS' PLACE PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Mark Banks Myron Ke liner -Rogers 

Becky Bartovics Bruce MacNeil 

Mirasy Beckwith Terri Morgan 

Libby Bradshaw Diane Nockles 

Christina Brown Irene Rice 

Susan Carr Paul Rice 

Rainer Frost Joe Robbat 

Karen Goddard Stuart Rose 

Sherry Hagenian Ron Row 

Mark Hagenian Kathy Rushby, Treasurer 

Tom Hourihan Leslie Vagliano 

Cy Kano Page von Mertens, Coordinator 

Dorothy Kano Peter von Mertens, Coordinator 

Constituted by the Selectmen in November 1988, the Strats' 
Place Playground Committee was charged with the planning and 
construction of a new playground at the Lincoln schools. 

By January 1989, architects were engaged, and committee 
members went to work, orchestrating nearly two dozen fundraising 
events; securing volunteer workers for 2,300 shifts; procuring food 
service and childcare for same; collecting all materials, equipment, 
and tools. The project was financed neither by school monies nor by 
tax dollars but by donations and fundraising events. 

At Town Meeting in April 1989, voters overwhelmingly passed a 
motion to accept the playground as a gift; shortly thereafter, the 
Selectmen designated a site at the south side of Hartwell School. 

Construction began In June 1939, with the 39th Engineers 
Battalion from Fort Devens on hand with heavy equipment and 
substantial support. Graced with fine weather and with the 
appearance of more than 1,000 Townspeople, the playground was 
completed in five days and dedicated to the memory of Mike Stratton. 

Maintenance of the playground remains the responsibility of 
the Committee for three years. The playground is to be used 
exclusively by the Lincoln public schools when school is in session; 
It is open to the public after school, on weekends, and during school 
vacations. 



143 



LINCOLN -MATADEPERA EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 

Joseph B. Greeson 

Joseph L. Greeson 

John Quelch 

Betty Smith 

John Walker 

Melissa Meyer, Co-Chairman 

Susan Stason, Co-Chairman 

On June 27, 1990, six students between the ages of 15 and 
18 arrived from Matadepera, Spain, to begin the second summer in our 
exchange between Lincoln and Matadepera. During July our guests were 
hosted by the families of Jennifer Barry, Elizabeth Beatty (Sudbury), 
Joe Greeson, Nicholas Meyer, Sarah Puffer, Ed Rice and Jamie Todd. 
They were entertained during their stay with an official welcome 
barbeque at the Town Pool, the Lincoln Fourth of July celebration and 
Boston fireworks, overnight trips to Cape Cod and New Hampshire, 
historical and cultural tours of the Boston area and visits to local 
universities. 

On July 18th, participants Jennifer Barry, Elizabeth Beatty, 
Alexandra Caravajal, Marcy Chong, Ed Rice and Jamie Todd travelled to 
Spain to spend three weeks with their new Matadeperan friends. They 
returned to Lincoln with great enthusiam for the experience. 

The Lincoln-Matadepera Exchange Committee feels the summer high 
school exchange program is firmly in place. We would like to 
encourage other Lincoln families with appropriate age children to 
consider hosting or sending their own on this economical foreign 
exchange for the summer of 1991. Lincoln students will travel to 
Spain at the end of June. 

We are continuing to explore a professional art exchange for 1992 
and possible pen pal relationships between students In our schools. 
We are always looking for additional ways to strengthen our 
connections. 

The Olympic Games to be held in Barcelona in 1992 present an 
opportunity for adult and/or family visits between the two 
communities. The sistership is available to all Lincoln residents 
and group or individual exchanges are possible. We hope greater 
numbers of Lincoln residents will continue to take advantage of this 
program. 



144 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

John Perry 
Harriet Relman 
Allen Rossiter 

During 1990, the following Bemis programs took place: 

On April 27 Dr. Vartan Gregorian, President of Brown 
University, spoke on the topic, "de Tocqueville's Individualism 
Revisited". This lecture was given at Bemis Hall, a new location for 
the Bemis Lectures usually held at Brooks Auditorium. 

On October 12 the Bemis Trustees and the Lincoln Garden Club 
co-sponsored a lecture by Roger Swain, Science Editor of Horticulture 
Magazine and host of PBS' "The Victory Garden", entitled "Fruit Trees 
for Your Backyard". 

On December 14 the Harvard Glee Club under the direction of 
Jameson Marvin presented a program of Folk, Renaissance and Christmas 
Music to a capacity crowd which overflowed Brooks Auditorium. 

All programs have been taped and are available at the Library. 



145 



LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Maria Churchill 

Ed Brogan, Hanscom Representative 

Jennifer Donaldson 

Michaela Lipsey 

Guy St. Sauveur, Hanscom Representative 

Leslie Vagliano 

Henry Morgan, Chair 

1990 has been a particularly challenging year for the Lincoln 
Schools. However, In spite of many obstacles, progress continues to 
be made to improve our schools and to regain some of the momentum 
which had been lost over many years of enrollment drops and tight 
budget restraints. 

During the year, we lost four key members of the 
administration, one by retirement and three who accepted other jobs. 
Dr. Gregory N. Ciardi submitted his resignation in the Spring and 
leaves on December 31, 1990 to become Superintendent of Schools in 
Maynard, MA. Diane Nockles retired at the end of the 1989-90 school 
year after over thirty years of service to our schools, the last five 
as Principal of Hartwell. Lois Taylor accepted an important position 
in Washington after eight years as Director of Pupil Services. Joan 
Connolly, Principal of Brooks School for two years left to be a 
Principal in Gloucester. These four key educators will be missed, 
but we are fortunate to have a strong and seasoned core of teachers 
who have shown outstanding dedication to their students' educational 
needs. 

Dr. Ciardi made significant contributions in his brief two and 
one half years. In particulalar, he has revised and strenghtened our 
goal setting process and our budgeting cycle. Under his leadership, 
the School Committee and the Administration discussed and set before 
the public budget guidelines in June for the following year's 
budget. The budget that is developed by the Administration over the 
summer and early fall reflects the educational priorities established 
by the Committee. Dr. Ciardi instituted other educational procedural 
reforms that have helped us better understand and deal with many very 
difficult issues facing us. 

Dr. Bernard Huntley has been hired as the Interim 
Superintendent while a search is conducted for a permanent person for 
the leadership of the schools. The Committee is reviewing its 
Mission and Vision Statements to guide its search. Ms. Nockles was 
replaced by Joanne MacManus after an exciting and thorough search. 
Ms. MacManus comes to us after many years as an Elementary Principal 
in the Boston School System. Dorothy Olsen was appointed Interim 
Director of Pupil Services. In her short tenure in the position, she. 
has made an assessment of our Special Education Programs and has 
proposed major organizational changes to better meet the needs of the 
students at both campuses. John Crawley was appointed Interim 
Principal at Brooks after many years as a Middle School 



146 



Principal in Needhani. While we have been able to keep up our 
momentum with these new educators, the Committee has an imposing 
challenge to find outstanding leaders to carry us forward. 

We also lost the services of two Committee members, Sally 
Bobbitt and Wendy Kameny. Each served three years on the Committee 
and made significant contributions. Ed Brogan, one of two 
representatives from Hanscom, was transferred to Texas. His presence 
is missed as well. We welcomed two new members to the Committee, 
Leslie Vagliano and Maria Churchill. Michaela Lipsey has announced 
her intention not to stand for re-election in March, 1991, after six 
productive years on the Committee. We thank her for her devoted 
service to our children. 

Our management of the Hanscom Schools continues to be a source 
of strength and the relationship with the Air Force provides the 
entire system administrative strength which would be lacking in a 
smaller system. In December, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held to 
celebrate the opening of new facilities at Hanscom. The major 
renovations and building of new space has been a five year project 
brought to fulfillment this school year. We now have an excellent 
physical facility to house the Elementary and Middle Schools at 
Hanscom serving over 700 students. Ron Hadge and Sally Webber, 
Principals, and their teaching staffs are to be thanked for guidance 
and help during a difficult construction period. Stability at 
Hanscom has helped us through this year of changes. 

At the March, 1990 Town Meeting, a resolution was passed under 
the Article in which the School Committee seeks the support of the 
Town of Lincoln for participation in the METCO program. This 
resolution directed the Committee to hold a meeting within three 
months to review the program with citizens of the Town. An open 
forum was held on June 9, 1990, attended by over three hundred 
people, to share views on the role of METCO in a program of 
excellence for Lincoln Schools. 

Five major issues were identified as items for further study. 
In the fall, the School Committee appointed five task forces made of 
volunteers from the June meeting to report back to the Town on 
November 15. These five task forces were: 

1) Prepare a vision for our schools which will outline an 
approach to achieve academic excellence for all students in the 
schools. A draft statement was prepared after extensive 
consultation with all constituencies. This draft endorsed the 
need for a multi-cultural, multi-racial program. Further work 
needs to be done to extend the draft statement to operating 
programs. 

2) A second task force was asked to plan the appropriate METCO 
program for Lincoln. While some helpful recommendations were 
maie, there was no clear consensus on all points of a program. 
Their recommendations included the following: 1) reduce the 
current METCO participation level due to financial constraints 
and space limitations; 



147 






2) continue to admit METCO children at the Kindergarten level; 

3) integrate the afternoon Kindergarten level; 4) call for a 
non-binding referendum to determine the acceptable level of 
Town expenditure for the METCO program. Suggestions were made 
to extend the METCO program to other racial minorities in 
Boston. Due to restrictions of time, the Task Force was unable 
to complete its charge. Areas which need further study 
include: the METCO staff, closing the academic gap, the 
disparity of SPED usage by METCO children, and ensuring that 
the program fosters integration. In addition, on-going program 
evaluation criteria need to be developed. The School 
Committee, which has the ultimate responsibility for decisions, 
was helped by the task force deliberations. 

3) The third task force was charged with assessing the costs to 
Lincoln of the current METCO program. They developed a 
financial methodology for looking at costs. Their conclusion 
was support for the incremental cost method which has been 
used, but they identified many more costs which should be 
included in the analysis. Most important, the task force 
demonstrated the necessity of projecting costs into the future 
of decisions made in any given budget year. Particular concern 
was shown for the implications of Lincoln and METCO enrollment 
decisions and projections for the need for future classroom 
space. The analysis suggested that the current METCO 
enrollment policy needed to be changed given Lincoln's 
increasing enrollment and limited classroom space at Brooks and 
Hartwell Schools. If current class size policy and METCO 
enrollment policy are maintained, the Task Force predicted an 
increase in school expenditures of approximately $5 million 
over a five year period. 

4) The fourth task force studied staff training, specifically 
as it relates to METCO students by studying staff development 
over the past several years in the Lincoln Public Schools, 
conducted a review of the literature surrounding minority 
achievement, and studied staff development in other communities 
within and outside the Greater Boston area. The educational 
staff has been directed to look at the recommendations of the 
Task Force and to develop implementation plans. 

5) The fifth task force looked at ways in which better 
relationships can be established among families from the Boston 
and Lincoln communities. They recognized the importance of an 
active role for families in the effective education of 
children. Specific ideas and plans were proposed. 

While these discussions of METCO were extremely time consuming,' 
they were long overdue. The Committee will be proposing policy 
changes which respond to the work of the task forces and respond to 
the current situations with respect to enrollments, costs and space. 
These policy changes are under discussion by the Committee as this 
report is being prepared. 

Looking to the future, the School Committee recognizes the 
enormity of the job ahead. We must define our vision, we must find 



148 



new leadership, we must face the realities of financial restrictions, 
we must find a way to rejuvenate a physical facility that has not 
been maintained adequately and we must gain the support of the entire 
community in these tasks. It is clear that a vision of the best 
schools desirable may not be the best schools possible. We strongly 
believe that the education of our children for the world of the 
future is our highest priority. We must convince the citizens of 
Lincoln that is a high priority for them. 

By the attendance at our meetings, it is obvious that many care 
about our job. While we can never expect unanimous agreement on our 
decisions, we would like to engage in open discussion of the issues 
and join together at what may have to be the best set of 
compromises. With a group of the best teachers in Massachusetts and 
a citizenry that wants excellence in education, we can go a long way 
toward our shared goals. 



149 



Preeti Bhatia 
Megan L. Budds 
Marcia Renee Calandra 
Craig W. Champion III 
Landis Collins 
Jennifer L. Corio 
Adrei da Costa 
Dena S. Farrier 
Nina Alexandra Feldman 
Earle M. Ferguson 
Patricia Fiscale 
Eric John Fraser 
LLana Gordon 
Christopher P. Grinnan 
John Stephen Hales 
Alisa R. Hunter 
Matthew A. Knox 
Maegan Ann Maloney 
Danielle Elena Marcus 
Lindsay H. McConchie 
Neil G. Miller 
Ann Willetta Moss 



CLASS OF 1990 

Aidan Edward Goldsmith Murphy 

Nathalie Nopakun 

Julie Kathryn Onigman 

Rachel Ann Panetta 

Margaret S. Perera 

Michael O'Connor Phillipps 

Amanda Jordan Piece 

Thiele Robinson 

Marc J. Schubmehl 

Danielle Shallah 

James Michael Sirapkins, Jr. 

Nadia N. Sinclair 

Frances Isabel Smith 

Dorothy Theresa Stara 

William G. Stanton III 

Amanda B. Stason 

Canio G. Tartaflia 

Jason Erik Taunton-Rigby 

Danielle J. Tucker 

Nathan Kahler Turner 

Willie T. Winston, Jr. 



150 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Bernard Huntley 
Juliana Marchessault 
Karen Mazza 
Dorothy Olson 
Robert Budds 
Carroll Blake 
Joanne McManus 
John Crawley 
Sally Webber 
Ronald Hadge 



Interim Superintendent of Schools 
Business Manager 
Director of Curriculum 
Director of Pupil Services 
Director of Plant Operations 
METCO Coordinator 
Principal, Hartwell School 
Interim Principal, Brooks School 
Principal, Hanscom Primary School 
Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: The Office of the Superintendent . is open Monday through 
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.. 



151 



SCHOOL 



Hartwell 



Brooks 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ENROLLMENT AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1990 



GRADE 


SECTIONS 


K 


4 


1 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


4 

Total: 


3 
16 


5 


2 


6 


2 


7 


2 


3 

Total: 


2 
8 



Lincoln Campus Total: 
* ( ) ■ METCO students 



STUDENTS 


75 


(12) 


64 


(11) 


63 


(12) 


65 


(13) 


56 


(9) 


48 


(9) 


40 


(6) 


40 


(8) 


43 


(8) 



TOTALS 



323 (57) 



171 (31) 
494 (88) 



Hanscom Primary K 

Pre-1 

1 

2 

3 



Total: 



Hans com Middle 



4 

1 

5 

5 

_5 

20 

4 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
16 



Total: 

Hanscom Campus Total: 

Lincoln Public Schools Total: 

CASE and Outside Placements - Lincoln: 

Hanscom: 



88 
15 
83 
96 
95 



76 
72 
58 
46 
62 



12 
21 



377 



314 

691 

1185 



152 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPORT 

Joanne Fraser 

Geraldine Nogelo 

Frederick Pryor 

Phyllis Rappaport 

William C. Hewins, Vice-Chair 

Sarah Cannon Holden, Chairperson 

Amidst increasing fiscal anxiety at the national, state, and 
local levels, Lincoln-Sudbury has maintained, under the able 
leadership of Dr. Matthew King, a steady and optimistic course. 
While many cost-saving measures were implemented, evidence of 
excellence at L-5 continues. 

Although an 8% budget increase would have been necessary to 
maintain level services, we requested only a 3.4% increase of which 
approximately 1/3 represented fixed and mandated costs. The partial 
override in Sudbury required the virtual elimination of this increase 
— $282,000 (3.1%) were cut in instructional ($39,000) and athletic 
($20,000) supplies, audio-visual ($6,500), Sudbury Visiting Nurses 
($10,000), transportation ($46,605), one SPED tuition ($18,000) and 
in professional staff ($148,160). These cuts resulted in the third 
consecutive year of level funding for L-S. 

Other system-wide cost saving measures have been implemented. 
These Include reductions in out-of-school SPED placements, 
cooperative bidding programs, Boston Edison's ENCORE program as well 
as integration of L-S West into the main campus, teaching of a health 
course by administrators, and reliance on in-house maintenance. 

At a FOCUS session in October, Lincoln and Sudbury residents, 
including a six person panel, shared with the School Committee 
thoughts on ways to reach out into the communities to ensure 
continued financial support. In an effort to respond to the 
suggestions, the "L-S Community Program" was established. Through 
it, music programs, art displays, faculty and student talks have been 
scheduled at community centers. 

While considerable energy must be expended on saving money, the 
school committee, administration and staff, work hard to ensure that 
students continue to be well served and to excel. 

15% of the senior class was recognized as National Merit 
Scholarship semi -finalists (8) or with commendations (26); the 
average verbal SAT was 478 and math 551, 10 to 15 points higher than 
our neighboring schools; "Much Ado About Nothing", "The Martian 
Chronicles", and "The House of Blue Leaves" were performed; the 
Dalton Trophy for overall athletic excellence was won for the fourth 
time in five years; 20 young women students from Lincoln, Sudbury and 
Boston, with 5 teachers held their own Young Women's Leadership 
Conference to focus on racism and special issues for women at L-S; 
students and faculty participated in trips to France and Italy; a 
student won the youth competition of the BS0; and, as another kind of 
measure, 9 of the 23 students from neighboring high schools accepted 
by Harvard in the last 3 years were from L-S. The Teachers 



153 



Association invited several community leaders to participate in its 
"Teacher for A Day" program where each participant taught various 
classes for the day. 

The School Committee decided to place more emphasis on the 
music program; to direct a thorough evaluation, with recommendations, 
of the English curriculum; to make small, but significant adjustments 
to the process for establishing a student's GPA; to establish a 
library benefactor program; to eliminate the home economics 
department; to transfer law and economics courses to the history 
department; and to establish an Athletic Eligibility Review Board. 

Through efforts in the communities and within the school, 
students and faculty contributed over 1800 hours of voluntary 
community service through the MLK project; a school store was stocked 
by the Boosters; and $60,000 were raised by L-SPO, the Boosters, 
Friends of Music and the Scholarship Fund. 

A mock courtroom was built with funds from the Sudbury 
Foundation, an academic awards and achievements display case was the 
gift of the Class of 1990, and over the summer, many in-house 
improvements were made to the building itself. 

Dr. King met with 7th and 8th grade parents in the fall to 
answer questions as they consider high school options for their 
students. 

$23,00 in scholarship aid was awarded to the Class of 1990. 

As part of the spring evaluation of Dr. King, the School 
Committee reviewed its goals set in the fall. Each of us was 
impressed with the progress made by the administration and staff in 
reaching for or attaining these goals. While we recognize the many 
capable people who contributed to these successes, we credit Dr. King 
with his inspirational leadership style. 

With such strong and effective leadership we report that L-S is 
weathering these fiscal times as a vibrant and healthy place. 



154 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 

The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with 
the elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on Monday, March 26, 1990, and 
certifications of the results were received from Nancy J. Zuelke, 
Town Clerk of Lincoln and Jean M. MacKenzie, Town Clerk of Sudbury as 
follows : 

Lincoln Sudbury Total 

Phyllis Rappaport 975 1,575 2,550 

Frederick Pryor 694 2,162 2,475 

Scattering 000 000 000 

Blanks 875 2,600 3,475 

2,432 6,068 8,500 



155 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Dr. Matthew King, Superintendent/Principal 

As the new educational leader of the High School last year I 
explained in the Town Report that my biggest challenge was to develop 
a budget that maintains a fundamental educational program within the 
fiscal constraints that we faced. Writing a year later I am both 
pleased and proud by the extent to which the Towns have responded to 
our requests. Though the High School is different in that programs 
have been reduced (the result of the loss of thirty-one faculty and 
staff positions over three years), it continues to be a first-rate 
high school. Indeed, during the past year we have worked hard to 
strengthen the school in a number of areas. 

The comprehensive assessment of the English curriculum, involving 
alumni, faculty, students and parents, was completed and the 
committee's report accepted by the School Committee. The 
recommendations in the report will be addressed and implemented 
beginning with a revision of the Freshman program. The assessment of 
our mathematics curriculum as well as the K-8 curricula in both 
Sudbury and Lincoln, continues through the generosity of a grant from 
the Sudbury Foundation. A unique feature of this effort is the 
degree to which teachers from the three systems have been able to 
meet and candidly discuss how we can better articulate the teaching 
of mathematics. 

Another area where the school is changing is in music, where our 
new faculty member, Nick Costello, has already done a wonderful job 
attracting students to our bands, ensembles and choruses. Over the 
years the program had been cut back to the point where last year the 
school only had a half-time music teacher. By now having a full-time 
teacher we have been able to begin building the music program back to 
a respectable level. The decision to strengthen our music program 
was made in the context of the budget guidelines endorsed by the 
School Committee. The following guidelines represent the priorities 
we paid attention to in building a budget: 1. Promotion of 
cooperative and caring relationships between adults and students. 
2. Respect for human differences. 3. Satisfaction with excellence 
only, particularly in academics. 4. Preserve the centrality of the 
classroom. 5. Distinguish between what is essential to learn by 
completion of high school and what is desirable to experience. 6. 
Seek reasonable class size in core academic areas. 7. Maintain 
athletic and extra-curricular activities. 8. Continue to strengthen 
the fine arts over time. 9. Maintain diversity with the faculty. 
10. Strengthen mainstreaming opportunities for students with special 
needs. 

During the past year we have tried to be candid about our needs 
and prudent in our decisions. The faculty, staff, and I will 
continue to work very hard to build on the school's valued traditions 
and to maintain, with your support, a quality high school for the 
community and its young people. 



156 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES —CLASS OF 1990 



Jessica Brooke Allen 
Wendy Alsen 

Gretchen Brooks Anderson 
Jennifer Lynn Anderson 
Jeffrey R. Arnold 
Matthew Anthony Arpino 
Son/a Marie Austin 

Christine Marie Babcock 
Kenneth CharLes Bekampis 
Michael Armstrong Bellizzi 
Lynne Dawson Berry* 
Keith Anthony Berton 
Shana Leigh Birnbaum* 
Juliana Marie Blaser 
Alyssa Bleck* 
Stephen William Blumberg 
Kevin Patrick Bohne 
Emily Sara Bonn 
Gregory Jon Bornstein 
Jennifer Borr 
Charles Joseph Bowser III 
Carol Elizabeth Brewer 
Melissa Lyn Brown 

Darlene Campbell 
Kiera Elizabeth Campbell 
David Paul Campobasso 
Christopher Caputo 
Jenny Marie Cavallerano 
Dawn Michelle Cavanaugh 
Adam Scott Cefalo 
Michael Louis Cerulo 
Nicole Yvonne Charlton 
Cornishe L. Cherrie 
Nicole Chester 
Karen Allison Cleary 
Retha Coetzer- 
Kimberly Elizabeth Cohen 
David Andrew Connors 
Ellen Christine Consales 
Stephanie Elizabeth Cope 
Sheila Coughlin 
Andrew Nelson Craig 
Christanna Greta Crittenden 
Kristen Jean Cudraore 
David Adams Cutler 



Julie Darsch 
Megan Heather Day 
Erika Robin deLone 
Laura Christine Denessen 
Eleni Christine Digenis* 
Timothy James Dolan* 
Robert Willis DuPuy 
Cindy Nicole Dunham 
Jessica Lee Dusenbury 

Blake Edward Ellavsky 

Alan Erskine 

David Michael Evans 

Nicole Lynn Fabrizio 
Jonathan Matthew Fallon 
Jon Martin Farr 
Julie Alyce Finigan 
Stacy May Flannery 
Sharon Flier 
Jason W. Flynn 
Matthew Vincent Fonte 
Joshua Fox 

Ellen Marie Fredrickson 
Christina Freeman 
Catherine Elise Friedman 
Troy Kenneth Fryatt 
Bryan George Fryklund 

Michael Louis Gefteas 
Jennifer Lynn Goldman 
Peter Gonnerman 
Richard Tobey Gonnerman 
Lizanne Marie Gonzalez 
Karen Grace 
John Gracey 
Rashien Javaar Grant 
Elizabeth Marie Greene 
Joseph Lee Greeson 
Robert Alexander Gruber 
Carrie Gustafson 
Jane Louise Guy 



157 



Giesla Hahn 

T. Noel Hall 

Michele Lee Hammer 

Jeanette Hammer 

Brian Mark Hannan 

Kathleen Janet Hayden* 

Jonathan Wayne Hebb 

Eric Hendrickson 

Kimberley Highfield 

Peter L. Hillman 

Kelly Lee Hoar 

Cornell Horton 

Dawne Howes 

Diana Denise Hughes 

G. Curtis Hunne well, II 

Wendy Suzanne Ireland 

Clarence Johnson 
Ernest Johnson 
Susan C. Johnson 
Valeria Maria Jose 

Alexander P. Kabat 

Christine Po-Hsuan Kao* 

Jason Andrew Kates 

Tareef Kawaf 

Robert Crandell Keeman, Jr. 

Jeffrey Drew Kelble 

Angela Gail Kennedy 

Gerard Kimble 

David King 

Ginger R. King 

Jnmes Edward Ki.ng III 

Sara Klein 

Heather Koenig 

Robert Kopf 

Adam Michael Kreisel 

David N. Krugler 

Zachary Kushner* 

Leonard Kwok 

Cory Travis Lai 

Ian William Laraont-IIavers 

Michelle Laura Leitao 

Marie William Lewis 

Traci Nicole Lewis 

Cassandra Jean Little 

Annamaria Michelle Locsin 

Keith Londres 

Matthew Norton Lovering 



Rebecca MacNeice 

Shauna Ann Maloney 

Andrew M. Marcoux 

Jesse A. Margolin 

Sarah Elizabeth Martin* 

Stacey Martin 

Maximillian Joseph Martinez 

Keith H. Maurhoff 

Kimberley Jean Mayer 

Jonathan McBride 

Ellen Teresa McCarthy 

James Phillip McCloskey 

Douglas N. McDougald 

Maureen McEleney 

David Melzack 

Katherine Juliet Mendoza* 

Kathryn Ann Midgley 

Jeffrey Scott Miller 

Stuart Alexander Scott Moncrieff 

Nicole Moore 

Manuel Mario Morganti 

Chris Tyson Mosch 

Kevin Mullen 

Christopher R. Murphy 

Krista Nadolski 

Todd Michael Nagy 

Rachel Lee Nathan 

Derek Navisky 

Lisa Nichols 

Timothy James Nikula* 

Jodi Anne Nix 

Victoria Saunders Nixon 

Laura Elizabeth Nogelo* 

Elizabeth Anne O'Neill 
Satya P. Obilichetti 
Benjamin Oliszczak 
Susan Anne Olson 
Ryan S. Orris 

Amanda Jane Packer 
Heather Marie Park 
Christopher Patton 
Michael F. Petricca 
Susan Marie Petrovic* 
Keith Alan Piken 
Richard Alvin Plank lit 
Seth Powell 
Margaret Fair Pryor 

Andrea Lee . Quirk 



158 



Dawna Marie Rarasure 
Latarsha Ray 
Astrid Reynolds 
Curtis L. Robinson 
Kimberly Robinson 
Gary K. Rose 

Joshua Warren Rosenblatt 
Linda Alison Rubin 
Brian James Rusch 

Lisa Maria Schirf 
Lisa Marlene Schwartz 
Marika Jane Schwartzman* 
Michelle Louise Sevigny 
Amy Maureen Shields 
Carrie Ellen Shineman 
Amy Jennifer Shluger 
Catalina M. Sierra 
Peter Kenneth Sjolund 
Angelique E. Skigis 
Erik Nicholas Skulte 
Kathryn Alexandra Sliwkowski 
Michele Elizabeth Smart 
Alexander Duncan Smith 
Brian Douglas Smith 
Teri Maria Sonjara* 
Joshua S. Spiewak* 
Stephanie Spiller 
Thomas J. Spit tier 
David Dean Stone 
Rachael Lisa Stone 
Tonya Marie Strange 
David Gordon Swank 
David Adara Swart z 



Sonja Linnea Wadraan 

Erich Waible 

Jessica Wecker 

David Lyle Weiss 

Adam Charles Wells 

Brendon Williams 

Jeffrey Leland Williams 

Philip Brooks Williams 

Thomas H. Williams 

Jennifer Christine Williamson 

Steven Williamson 

Deborah A. Woolley 

Jennifer Jean Workman 

Laurel Elizabeth Wyman 

Tiffany Beverly Young 

Erik Brian Zamkoff 
James Warren Zanzot 
Melissa Maria Zarella 

* Cum Laude 

// Honors in History 

STUDENT EXCHANGE 

Bruno Carneiro de Mecieiros 
Takeshi Hayashi 
Jia Yun Sylvie Lee 
Maria Trabazo 



Tanisha Shevelle Tate 
Richard E. Thornan 
Melissa Marie Thurman// 
Kerri Ellen Tiep-Daniels 
Jay L.A. Torian 
Jenafer Michelle Trahar 
Mary Elizabeth Treacy 
Kyle Martin Turner 

Lisa Maria Van Valkenburg 
Erica Lynn Verville 
Lynn A. Vifquain 
Michael Collins Vivaldi 



159 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1989 



1936 1937 1938 1989 1990 



Lincoln 


172 


153 


123 


99 


98 


Sudbury 


978 


961 


887 


771 


749 


METCO 

(Tuition) 


97 


92 


92 


83 


75 


Other 


13 


14 


10 


13 


9 


TOTAL 


1,260 


1,220 


1,112 


966 


931 


Boys 


618 


601 


557 


478 


453 


Girls 


642 


619 


555 


488 


473 


TOTAL 


1,260 


1,220 


1,112 


966 


931 


9th Grade 


258 


268 


267 


226 


224 


10th Grade 


340 


263 


264 


240 


213 


11th Grade 


335 


351 


255 


261 


237 


12th Grade 


327 


338 


326 


239 


252 


TOTAL 


1,260 


1,220 


1,112 


966 


931 


Tuition Pupi 


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s 25 


20 


25 


32 


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161 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Treasurer's Report 

July 1, 1989 thru June 30, 1990 



Marcia A.. Roehr, Treasurer 



Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1989 



$ 971,755.73 



District Fund 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1989 

Receipts : 

Operating Accounts 

Sudbury Assessment 
Lincoln Assessment 

Total Assessments 
Chapter 70 
Chapter 71 

Transportation FY 90 
School Construction Aid FY 89 
School Construction Aid FY 90 

Total State Aid 
Chapter 188 

Total Chapter 183 
Town of Lincoln Grant 

Total Grant 
Building Rental Revenue 

Total Other Income 

Miscellaneous Income 
Petty Cash Refund 
Tailings 

Total Sundry Income 

Total Operating Receipts 



i 595,496.28 



5,813,727.20 
847,911.72 



707,774.00 

494,300.00 

290,549.00 

52,310.00 

53,661.00 



53,065.00 



100,295.85 



55,000.00 



209,074.36 

1,000.00 

362.97 



6,666,633.92 



1,598,594.00 



53,065.00 



100,295.85 



55,000.00 



210,437.33 
i 8,684,031.10 



162 



Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax $ 315,359.08 

Massachusetts Withholding Tax 293,607.51 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 23,335.56 

Health Insurance 86,405.99 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 240,570.60 

Middlesex County Retirement 83,771.50 

Disability Insurance #1 22,561.92 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 226,295.76 

Credit Union 339,160.83 

L-S Teachers* Association 19,587.50 

Attachments 324.99 

United Way 1,686.00 

Total Deduction Receipts 2,202,717.29 

Total District Fund Receipts $ 10,886,748.39 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND INCOME $ 11,482,244.67 



Disbursements : 

Operating Accounts 

Operating Budget $ 7,985,479.43 

Equipment 110,262.13 

Capital Projects 10,000.00 

Debt Service - principal 150,000.00 

- interest 41,175.00 

Total Budget Disbursements $ 8,297,916.56 

Lucretia Crocker 50,349.00 

School Improvement Council 2,716.00 

Total Chapter 188 Disbursements 53,065.00 

Tovm of Lincoln Grant $ 100,295.85 

Total Grant Disbursement 100,295.85 

Building Rental Revenue 55,000.00 

Petty Cash Advance 1,000.00 

Tailings 333.97 

Total Sundry Disbursements 56,333.97 

To til Operating Disbursements $ 8,507,611.38 



163 



Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax $ 815,359.08 

Mass. Withholding Tax 293,607.51 

Federal Withholding Tax FIOA 23,385.56 

Health Insurance 71,550.55 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 240,570.60 

Middlesex County Retirement 83,771.50 

Disability Insurance #1 22,303.61 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 226,831.76 

Credit Union 389,160.83 

L-S Teachers' Association 19,587.50 

Attachments 324.99 

Uni t ed . Way 1,416.00 

Total Deduction Disbursements $ 2,137,859.54 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND DISBURSEMENTS $10,695,480.92 

Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1990 $ 786,763.75 

EXCESS & DEFICIENCY FUND 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1939 $ 40,000.00 

Receipts 0.00 

Disbursements 40,000.00 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1990 0.00 

TOTAL REVOLVING ACCOUNTS $ 131,015.40 



Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1990 $ 736,763.75 

Cash Balance, Revolving Accounts, June 30, 1990 131,015.40 

TOTAL CASH BALANCE, June 30, 1990 $917,779.15 



164 



LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Balance Sheet 

June 30, 1990 

ASSETS 

Bank of Boston NOW $ (225,687.55) 

Bank of Boston Money Market BID 1,072,710.83 

Baybank Middlesex Money Market 57,144.94 

Boston Safe Deposit & Trust Co. 13,610.93 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 917,779.15 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Tailings $ 130.00 

Surplus Revenue 727,723.10 

Excess & Deficiency Fund 0.00 

Health Insurance 22,742.19 

Disability Insurance #1 7,239.50 

United Way 270.00 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 28,658.96 

Chapter 183 - Lucretia Crocker FY90 200.46 

Block Grant FY 89 637.36 

GA\D Grant FY 90 5,749.81 

Special Ed Technical Asst. Grant 3,693.25 

Specialnet FY 89 233.17 

Computer Training Grant FY89 333.40 

P.L. 89-313 FY90 1,250.00 

P.L. 94-142 FY90 26.46 

Donations 10,517.67 

Capital Outlay 8,519.92 

Computer Contract 52,510.57 

Booster Club 13,610.93 

METCO FY 90 449.46 

Cafeteria (3,454.89) 

Nursery School 13,592.77 

Athletic Fund 8,134.96 

Athletic User Fees 21.00 

Adult Education 2,189.22 

Library Copy Machine 5,706.39 

Building Use 5,730.77 

Lost Books 1,162.72 

Vandalism 50.00 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $ 917,779.15 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 



School Bonds, @ 6.1% $150,000 
payable August 15, 1990 - 1993 



$ 600,000.00 



TOTAL DEBT $ 600,000.00 

165 ============= 



Scholarship Fund 
June 30, 1990 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1989 $ 207,533.16 

Receipts - principal 0.00 

- interest 10,389.70 

Disbursements - awards 18,000.00 

$ 199,972.85 
Funds Transfer to Lincoln- 
Sudbury . Scholarship Foundation (199,972.83) 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1990 $ 0.00 






166 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Sherry Adams 
Andrew F. Hall, III 
Mary Spindler 

The Lincoln Scholarship Committee works with Lincoln high 
school seniors in need of financial aid. We meet with, and interview 
each student in an effort to help them identify and properly assess 
their upcoming college expenses. At the same time, we advise them of 
possible scholarships, grants, and other loans that might be 
available to them. 

The goal of the committee is to help these students bridge the 
gap between their present financial resources and the total estimated 
cost of attending college during the Freshman year. During the past 
few years, it seems that the gap between resources and expenses has 
continued to widen. Opportunities for part time employment and work 
study are nonexistent with budgetary constraints at colleges and 
universities. 

In the June 1990 graduating class, the Committee assisted four 
students with financial aid, totalling $8,065. These funds were 
raised through the annual appeal to Lincoln residents, from 
investment income on the portfolio managed by the Commissioners of 
Trust Funds, and from charitable bequests. 

This year, the Fanny F. Campbell Academic Achievement Award was 
presented to Tina Kao for her outstanding academic achievements at 
the Lincoln-Sudbury High School. An award of $250 was presented to 
Tina at the June graduation ceremonies. 

The annual appeal for funds from Lincoln residents continues to 
be a success and the capital base continues to grow. Hopefully, with 
our expanding school population, the Lincoln Scholarship Fund will 
continue to grow and be financially in a position to provide the 
support needed for all Lincoln residents in need of assistance. 






167 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 
OFFICERS 

Patrick J. Mullen, Jr. , President 
David A Bagley, Treasurer 

DIRECTORS 

John A. Dolan, Jr. 
Virginia K. Kirshner 
M. Clare Mullen 
Gerry Nogelo 
Rosalind S. Spiller 
Marilyn Thurman 
Rita M. Zarella 

MEMBERS 

Dorothy H. Bagley 
Sherry Dakss 
Maureen A. Dolan 
Eileen McEleney 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, through the generous 
contributions of the citizens and business organizations of Lincoln 
and Sudbury, and the staff of Lincoln -Sudbury High School, in 1990 
increased the endowment 25% to $459,825. This significant increase 
is a direct result of the launching of a capital campaign in 1939 
which has as its goal a $1,000,000 endowment. 

The Sudbury Foundation has established a matching gift program 
where it will match the first $1,000 of each personal gift up to 
$50,000 per year for each year of the campaign. As a result of the 
capital campaign, Dr. An Wang through the Wang Foundation, has 
established five, four year scholarships of $5,000 per year per 
student. Additional direct scholarship money is raised by 
Springthing which is held the second Saturday in May. The success of 
Springthing is directly attributable to the large group of friends 
who so generously donate their time and talents. 

A faculty committee chooses the recipients based on criteria 
established by the Fund Committee, and in 1990, $28,000 was awarded, 
up from $18,000 in 1939. 

The fund is available to any graduate of Lincoln-Sudbury with 
definite college plans and financial need. 



168 



The recipients of the 1990 scholarship awards were: 
Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarships 



Lizanne Gonzales Christopher Murphy 

Traci Lewis Catalina Sierra 

Brian Hannon Laurel Wyman 

David King Philip Williams 

Katherine Mendoza Jennifer Williamson 

Memorial Scholarship Awards: 

Sudbury Foundation Scholarship Christanna Crittenden 

Frank Heys Memorial Scholarship Rachel Nathan 

Joan R. Kirshner Essay Award Shana Sirnbaum 

John K. Wirzburger Memorial Scholarship Thomas Spittler 

Bramwell B. Arnold Physics Award Joshua Spiewak 

Lily T. Spooner Memorial Scholarship Matthew Lover ing 

Dr. An Wang Scholarships 

Michael Cerulo Nicole Charlton 

Stacy Flannery Jason Flynn 

Latarsha Ray 

For information concerning the Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, 
Inc., call the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School at (508) 443-9961 
or Pat Mullen, (503) 443-3158. 



169 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 
STATEMENT OF REVENUE, EXPENDITURES & FUND BALANCE 



Revenue: 



1990 



1989 



Contribution Pledges 


$ 23,150 


$ 175,600 


Unpledged Contributions 


32,893 


1,175 


Matching Funds 


56,065 


-0- 


Investment Income 


23,405 


1,881 


Total Revenue 


$ 135,513 


$ 178,656 


Expenditures: 







Scholarships Awarded - 1990 $ 15,500 $ -0-2 
Scholarships Awarded - 1991 12,500 -0 - 



Total Scholarships 



$ 29,000 



* -O 



Operating Expenses 1 



$ 13,972 $ 8,865 



Total Expenditures 



$42,972 $ 8,866 



Net excess of Revenue over 
Expenditures 

Fund Balance-Beginning 

Transfer of predecessor fund 



$ 92,541 $ 169,790 
$ 169,790 -0- 

$ 197,493 -0- 



Fund Balance -Ending 



$ 459,824 $ 169,790 



2 Predecessor fund awarded $18,000 in 1989 

1 Contains one time expenses of Approx $5,500 associated with 
Capital Campaign 



170 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 







Term 






Expires 


Acton 


John W. Putnam 


1991 


Arlington 


John P. Donahue 


1991 


Belmont 


Linda Frizzell, Chairperson 


1992 


Bolton 


Peter Stalker 


1993 


Boxborough 


Kenneth Whitcomb 


1991 


Carlisle 


William Churchill 


1991 


Concord 


Lawrence D. Lorah 


1992 


Dover 


Position Vacant 


1993 


Lancaster 


Fred A. Reed 


1991 


Lexington 


Nyles N. Barnert, Secretary 


1990 


Lincoln 


Harold A. Levey, Jr. 


1992 


Need nam 


Mark Tobin 


1992 


Stow 


Mary E. Cutler 


1993 


Sudbury 


Lawrence Ovian 


1992 


Wayland 


Elaine Sweeney, Vice-Chairperson 


1993 


Weston 


John M. Tucker 


1993 



Minuteman Tech students and graduates have had a great year 
capitalizing on what national research shows about learning — that 
many students can develop much stronger academic skills in applied 
learning programs. For example, Henry Thomas, valedictorian of the 
Minuteman Tech, Class of 1986, was also valedictorian of the 
University of Lowell, Class of 1990. As a physics major, he compiled 
a 3.98 cumulative grade point average, which was the highest among 
the 1,621 members of his class. In the fall of 1990 he began a 
doctoral program in Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Henry Thomas entered Minuteman Tech eight years ago from the 
Brooks School in Lincoln. He was fascinated by computers and decided 
to come to Minuteman so he could spend half of his time working with 
computers while participating in the rigorous Prep Tech college 
preparatory program. 

His interest in computers gave way to an Interest in physics as 
a result of studying with George Taliadouros, Minuteman Tech physics 
teacher who was named the 1938 outstanding science teacher in 
Massachusetts by the National Science Foundation. Excellence in 
academics is very important at Minuteman because approximately 20 
percent of Minuteman Tech graduates continue their education in 
college. 

The excellence of Minuteman' s technical programs is illustrated 
every year by the achievements of our students. During 1990, 
Minuteuian Tech students won 19 medals in the state Vocational 
Industrial Clubs of America Skills Olympics — more medals than any 
other school. In June, Minuteman sent eight of its state winners to 
compete in the national Vocational Industrial Clubs of America Skill 
Olympics in Oklahoma City. Barbara Craddock of Lincoln and Kelly 
Komola of Watertown came home with national Gold and Silver medals, 
respectively, in the Commercial Baking event. 



171 



Retailing student Kelli Mason of Stow won first place in the 
Civic Consciousness category at the state Distributive Education 
Clubs of America Conference and traveled to San Jose, California to 
participate in the national DECA Conference. 

Horticulture student Craig Desjardins of Stow placed third in 
the National Future Farmers of America Landscaping Competition in 
Kansas City, Missouri. At the Society of Manufacturing Engineers 
National Competition in Dearborn, Michigan, a team of four Minuteman 
Technology students placed fourth in the Robotics and Vision Team 
Event. The team consisted of Jonathan Rayne of Waltham, Alex 
Taliadouros " of Dracut, Michael Baker of Lexington and Brett Pacewicz 
of Needham. 

In athletics during 1990, Minuteman Tech's high achievers 
include Scott Brown of Arlington and Shirley Marsh of Stow who were 
named to Colonial Conference Basketball AL1 Stars First Teams. Alan 
Ferrone of Soraerville was named the Most Valuable Hockey Player of 
the Commonwealth Conference League. Swimmer Bob Gardner of Arlington 
was named a Commonwealth Conference All Star. Soccer players Will 
McCarthy of Stow and Rob Fisher of Sudbury were named Colonial 
Conference First Team All Stars. In golf, Robert Holt of Needham was 
Colonial Conference League champion. 

Football player Walter Carraichael of Arlington was selected by 
the state's coaches to play in the National Football Hall of Fame 
All-Star game. He was also named a Colonial Conference Baseball All 
Star. Brian Healy of Medford was named to the Colonial Conference 
All League Football Team. In field hockey, Pam Sisson of Acton, 
Shirley Marsh of Stow, Shannon Cronin of Arlington and Darlene Hebert 
of Stow were named Colonial Conference All Stars. Shirley Marsh and 
Pam Sisson were also named Colonial Conference All Stars in softball, 
along with Lisa Baia of Arlington. Hanna Scheichenost of Belmont was 
a Commonwealth Conference Tennis All Star. 

A number of Minuteman Tech staff members also earned honors 
during 1989-90. Baking teacher Norman Myerow was named Chef of the 
Year by the Massachusetts Chefs de Cuisine and was inducted into thei 
American Academy of Chefs during the Group's national convention in 
New Orleans. 

Minuteman' s Technology/Me iia Director Earle Hancock received the: 
Pathfinder Award from the Massachusetts Educational Technology 
Council. The award was presented to him by State Education 
Commissioner Harold Raynolds and State Board of Education Chairman 
James Crain in recognition of his pioneering work in the effective 
use of new technologies in schools. 



172 



Nick Papas who teaches physical education at Minuteraan and 
coaches basketball at Melrose High school was named Division 1 Coach 
of the Year by the Boston Globe * Minuteman electrical instructor 
James Kennedy was appointed by the Massachusetts Department of 
Education to its Electrical Technology Advisory Board. Health 
Occupations teacher Geraldine McGrann was elected Vice-President of 
the Health Occupations Educators Division of the Massachusetts 
Vocational Association. 

On the Minuteman Tech campus, the school's high school and adult 
post graduate construction students completed work on a 6,000 square 
foot Child Care Center for M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. Construction 
costs were paid by Lincoln Laboratory as part of a leasing 
arrangement. Dedication of the Center took place on September 19, 
1990. 

The Child Care Center is being operated by a non-profit 
organization established by M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory and serves 52 
youngsters ranging from 6 weeks to 5 years old. Minuteman Tech child 
care students helped with the decorating and equipment selection for 
the center and are involved in cooperative and other learning 
experiences there. The Center's extensive grounds will be maintained 
by Minuteman Tech horticulture students. 

During 1990 almost 300 middle school students and their teachers 
from Arlington, Bolton, Lancaster, Lexington, Needham and Stow took 
advantage of an invitation issued to all the District's middle 
schools to spend a "Technology Day" at Minuteman exploring the 
wonders of the school's laser and robotics facilities. Over the 
summer 20 science, math and special education teachers from 
Arlington, Carlisle, Dover, Lexington, Needham, Stow and Uayland 
participated in a special 2-day hands-on "Future Technologies 
Project" at Minuteman, sponsored by the school's Technology Division. 

More and more adults from the Minuteman Tech District are taking 
advantage of the opportunity to enroll in the school's daytime adult 
technical training program. Residents of the District's 16 member 
towns may enroll in this program without charge i_f they have 
previously not had public vocational-technical training. The program 
has been especially useful to those who attended high school before 
our communities provided strong vocational-technical service and for 
some persons forced to return to an increasingly competitive job 
market by a change in their family economic status. 

For those who can't attend classes in the daytime, there are 
hundreds of evening courses available at Minuteman which provide 
beginning and advanced technical training. Courses are also offered 
in a wide variety of other areas. Information about these programs 
may be obtained by calling Minuteman Tech's Community Education 
Office at 617-861-7150. 



173 



Here are some facts about the Minuteman Tech budget: 

* State expenditure comparisons are erroneously high for 
Minuteman because proper credit is not computed for tuition enrollees 
from non-member towns. Therefore, Minuteman provides local finance 
committees with more accurate comparison estimates. 

* For the second year in a row, Minuteman has level-funded its 
total budget. While an individual town's assessment can rise 
significantly depending on its share of annual enrollment, the 
Technical High School staff has been working diligently to help 
member towns' cope with difficult financial times and still provide a 
high quality of learning service to area citizens. The balance 
between fiscal coping and quality is a difficult one because 
providing students with strong integrated academic and vocational 
skills is becoming increasingly critical in the competitive job 
market. 

* The Minuteman School Committee has focused strongly on our 
fiscal partnership with towns. For example, in August of 1990, the 
Committee lowered assessments to member towns when state aid to the 
District was reduced less than we had anticipated. In turn, 
well-informed finance committees have continued to recommend fair 
support for vocational-technical education. Thousands of citizens 
benefit economically and have their lives enriched by this 
partnership. 

During 1990, Dover's member of the Minuteman Tech School 
Committee Robert Warner resigned. No one has yet been appointed to 
take his place. 



174 



MINUTEMAN TECH - CLASS OF 1990 



There was one member of the graduating Class of 1990 who wai 
from Lincoln: 



Mary L. Leslie 



Health 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1990 



TOWK 



94 



93 



92 



91 



TOTAL 



Acton 


8 


17 


8 


11 


10 


54 


Arlington 


49 


36 


38 


36 


33 


192 


Belmont 


6 


10 


7 


11 


10 


44 


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" 5 


1 


1 


2 


1 


10 


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3 


4 





2 


2 


11 


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1 








2 


3 


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3 


3 


5 


5 


6 


22 


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1 


1 


1 








3 


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5 


4 


6 


7 


6 


23 


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3 


14 


7 


13 


14 


51 


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1 


3 


3 








7 


Needham 


12 


10 


7 


13 


4 


46 


Stow 


- 3 


15 


9 


10 





37 


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4 


10 


10 


10 


4 


33 


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8 


7 


1 


7 


5 


23 


Weston 


3 


1 





2 


1 


7 


Tuition 


22 


31 


34 


45 


16 


148 



TOTAL 



136 



168 



137 



171 



114 



729 



175 





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L78 



VITAL STATISTICS 

40 Births, 31 marriages and 39 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1990 as follows: 8 



Date of 
Birth 



1989 
July 
Nov. 
Dec. 



1990 



30 
14 
20 



BIRTHS 



Name of Child 



William Crosby McKenney 
Beatrice Dabney Watts 
Sean Lee Po 



Names of Parents 



James & Janis McKenny 

Robert Watts & Deborah Kelsey 

John Po & Ada Lee 



Jan. 8 Nicholas Sartelle 

Hargreaves -Heald 
Jan. 31 Katie Anne Delaney 
Feb. 2 Leslie Dickinson Bargraann 
Prescott Wyman Blackler 
Hannah Corey Burk 
John Robert Terino 
Joshua Paul Bohn 
Peter Mark Diabakerly 
Kathrine Elizabeth Briedis 
Samantha Jane Rarice 
Cyrus Keane Elias 
Kristen Jade Lee 
James Alexander Storer 
Samuel Garvey Johnson 
John Tylko, III 
Mary Elizabeth Panetta 
Aliza Bethany Strock 
Christopher Ryan Jacques 
Gregory Hugh Green 
Michael Lopaka Foley 
Meghan Alexandra Murray 
Sophie Hunt Hollingsworth 
Kelsey Lane Hauser 
Alexandra Cronin Georges 
Kathleen Elizabeth Johnson 
Kelley Davis Smith 
Jonathan Kirk Waukonen 
16 Mark Nenneraan Robson 
16 Hannah Grace Atkins 
21 Gary Lamar Cato, Jr. 
Aug. 25 Marian Carroll Swain 
Sept. 5 Ian Gregory Hawkes 
Sept. 11 Julia Hunter Fenton 
Sept. 20 Lauren Alexandria Romano 
Oct. 4 Austin Kenneth Heinrich 
Oct. 5 Tess Victoria Rice 
Oct. 26 Sydney Jessica Maki 
Dec. 8 Kristina Diane Wilson 
Dec. 8 Kerry Linnea Wilson 

179 



Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

May 

May 

June 18 

July 2 

July 5 

July 6 

July 13 

July 17 

July 18 

July 25 

Aug. 4 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



14 

18 

28 

9 

11 

22 

26 

27 

2 

6 

8 

8 

16 

1 

19 



Geoffrey & Brooke Hargreaves- 

Heald 
Timothy & Lisa Delaney 
Joel & Carolyn Bargmann 
Peter & Lindsay Blackler 
Prescott & Lucinda Burk 
John & Susan Terino 
Yale & Lori Bohn 
Mark & Regina Diarbakerly 
John & Irene Briedis 
Robert & Anne-Marie Ranee 
Daniel Elias & Karen Keane 
Alan Lee & Deborah Peebles 
James & Sandra Storer 
Stephen & Paula Johnson 
John & Elizabeth Tylko 
Frank & Vickie Panetta 
Bruce & Deborah Strock 
Robert & Terry Jacques 
Scott & Cynthia Green 
John & Lori Foley 
Michael & Linda Murray 
Mark & Susan Hollingsworth 
Gary & Wendy Hauser 
George Georges & Kim Cronin 
Raymond Johnson & Martha Vaananen 
Lewis & Deborah Smith 
Robert Waukhonen & Wendy Horwitz 
Edwin & Ann Robson 
John & Jamie Atkins 
Gary & Evelyn Cato 
Douglas & Rhonda Swain 
Gregory & Elaine Hawkes 
Terence & Cynthia Fenton 
Frank & Allison Romano 
Robert & Jane Heinrich 
John & Nathalie Rice 
Mark & Margaret Maki 
Robert & Jean Wilson 
Robert & Jean Wilson 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 

Jan. 13 



Names 



Residence 



Feb. 9 
Feb. 10 
Mar. 17 
Mar. 17 
May 5 
May 22 
May 29 
June 2 
June 9 
June 23 
June 30 
July 8 
July 14 
July 15 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 



Joseph Floyd Urner 
Lorian Rounsevell Brown 

David Boersner 
Jennifer Mary Finley 

George Edmund Foss, III 
Sara Crane Bonnet 

Wesley G. Brodsky 
Elizabeth Dexter Zaslove 

Robert Clement Pickett 
Martha Clare O'Neill 

Scott Robert Thompson 
Rebecca Susan Dorian 

Marc David Whitlow 
Reetta Raag 

John H. L. Bingham 
Katharine Munro Preston 

Paul L. Sylvia 
Elizabeth M. Russes 

Thomas Joseph Kinch 
Ruth Elizabeth McDougald 

Joris Naiman 

Lesya Alexandria Struz 

Christopher T. Yaroscak 
Elizabeth Anne Tracey 

Courtney Sanford Wang 
Jayne Ann Maxwell 

Benjamin J. Nisbet 
Remedios Z. Reyes 

Andrew Lawrence Stoll 
Carol Anne Locke 

John McNeil Angier 
Linda Susan Zamvil 

Michael A. Quadri 
Li da L. Armstrong 



Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Franconia NH 
Wellesley, MA 

Medford, MA 
Medford, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Newton, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Gaithersburg, MD 
Gaithersburg, MD 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Riverdale, NY 
Riverdale, NY 

Lincoln, MA 
Cambridge, MA 

Armonk, NY 
Lincoln, MA 

Dallas, TX 
Dallas, TX 

Lincoln, MA 
Astoria, NY 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Cambridge, MA 

Acton, MA 
Lincoln, MA 



180 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



Sept. 8 John Edward Schmidt 
Sheila Toby Vallance 

Sept. 16 Gregory M. Coppola 
Gail A. Mannarino 

Sept. 29 Mark Aurelius Bombara 
Rosamarie Polino 

Oct. 6 John B. Mitchell 

Lydia Elizabeth Barone 

Oct. 6 John David Mattison 

Marian Carol Clements 

Oct . 6 Ethan Eugene Rathbun 
Ann Genevieve Chute 

Oct. 7 Sean Robert Tunis 
Nancy Eliza Kass 

Oct. 12 Mark Cyril Spratt 

Nicola Clare Birchfield 

Oct. 13 Michael Joseph Lord 
Mary Elizabeth Roehr 

Oct. 13 Thomas Polk Moffat 

Diana Helen Wauhkonen 

Oct. 20 John Couch Vilas 
Jocelyn Elliott 

Nov. 17 George Roderick Hebard 
Cynthia Valles 

Nov. 24 David Thomas Loughlin 
Cynthia Ann Hughes 

Dec. 15 Anthony Randolph Nichols 
Mary Lou Sallee 



Lincoln, MA 
New City, NY 

Marlboro, MA 
Marlboro, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Somerville, MA 

Boston, MA 
Boston, MA 

N. Reading, MA 
N. Reading, MA 

Spring Lake Hgts., NJ 
Spring Lake Hgts, NJ 

Baltimore, MD 
Baltimore, MD 

Sudbury, MA 
Sudbury, MA 

St. Thomas, USVI 
St. Thomas, USVI 

Austin, TX 
Austin, TX 

Petersburg, VA 
Lincoln, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 

Hudson, MA 
Hudson, MA 

Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 



181 



Date 


of 


Death 


1989 




Dec. 


11 


1990 




Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


24 


Mar. 


9 


Mar. 


9 


Mar. 


10 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


24 


May 


3 


May 


9 


May 


20 


May 


21 


May 


23 


May 


26 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


31 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


8 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


18 


Aug. 


25 


Aug. 


25 


Aug. 


29 


Sept. 


5 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


21 


Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


21 


Nov. 


5 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


29 



DEATHS 



Name Years 



Eric C. Dessain 



Edward Harold Kass 72 

Catherine Mary Cahill 71 

Addison Cowles 85 

Marion G. Pantazelos 91 

Robert Eldridge White 73 

Alice Burnham 64 

Maria Antoinetta Pelosi 94 

Marion L. Ross 80 

Clement C. Sawtell 88 
Jeanette Elizabeth Bradley 71 

Wins low Martin 68 

Thomas Alfred Otto Gross 71 

Margaret Sykes 60 

An Wang 70 

Lucy Dodge Adams 32 

Leatrice June Welch 63 

Mary Linwood Norris 91 

Nicholas Aubrey Kent Mull 4 

Rose M. DelToro 71 

William Alexander Davis 73 

George P. Yore, Sr. 76 

Mary Bridget Gudzinowicz 67 

Stanford W. Scott 43 

Robert Bo it Burnham 72 

Bertha Loring Chapin 87 

Paul Loewenstein 69 

Henry Arnold Made an 82 

John Gersten 86 

David Michael Quinn 34 

Lot Bates Page 67 

Betty R. Wales 71 

Edward W. Smith, III 72 

Paul Vincent Moynihan 68 

Juliette Lydia Denis 74 

Amelia J. Aprille 75 

William Bernard Whalen 65 

Bertha H. Kessel 93 

John W. Carman 78 

Viginia B. Jevon 65 



182 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Virginia M. Niles 

Conrad H. Todd 

William B. Russell, Chairman 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1990, Treasury securities were 
purchased for the investment of principal and Income with varying 
maturities, mindful of the funding needs of each trust fund. 

Financial reports for each fund were completed in a timely manner 
under the guidance of the Treasurer's Office and with the able 
assistance of Cynthia Bouchard, Assistant Treasurer. This enabled 
the Commissioners to distribute the June 30, 1990 statements to the 
various administrators of the trust funds prior to the end of 1990. 

During the past year we accepted George C. Hibben's resignation 
as Commissioner after his election to the Office of Treasurer of the 
Town. While his departure was accepted with regret, his 
contributions during his tenure were deeply appreciated. The 
Commissioners were pleased to announce the appointment of Conrad H. 
Todd to fill his unexpired term. 

Following this report are individual statements of each trust 
fund for the year ended June 30, 1990. 



183 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Administered by three elected Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1939 $18, 763.50 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 3,896.59 

Securities Matured 1,000.00 

Transfer from John Todd - FY 89 4,527.60 

Transfer from John Todd - FY 90 4,722.15 

Interest applied to amortize 43.13 







$32,952.97 


Payments: 






Honoraria per order of Trustees 






Vartan Gregorian 


1,700.00 




George Archibald 


1,500.00 




Horace Clarence Boyer 


500.00 




David Hodgkins 


500.00 




Lecture Expenses 


797.93 




Printing and Postage 


887.99 




Purchase of Securities 


977.82 




Accrued Interest 


29.39 




Transaction Fee 


5.00 


6,898.63 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 $26,054.34 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 26,054.34 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 6/30/91 3,000.00 

$3,000 N.E. Power Co. 4.625% 11/01/91 3,000.00 

$3,000 Fed. Nafl Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 2,970.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.25% 3/15/92 3,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 2,958.75 

$4,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 4,000.00 

$3,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 4.00% 10/1/95 3,000.00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 2,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 977.82 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 2,965.31 

$2,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 1,947.50 

$55,873.72 

Accumulated Income 23,776.65 

Principal 32,097.07 

$55,873.72 






134 



A3BIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 



Payments 
None 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 



$1,109.29 

207.56 
$1,316.85 

0.00 
$1,316.85 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



JOHN TODD TRUST FUIW 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and 

the Berais Lecture Trustees 



1,316.85 

1,000.00 
$2,316.85 

1,091.80 

1,225.05 

$2,316.85 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 



Payments: 

Transfer to Bemis FY 89 
Transfer to Bemis FY 90 



4,527.60 
4,722.15 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 



$5,702.60 

4,722.15 
$10,424.75 



9,249.75 



$1,175.00 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$15,000 Fed. Farm Credit 15.20% 1/20/92 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 



1,175.00 

15,000.00 

13,825.00 

$30,000.00 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



0.00 

30,000.00 

$30,000.00 



185 



CB1ETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 



Administered by the Cemetery Commissioners 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Term Deposit Matured 
Interest Income 
Principal Payments 



Payments: 

Transfer to Town - 

per Town Meeting vote 
Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 



1,000.00 

19,850.00 

332.23 

90.64 



$5,989.37 

18,112.27 

3,584.32 

3,140.00 

$30,825.96 



21,272.87 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 



$9,553.09 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 11/15/93 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 3.625% 8/15/94 
$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/95 



9,553.09 
2,995.32 
10,071.90 
4,978.13 
9,778.10 
$37,376.54 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



16,124.27 
21,252.27 

$37,376.54 



186 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 



$2,575.85 
433.68 



Payments: 
None 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

West Newton Savings Bank 

Term Deposit 7.9% 10/05/90 

Accumulated Income 
Principal 

DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1939 
Receipts: 

Capital Gain 
Interest Income 
Securities Matured 

Payments: 

Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 



1,955.64 
59.78 
10.00 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 
$1,000 Fed. Nafl Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



0.00 



$3,014.53 



$3,014.53 

2,014.53 

1,000.00 

$3,014.53 



$2,720.74 

23.90 

788.58 

2,000.00 

$5,533.22 



2,025.42 



$3,507.80 



3,507.80 

1,000.00 

990.00 

986.25 

1,955.64 

$8,439.69 

3,207.37 

5,232.32 

$8,439.69 



187 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 

Payments: 
None 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

Accumulated Income 



$997.80 

80.14 
$1,077.94 

0.00 

$1,077.94 

$1,077.94 
$1,077.94 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Payments: 

Transfer to Scholarship FY 89 
Transfer to Scholarship FY 90 



288.55 
307.11 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



$397.73 

307.11 
$704.84 



595.67 



$109.17 



109.17 

3,000.00 

$3,109.17 

1,874.17 

1,235.00 

$3,109.17 



188 



JOSEPH BROOKS GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 $415.25 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 144.33 

Security Matured 1,000.00 

$1,559.58 

Payments: 

Transfer to Town FY 89 197.93 

Transfer to Town FY 90 136.91 

Purchase of Security 981.56 

Accrued Interest 4.00 
Transaction Fee 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 

Principal $1,217.27 

LAWRENCE H. GREEN FUND 



3.42 




1,323.87 
$235.71 


June 30, 


1990 


235.71 
981.56 



Administered by the President of the Lincoln PTA, the Chairman 
of the Lincoln Elementary School Committee and the Superintendent of 
the Lincoln Elementary Schools. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 $907.23 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 186.87 

Security Matured 1,000.00 







$2,094.15 


Payments: 






Brooks School - Book Award 


43.90 




Purchase of Security 


981.56 




Accrued Interest 


4.00 




Transaction Fee 


3.42 


1,032.88 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 $1,061.27 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1,061.27 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 981.56 

$2,042.83 

Accumulated Income 735.18 

Principal 1,307.65 

189 $2,042.83 



CHRISTINE PATTERSON FUND 



Administered by the Principal of the Brooks or Hartwell 
School, a staff member of the Brooks or Hartwell School, and a 
parent selected by the Board of Directors of the Lincoln PTA. 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 

Receipts: 

Interest applied to amortize 
Securities Matured 
Interest Income 



Payments: 
Arts Week 

Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost 



440.00 

9,815.65 

40.10 

34.20 



June 30, 1990 



$1,778.40 



21.56 

10,000.00 

1,026.58 

$12,826.54 



10,329.95 
$2,496.59 



MI1DT Composite Trust Fund 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 



2,496.59 

9,815.65 

1,000.00 

$13,312.24 

1,887.19 

11,425.05 

$13,312.24 



$988.73 

1,369.88 

$2,358.61 

$2,358.61 



Accumulated Income 



$2,358.61 



190 



DE CORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1939 

Receipts: 

Capital Gain 
Interest Income 
Securities Matured 
Interest applied to amortize 



Payments: 

Transfer to Town - FY 89 
Transfer to Town - FY 90 
Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost 



2,332.80 

2,330.71 

2,937.17 

12.83 

11.54 



June 30, 1990 



$4,634.50 



23.90 
2,355.08 
2,000.00 

43. 13 
$9,056.61 



7,725.05 
$1,331.56 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 

$4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 4/15/94 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 12.625% 5/15/95 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 

$2,000 Southern N.E. Telephone 5.75% 11/1/96 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 

$1,000 Commonwealth Edison 3.00% 8/1/01 

$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 8.625% 2/1/07 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 



Principal 



1,331.56 

3,000.00 

3,960.00 

2,000.00 

972.81 

2,014.36 

1,962.50 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

938.44 

973.75 

978.75 

2,925.00 

$25,107.17 

$25,107.17 



191 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FOND 



Administered by three Trustees, one each appointed by 
Selectmen, the Lincoln School Committee and the Town Moderator 



the 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest applied to amortize 
Interest Income 
General Appeal 
Securities Matured 
Transfer to Town FY 89 
Transfer to Town FY 90 



$15,178.16 

194.06 

10,754.97 

10,700.00 

9,946.83 

238.56 

307.11 

$47,359.74 



Payments: 

Grants per order of Trustees 
Printing and Postage 
Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 
Book Awards 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 

Cash and Securities at cost 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 11.75% 1/15/91 
$15,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 3/31/92 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 
$11,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 4/15/94 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 
$4,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 
$5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 
$6,000 So. N.E. Telephone 5.75% 11/1/95 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 
$5,000 Commonwealth Edison 3.00% 8/1/01 
320 Shares Exxon Corporation 
100 Shares NIPSCO Industries, Inc. 

Principal 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
Eleanor Tead Fund 
Ogden Codman Endowment Fund 

Accumulated Income 



11,750.00 
565.56 

10,770.31 
56.23 
33.29 
21.00 



23,202.44 



$24,167.30 
June 30, 1990 

24,167.30 
6,000.00 

14,981.25 
1,000.00 

10,181.83 
5,836.88 
1,007.19 

10,000.00 
9,956.24 
3,926.24 
4,937.50 
9,000.00 
6,000.00 
9,943.75 
4,853.75 
3,016.85 
2,973.63 
$127 847.46 



1,000.00 
1,770.00 
6,005.00 
1,120.00 
9,545.00 



19,540.00 

108,307.46 
$127 847.46 



192 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and managed by the 
Pierce Property Committee 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Use of Pierce House - Fees and Deposits 

Elsie Pierce Trust 

Interest applied to amortize 



Payments: 

Grants per order of the Selectmen 

COA - Podiatry Clinic 1,875.00 

60+ Health Clinic 1,500.00 
Pierce House Expenses 

Supplies and Furnishings 7,340.81 

Repairs and Maintenance 6,363.40 

Manager Compensation 10,632.00 

Gas for heating 3,426.82 

Other Utilities 3,183.45 

Mowing Pierce Park 3,541.38 

Capital Expenses 33,338.50 

Rubbish Removal 2,338.40 

Return of Deposits 13,260.00 

Purchase of Securities 1,007.19 

Accrued Interest 3.34 

Transaction Fee 4.06 



$101,765.15 

15,935.29 

44,290.00 

4,940.40 

21.53 

$166,952.40 



92,864.35 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 $74,083.05 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 

Unrestricted as to Principal and Income 

BayBank Middlesex 1,014.43 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 72,993.51 

$2,000 Fed. Nat'l Mtge. 7.05% 6/10/92 1,980.00 

7.25% 8/15/92 3,000.00 

10.875% 2/15/93 4,931.25 

9.00% 2/15/94 3,000.00 

8.875% 2/15/96 1,000.00 

8.50% 5/15/97 4,942.19 

8.75% 11/15/08 4,875.00 97,736.38 



$3,000 U.S. 


Treas. 


$5,000 U.S. 


Treas. 


$3,000 U.S. 


Treas. 


$1,000 U.S. 


Treas. 


$5,000 U.S. 


Treas. 


$5,000 U.S. 


Treas. 



193 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Restricted as to Principal 

MMDT - Cash 80.11 

$10,000 Fed. Nat'l Mtge. 7.05% 6/10/92 9,900.00 

$10,000 U.S. Treas. 7.25% 8/15/92 9,937.50 

$10,000 So. Cal. Ed. Co. 7.125% 1/15/94 10,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 8.625% 8/15/94 1,007.19 

$20,000 U.S. Treas. 9.50% 11/15/95 20,000.00 

$10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

$5,000 So. N.E. Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 5,000.00 

$10,000 Fla-. P & L Co. 6.00% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

$10,000 Pac. Gs & Ele. Co. 4.625% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

$10,000 Am. T & T Co. 4.75% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$10,000 Duke Power Co. 7.00% 2/1/99 10,000.00 

$10,000 S.W. Bell Tel. Co. 8.25% 3/1/14 9,503.50 $116,403.30 

$214 139.68 



Accumulated Income 97,736.38 

Principal 115,403.30 



$214,139 



194 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Administered by the Library Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1989 $26,353.94 

Receipts: 

Interest Income by Fund 

Codman Library Trust Fund 91.49 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth, 

& Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 207.24 
Alice Downing Hart & 

Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 126.89 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 23.15 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 73.73 

George Russell Library Fund 36.06 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 180.63 
George G. Tarbell Fund 360.93 

C. Edgar Wheeler & 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 104.79 

George C. Tarbell & 

Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
Lincoln Library Fund 
Katherine S. Bolt Fund 
John W. Carman & 

Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 
Herschbach Library Fund 
Virginia S. Dillman Fund 
Securities Matured 



934.91 
156.86 
166.18 




4,089.37 
209.17 
345.86 
466.29 


7,573.56 
16,000.00 
$49,927.50 



Payments: 






To Librarian from J.H. Pierce - 






Library Fund 


69.97 




Purchase of Books and Tapes 


2,442.00 




Purchase Piano 


1,000.00 




Purchase CD Rack 


348.90 




Tarbell Room Maintenance 


210.00 




Purchase Securities 


16,632.79 




Accrued Interest 


92.53 




Transaction Fees 


59.43 


20,855.62 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1990 $29,071 



195 



Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1990 
LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Accumulated 

Income Principal 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
Codman Library Trust Fund 
Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & 

Murray F. Farnsworth Fund 
Alice Downing Hart & 

Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 
John H. Pierce Library Fund 
George Russell Library Fund 
Abbie J. Steams Library Fund 
George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
C. Edgar Wheeler & 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
George G. Tarbell & 

Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
*Lincoln Library Fund 
^Catherine S. Bolt Fund 
John W. Carman & 

Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
Lucretia Jones Hoover Fund 
*Herschbach Library Fund 
Virginia S. Dillman Fund 



Total 



446.32 1,000.00 



1,770.31 1,000.00 



412.93 

73.73 

0.00 

234.67 

0.00 

413.92 

2,309.65 

1,428.96 
1,599.85 



1,000.00 

0.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

2,000.00 

0.00 

75.00 
0.00 
0.00 



9,912.35 331.57 

316.04 203.13 

(16.53) 2,935.64 

2.42 21.87 



$13,904.67 $10,167.21 



Securities Principal 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 1,000.00 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 1,000.00 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 6/30/91 1,000.00 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 1,000.00 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
$10,000 DuQuesne Light 7.00% 1/1/99 9,925.00 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

*Lincoln Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 1,000.00 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 9,000.00 
$12,000 U.S. Treasury 7.00% 4/15/94 11,673.75 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 6,000.00 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 2,944.68 

*Herschbach Library Fund 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 2,014.36 

Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 11/15/93 1,996.87 

Virginia S. Dillman Fund 
$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 -4,978.13 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 

* Un-restricted 



1,445.32 

2,770.31 

1,412.98 
73.73 

1,000.00 

734.67 

2,003.00 

413.92 

2,334.65 
1,428.95 
1,599.85 

10,293.92 

519.17 

2,969.11 

24.29 

$29,071.88 



55,532.79 
$84,604.67 

18,904.67 

65,700.00 

$84,604.67 



196 






VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Abbott, John & Diana 

Abbott, Margaret & Walter 

Abedian, Behrouz & Nasrin 

Abele, Bradford & Rosemary 

Abrams, George S, Tr 

Abrams, Nancy 

Abrashkin, Diana 

Ackley, Wallace & Ethel 

Adams Family Trust 

Adams, F. Douglas & Patricia 

Adams , Fred 

Adams, George & Velda 

Adams , John Quincy 

Adams, John/ Pat/ Peter/ Sharon 

Adams , Ramelle & Thomas 

Adarason, William & Barbara 

Adelstein, Mary & James 

Adkins, Robert & Alison 

Adler, Bruce 

Adler, Harold & Ivy 

Adler, Ivy Ruth 

Alam, Mahbub-ul & Momtaz 

Alam, Unme Salma Momtaz 

Alfieris, Michael 

Allen, Robert & Carol 

Allen, Rosamond 

Allen, Ruth 

Allen, Stephen 

Allison, Caroline 

Allison, Geoffrey & Lesley 

Allison, John & Marion 

Althausen, Alex & Emily 

Ames III, Adelbert & Mary 

Ames, James & Suzannah 

Araraen, David & Judith 

Araoruso, Renee 

Anderson, Carl 

Anderson, David & Elaine 

Anderson, Lawrence & Rosina 

Anderson, Mildred 

Andley, Kaushal & Usha 

Andrew, Francis & Dorothy 

Angell, Craig & Carolyn 

Appleyard, Norman & Lillian 

Aprille, Thomas & Amelia 

Apsler, Robert & Jacquelin 

Arcand, Eugene & Rita 

Arista, Miguel 

Armstrong, Charles, David, John & Lida 

Armstrong, Elayne 

Armstrong, John & Joanne 

197 



$ 425 


000 


256 


300 


343 


800 


556 


900 


1,438 


000 


265 


200 


211 


800 


1 


500 


86 


,500 


463, 


100 


187 


300 


456 


000 


54 


,300 


888, 


800 


1,213 


500 


422 


100 


206 


700 


315 


600 


176 


100 


683 


200 


23 


200 


641 


700 


212 


100 


235, 


900 


367 


900 


311 


700 


739 


500 


240 


000 


312 


,500 


415 


200 


230 


,200 


596 


300 


558 


900 


633 


000 


764 


,200 


222 


200 


379 


900 


287 


200 


451 


000 


295, 


600 


280 


200 


799 


000 


550 


100 


287 


300 


155 


800 


416 


500 


972 


100 


232 


400 


613 


,700 


262 


900 


802 


,200 



$ 4,653.00 
2,918.65 
3,768.05 
6,103.62 

16,308.43 

2,906.59 

2,321.33 

16.44 

948.04 

5,075.58 

2,052.81 

4,997.76 

595.13 

9,741.25 

13,299.97 
4,626.22 
2,265.43 
8,933.98 
1,930.06 
7,487.87 
254.27 
7,033.03 
2,324.62 
2,535.45 
4,032.13 
3,416.23 
8,104.92 
2,630.40 
3,425.00 
4,550.59 
3,070.99 
6,535.45 
6,125.54 
6,937.53 
8,375.63 
2,435.31 
4,163.70 
3,147.71 
4,942.95 
3,239.73 
3,070.99 
8,757.04 
6,029.10 
3,154.29 
1,707.57 
4,564.34 

10,654.22 
3,095.10 
6,725.15 
2,881.38 
8,792.11 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Arnold, Lisa 

Arnold, Warren & Barbara 
Aronson, Richard & Jane 
Arshad, Gulrez & Sara 
Art, Robert & Suzanne 
Arthur, J & -Young, Colin 
Asadorian, Alan & Melanie 
Asaff, Annis & Patricia 
Atchley Jr, Dana & Barbara 
Atchley, Barbara P. 
Atkins, John & Jamie 
Atlas, S. & Wilkerson , R. 
Austin, Richard & Marcia 
Avery, Abigail 
Avery, Albert & Barbara 
Ayer, Marilyn C. 
Azrack, Joseph & Abigail 



B H N Realty Trust 
Bachrach Jr, Alan 
Bacon, Anne 
Bagley, Patricia 
Baird, Gordon & Sarah 
Baldwin, Jacqueline 
Baldwin, Roger & Mary 
Balogh, Karoly & Judith 
Banks, Jamie & Mark 
Bannon, Michael 
Barbarow, Ruth 
Bardsley, Theodore & Doris 
Bare, Bruce & Helen 
Bargmann, Joel & Carolyn 
Barkas, Christopher & Mary 
Barmakian, Frank & Norma 
Barnaby, John & Charlotte 
Barnes, Benjamin 
Barnet, James 
Barrett, Beatrice 
Barry, Jon & Barbara 
Barth, Jeffrey & Mary 
Bartovics, William & Susan 
Basile Family Trust 
Basile, Patrick & Judith 
Basmajian, Vasken & Shohig 
Bassett, Kenneth 
Beal Jr. , Thomas & Barbara 
Beal, Bruce & Enid 
Beatty, Thomas & Sylvie 
Beenhower, Owen & Lillemor 
Behnke, James W. 



t 354,200 


$ 3,882.03 


473,300 


5,187.37 


616,000 


6,751.36 


723,300 


7,927.37 


279,100 


3,058.94 


673,300 


7,379.37 


386,300 


4,233.85 


470,000 


5,151.20 


585,400 


6,415.99 


176,100 


1,930.06 


295,500 


3,238.68 


422,800 


4,633.89 


521,900 


5,720.02 


420,400 


4,607.58 


179,600 


1,968.42 


235,900 


2,585.46 


1,108,800 


12,152.45 


1,500 


16.44 


496,000 


5,436.16 


269,000 


2,948.24 


760,700 


8,337.27 


683,600 


7,492.26 


236,700 


2,594.23 


441,000 


4,833.36 


523,300 


5,735.37 


362,500 


3,973.00 


105,700 


1,158.47 


123,400 


1,352.46 


258,200 


2,829.87 


429,200 


4,704.03 


579,600 


6,352.42 


274,700 


3,010.71 


532,800 


5,839.49 


261,100 


2,861.66 


462,500 


5,069.00 


529,900 


5,807.70 


597,000 


6,543.12 


543,100 


5,952.38 


1,249,400 


13,693.42 


375,800 


4,118.77 


508,300 


5,570.97 


391,500 


4,290.84 


387,400 


4,245.90 


375,200 


4,112.19 


794,900 


8,712.10 


701,200 


7,685.15 


462,500 


5,069.00 


434,200 


4,758.83 


397,500 


4,356.60 



198 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Booth, Alice 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Belanger, Michael & Gisa $ 204,900 $ 2,245.70 

Bell, Roger & Barbara W. 322,500 3,534.60 

Belle, Gene & Irene 405,700 4,446.47 

Bemis Ann 271,500 2,975.64 

Benedetti, Maryann 167,400 1,834.70 

Bennett, Doris 323,200 3,542.27 

Benson, John & Kathryn A. 303,500 3,326.36 

Benson, Peter & Ann 237,100 3,146.62 

Bentley Barbara 106,800 1,170.53 

Bentley, Joyce 496,300 5,439.45 

Bentley, Robert 249,000 2,729.04 

Benton, Stephen & Jeanne 359,500 3,940.12 

Berardino, R & Gustafson, K 130,800 1,433.57 

Bergen, Kenneth & Emily 821,700 9,005.33 

Bergen, Kenneth Dana Tr. 176,100 1,930.06 

Berger, Ralph & Carol 392,100 4,297.42 

Berman, Diane & Cohen, Donald 376,200 4,123.15 

Bernard, Clark & Susana 612,000 6,707.52 

Bibring, George & Marcia 230,700 3,076.47 

Bickford, Helen & Scott 562,500 6,156.00 

Bienfang, Don & Denise 393,300 4,310.57 

Bikales, Norman & Ann 833,300 9,132.97 

Billings, Bruce 135,600 1,486.18 

Billings, Despena & Thomas 412,400 4,519.90 

Billings, Sarah 116,000 1,271.36 

Birmingham, James & Carolyn 511,800 5,609.33 

Bishop, Robert & Sarah 419,700 4,599.91 

Bjork, Elizabeth 427,500 4,685.40 

Black, Stanley 183,600 2,012.26 

Black, Thomas 186,000 2,038.56 

Blackler, Peter & Lindsay 227,800 2,496.69 

Blanchard, Eileen 245,100 2,686.30 

Blatt, Thomas & Ann W. 311,500 3,414.04 

Blood, David & Iva Dane 258,200 2,829.87 

Bloom, Laurence & Elaine 322,000 3,529.12 

Bobbitt, Lake & Sarah 317,300 3,477.61 

Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 49,800 545.81 

Bockoven, Dorothy, Tr 326,000 3,572.96 

Bogner, Walter 456,200 4,999.95 

Bohn, Lori & Yale 221,300 2,425.45 

Bolt, Richard & Katherine 657,300 7,204.01 

Bolton, Warren & Doris 34,600 379.22 

Bombara, John & Maria 316,800 3,472.12 

Bond, Roger & Elizabeth 294,900 3,232.10 



47.300 518.41 



Booth, Robert 686,000 7,518.56 

Booth, Robert & William 33,800 370.45 

Boquist, Wallace 933,200 10,227.87 

Boruvka, John 100,400 1,100.38 

Boston Edison Co. 172,900 1,894.93 

Boston Higashi School 640,000 7,014.40 

199 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Boudris, Edward & Mary M. 
Bower, Joseph & Nancy 
Bowers, Spotswood 
Bowles, Clifford 
Boyce, Manley 
Boyce, Manley & Karen 
Boyer, John & Margaret 
Boyer, Markley & Julie 
Boyle, Donald & Judith 
Boynton, Daniel & Janet 
Braasch, John & Nancy 
Braden, John & Dianne 
Bradford, Muriel 
Bradlee III, Henry & Sandra 
Bradley, Clifford & Jeannette 
Brady, Robert & Martha S 
Brain, J. Walter & Patricia 
Brandt, John & Marilyn 
Brannen, Barbara 
Braude, Stephen 
Braun, Esther 
Bray, Thomas & Linda Micu 
3rennan, Michael & Dorothy 
Brennan, William & Eleanor 
Brenninkraeyer , Maximiliaan 
Briggs, David & Elaine 
Briggs, Randall & Mary 
Brisson, Evelyn & Norman 
Broadview Realty Trust 
Brobeck, William 
Broderick, Ronald & Elizabeth 
Brodney, Myra 
Brogna, Gerald & Mary 
Bronson, Franklin & Catherine 
Brooks, Paul 

Brooks, Rodney & Phanwadee 
Brower Tr., Howard 
Brown, Deaver 
Brown, Herbert & Theresa 
3rown, Jeffrey & Kathryn C 
Brown, Robert & Jeane 
Brown, Robert G & Donna 
Brown, Robert W & Lee 
Brown, Stephen & Susan 
Browne, Giles & Lorraine 
Brubaker, W.L. & Lorraine 
Brumme, Peter & Marie 
Bucci, Frank & Arlene 
Buchan, Barbara 
Bucholtz, Melvyn 
Buckler, Marilyn 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 548,700 


t 6,013.75 


633,600 


6,944.26 


297,200 


3,257.31 


433,200 


5,295.37 


208,800 


2,288.45 


396,800 


4,343.93 


429,400 


4,706.22 


807,800 


8,853.49 


229,900 


2,519.70 


243,700 


2,670.95 


617,000 


6,762.32 


593,600 


6,505.86 


266,000 


2,915.36 


559,200 


6,128.83 


211,700 


2,320.23 


322,200 


3,531.31 


217,300 


2,381.61 


490,400 


5,374.78 


637,800 


6,990.29 


687,100 


7,530.62 


471,400 


5,166.54 


360,200 


3,947.79 


262,500 


2,877.00 


298,400 


3,270.46 


558,900 


6,125.54 


508,700 


5,575.35 


434,600 


4,763.22 


357,200 


3,914.91 


230,800 


2,529.57 


236,000 


2,586.56 


3,600 


39.46 


556,800 


6,102.53 


701,000 


7,682.95 


325,200 


3,564.19 


550,400 


6,032.39 


376,700 


4,128.63 


681,900 


7,473.62 


673,900 


7,385.94 


398,000 


4,362.08 


670,300 


7,346.49 


281,600 


3,086.34 


262,300 


2,874.31 


221,200 


2,424.35 


599,000 


6,565.04 


471,600 


5,168.74 


303,300 


3,324.17 


562,100 


6,160.62 


443,500 


4,860.76 


304,600 


3,333.42 


435,500 


4,773.08 


410,400 


4,497.93 



200 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Buerger, Martin & Lila 
3uilders Collaborative 
Buonopane, Paul & Mary 
Burckett, Douglas 
Burk, Prescott & Lucinda 
Burke Jr, Walter, Tr 
Burke, Roger 

Burke, Thomas & Kathleen 
Burnes, Jeannette 
Burnham, Robert & Elaine 
Burt, William & Donna 
Butler, William & Nancy 
Buzney, Sheldon & Jane 
Bye, Willis & Angela 
Byrne, Brian & Julie 
Byrnes, Margaret 
Byron, Alan & Kathryn 



$ 561,400 
482,200 
326,100 
432,000 
186,500 
352,600 
565,000 
701,000 
314,200 
329,300 
456,000 
314,100 

1,074,900 
640,200 

1,103,200 
646,800 
240,600 



; 6,152.94 
5,234.91 
3,574.06 
4,734.72 
2,044.04 
3,864.50 
6,192.40 
7,632.96 
3,443.63 
3,609.13 
4,997.76 
3,442.54 

11,780.90 
7,016.59 

12,091.07 
7,088.93 
2,636.98 



CTT Associates 
Cabot, Mary D G 
Cadette, Antonta 
Caldwell, Sarah 
Calitri, Leon & Mary 
Campbell, Bruce & Deborah 
Campobasso, Richard & Lou Ann 
Campos -Garcia, German & Judith 
Cancian, David & Mary 
Cannon, Bradford & Ellen 
Cannon, Robert & Betty 
Cantlin, Antoinette 
Cantlin, John 
Cantu, Robert 
Capizzi, Catherine 
Capone, Albert &Mary 
Cappucci, Thomas & Barbara 
Caras, Byron & Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair & Florence 
Carl Jr, Charles 
Car ley, John & Joan 
Carlo, Peter & Cheryl 
Carman, John & Eleanor 
Carmen, William & Louise 
Carmody, Sean & Leie 
Carr, Frederick & Susan 
Carroll, Brenda/Hosey, John 
Carroll, Richard & Elaine 
Carter, John 
Carter, Lewis & Beverly 
Caruso, Robert & Abbie 
Carver, Jack & Donna 



274,100 
537,900 
188,300 
588,900 
267,000 
464,300 
313,300 
1,500 
512,000 
327,300 
838,600 
474,000 
605,700 
655,100 
853,400 
267,600 
369,100 
387,100 
292,700 
350,500 
450,800 
404.900 
690,800 
420,900 
260,200 
582,100 
209,000 
231,300 
682,600 
702,600 
279,500 
269,700 



3,004.13 
5,895.38 
2,063.77 
6,454.34 
2,926.32 
5,088.73 
3,433.77 
16.44 
5,611.52 
3,587.22 
9,191.06 
5,195.04 
6,638.47 
7,179.90 
9,353.26 
2,932.90 
4,045.34 
4,242.62 
3,207.99 
3,841.48 
4,940.77 
4,437.70 
7,571.17 
4,613.05 
2,851.79 
6,379.81 
2,290.64 
2,535.05 
7,481.30 
7,700.49 
3,063.32 
2,955.91 



201 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 





Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Caskey, Anna 


i 286,000 


t 3,134.56 


Caskey, Walter 


436,300 


5,329.85 


Cassidy, Brian P, Tr. 


193,100 


2,116.38 


Caswell, Frederick & Pamela 


491,200 


5,383.55 


Caswell, John & Carol 


509,600 


5,585.22 


Cavallaro, Peter & Elizabeth 


653,900 


7,165.74 


Cechony, Gerald 


245,400 


2,689.53 


Cellucci, Daniel & Yolanda 


397,900 


4,360.99 


Cellucci, Elizabeth & Stephen 


358,600 


3,930.25 


Chaet, Robert & Joyce 


242,800 


2,651.09 


Chaiken, Jan & Marcia 


394,100 


4,319.34 


Chalilpoyil, Purush & Kerstin 


300,600 


3,294.58 


Champeny , John 


- 145,700 


1,596.83 


Champeny, John/ Lisa 


361,400 


3,960.94 


Champeny, Leona 


751,400 


8,235.35 


Champion, Craig & Teresa 


622,100 


6,818.21 


Chan, Catherine 


384,100 


4,209.74 


Chan, Vincent & Agnes 


523,700 


5,739.75 


Chang, Chia Yung & Mei Lin 


168,100 


1,842.38 


Chapin, Bertha 


784,200 


8,594.83 


Chapin, Margaret 


318,100 


3,486.38 


Charles I Realty Trust 


3,500 


33.36 


Chase, Rebecca 


871,900 


9,556.02 


Chen, Sow-IIsin & Ching-Chih 


99,100 


1,086.14 


Cherniack, Jerome & Elizabeth 


306,900 


3,363.62 


Chin, Joseph & Barbara 


255,700 


2,802.47 


Chiotelis, Charles & Iasme 


447,400 


4,903.50 


Chipman, Mary 


259,700 


2,846.31 


Chisholra, Edward & Margaret 


289,900 


3,177.30 


Chmielinski, Tsun Ming & Robert 


233,700 


3,109.35 


Chopra, Deepak & Rita 


758,600 


3,314.26 


Chou, Harry & Lily 


498,500 


5,463.56 


Christensen, David & Patsy 


365,300 


4,003.69 


Christensen, Ronald 


478,400 


5,243.26 


Christopher, Thomas 


130,500 


1,430.28 


Chu, Chauncy & Margaret 


466,100 


5,108.46 


Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 


544,700 


5,969.91 


Chu, Irene 


378,500 


4,148.36 


Chu, Nelson & Tomoko 


449,300 


4,924.33 


Church, Robert & Priscilla 


501,400 


5,495.34 


Churchill, Richard & Maria 


1,307,600 


14,331.30 


Ciampa, V. /Sullivan, J. 


205,100 


2,247.90 


Ciampi, Mary 


330,400 


3,621.18 


Ciaramaglia, Frederick & Marcia 


476,200 


5,219.15 


Cibel, Stanley & Thelma 


284,000 


3,112.64 


CIraso, Anne, Jennie & John 


419,500 


4,597.72 


Clark, Clifford & Patricia 


487,400 


5,341.90 


Clark, Sandra B 


382,800 


4,195.49 


Clarke, James 


292,200 


3,202.51 


Coan, Thomas & Catherine 


235,600 


2,582.18 


Coane, Amolia 


195,700 


2,144.87 


2C 


2 


1 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Coffin, Stewart & Jane t 427,300 $ 4,683.21 

Cohen, Jacques 341,800 3,746.13 

Cole, Addison & Ann B 326,000 3,572.96 

Cole, Edwin & Lucy 457,200 5,010.91 

Cole, George & Barbara 528,100 5,787.98 

Coleman, George & Kathleen 426,000 4,668.96 

Coleman, Susan 1,500 16.44 

Collins, Donald & Susan 539,100 5,908.54 

Collins, Laurence & Janet 372,400 4,081.50 

Com jean, Marc & Judith 389,000 4,263.44 

Comjean, Marlies 585,000 6,411.60 

Como, Florence 297,200 3,257.31 

Comstock, Charles 240,000 2,630.40 

Corns tock, Joan 465,800 5,105.17 

Cone Jr, Thomas & Barbara 444,800 4,875.01 

Connolly, Joseph 367,600 4,023.90 

Conrad, Peter & Ylisabyth 435,500 4,773.08 

Constable, William 287,300 3,148.81 

Constantine, Katherine 307,300 3,368.01 

Cook, John & Caroline 420,500 4,608.68 

Cook, Jr, Paul & Marion 558,600 6,122.26 

Coolidge, Henry & Alice 661,800 7,253.33 

Coons, Nancy & Thomas, Peter 463,700 5,082.15 

Cooper, E Crawley & Jane 411,100 4,505.66 

Cooper, Lorna 479,200 5,252.03 

Copeland, Charles & Muriel 347,100 3,804.22 

Corcoran, Robert & Elizabeth 419,400 4,596.62 

Corio, Carol 188,300 2,063.77 

Cormack, Barbara 161,600 1,771.14 

Cotoia, Anthony & Lucy 725,200 7,948.20 

Cotoia, Lucy 433,600 4,752.26 

Cotoni, Arthur & Penelope 360,400 3,949.93 

Cotoni, Joseph 304,800 3,340.61 

Cotton, Diane 743,100 8,144.38 

Countryside Contemporaries 1,541,900 16,899.22 

Courtney, Joseph & Elaine 278,800 3,055.65 

Cousins, Estate of Lawrence 329,500 3,611.32 

Cowles, Addison & Alexandra 296,400 3,243.54 

Crafts Jr, Frederic 230,800 2,529.57 

Craig Jr, Stanley & Susan 560,400 6,141.98 

Crandall, Stephen & Patricia 547,400 5,999.50 

Crawford, Hugh 235,300 2,578.89 

Crawford, John & Joanna 486,300 5,329.85 

Creighton, Alexander & Elizabeth 308,300 3,378.97 

Cretella, Henry & Ruth 611,300 6,699.85 

Critch, William & Dorina L. 563,900 6,235.14 

Crockett, Katherine 1,200 13.15 

Crook, Constance 237,900 2,607.38 

Crosby, Douglas & Laura 606,500 6,647.24 

Crosby, Gregory & Anne 592,300 6,491.61 

Crowe, Mary 586,500 6,428.04 

203 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Culver, Perry 
Cummings, William & Palma 
Cunningham, J Lewis & Ruth 
Cunningham, James 
Cunningham, Robert & Margaret 
Cunningham, -Robert M & Claire 
Curtiss, Robert & Dorothy 



Dacosta, David & Dianna Gomas 

Dallos, Andras & Zsuzsanna 

Damico, Ralph & Elvira 

Damico Jr, Ralph & Edwina 

Damon, J Gilbert & Priscilla 

Damon , Nancy 

Dancona, liana 

Daniels, Bruce & Janet 

Daniels, Grover & Starr 

Danna, Mario 

Darling Jr, Eugene 

Darling, Leonard & Barbara 

Darraan, Richard 

Darrigo Brothers Co. 

Dautremont, Chester & Ruth 

Dautremont, Ruth 

Davis, R May 

Davis, Ronald & Barbara 

Davis, Sherman 

Davis, Sherman & Phyllis 

Dawes, Donald & Ruth 

De La Pena, Miguel & Irma 

DeNorraandie Farms Trust 

DeNormandie, Alice 

DeNorraandie, Eliana 

DeNormandie, Philip/Ernestine 

DeNormandie, Thomas, K & V 

Dean, Maybelle 

Dean, Robert & Denise 

Dean, William & Lorraine 

Debaryshe, Paul & Louise 

Decisneros, Maria 

Deck, Mark & Patricia 

Deguglielmo, Florence 

Dejesus, Paul & Eileen 

Delia, John & Maria 

DellaCamera-MacClary, Debra 

DelliPriscoli, Jon M. Tr. 

Delori, Francois & Rosamond 

Denehy, Bernadetta 

Denehy, Edward 

Denholm, Stuart & Jane 



829,700 


$ 9,093.51 


294,300 


3,225.53 


356,900 


3,911.62 


279,400 


3,062.22 


473,100 


5,185.18 


263,400 


2,886.86 


281,700 


3,087.43 


943,300 


10,338.57 


232,300 


3,099.49 


853,000 


9,403.69 


263,500 


2,887.95 


334,600 


3,667.22 


639,700 


7,011.11 


154,800 


1,696.61 


727,500 


7,973.40 


604,400 


6,624.22 


211,000 


2,312.55 


404,100 


4,423.94 


621,300 


6,809.45 


287,600 


3,152.10 


178,600 


1,957.45 


797,300 


8,733.41 


440,000 


4,822.40 


277,200 


3,038.11 


352,000 


3,857.92 


594,900 


6,520.11 


820,400 


8,991.59 


392,700 


4,303.99 


367,100 


4,023.42 


619,700 


6,791.91 


748,600 


8,204.66 


547,600 


6,001.70 


23,200 


254.27 


,241,400 


13,605.73 


5,900 


64.66 


232,400 


2,547.10 


325,400 


3,566.33 


315,200 


3,454.59 


302,900 


3,319.73 


545,200 


5,975.39 


1,500 


16.44 


443,500 


4,860.76 


444,300 


4,869.53 


622,300 


6,320.41 


183,700 


2,068.15 


643,500 


7,052.76 


591,700 


6,485.03 


392,200 


4,298.51 


581,500 


6,373.24 



204 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Denison, Mary $ 545,100 $ 5,974.30 

DesCognets, Gwendolyn 568,300 6,223.57 

Desai, Samir & Nilima 773,900 8,481.94 

Deterling Jr, Ralph & Mary 513,800 5,631.25 

Dewey, Edward & Zella 419,400 4,596.62 

Dewey, Edward S. & Laurie 855,500 9,376.28 

Dexter, Barbara 524,700 5,750.71 

Diab, Thomas 850,900 9,325.86 

Diadiuk, Vicky 325,600 3,568.58 

Diarbakerly, Mark & Regina 269,200 2,950.43 

Dickie, Richard & Julia 287,100 3,146.62 

Diebboll, Robert & Kim 252,500 2,767.40 

Dieterich, Richard & Beverly 404,600 4,434.42 

Digiovanni, Guy & Teresa 396,900 4,350.03 

Dilg, Giles 362,400 3,971.90 

Dillman, Douglas & Virginia 265,500 2,909.88 

Diners tein, Gordon 331,500 3,633.24 

Dixon, Milburn 130,300 1,428.09 

Dixon, Russell & Theresa 322,600 3,535.70 

Doherty, William & Phyllis 603,200 6,611.03 

Dohertys Garage Inc 563,600 6,177.06 

Do Ian,* Charles & Joanne 910,100 9,974.70 

Dolinsky, Larry & Joan 221,900 2,432.02 

Domenichella, Domenic 152,700 1,673.59 

Doraenichella, Frank & Margaret 278,100 3,047.98 

Domenichella Jr, Frank 62,500 635.00 

Donald, Aida 544,100 5,963.34 

Donald, David & Aida 257,600 2,823.30 

Donaldson, Alan 305,600 3,349.33 

Donaldson, Astrid 445,700 4,884.87 

Donaldson, David & Lynn 1,030,200 11,290.99 

Donaldson, Donald 1,300 14.25 

Donaldson, Elizabeth 458,300 5,022.97 

Donaldson, Jonathan & Nancy 709,400 7,775.02 

Donaldson, Magruder/ Jennifer 460,700 5,049.27 

Donaldson, Malcolm 849,900 9,314.90 

Donnell, Marion, Tr. 445,700 4,884.87 

Donovan, Andrew 512,300 5,614.81 

Donovan, Donna 331,700 3,635.43 

Dooley, Thomas & Helen 776,100 3,506.05 

Dorian, Paul & Susan 410,700 4,501.27 

Dougherty, Allen & Helen 228,800 2,507.65 

Doughty, Joseph 239,200 2,621.63 

Downey Jr, Edward /Elizabeth 296,400 3,248.54 

Downing, Daniel & Linda L 309,900 3,396.50 

Downs, Elaine 391,100 4,286.46 

Dowse, Amy 493,600 5,409.86 

Drago, Nicholas & Sara 462,900 5,073.38 

Drane, Douglas 892,600 9,782.90 

Drew, Frederic & Shirley 209,900 2,300.50 

Driscoll, Daniel & Constance 547,500 6,000.60 

205 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Duane, Nell & Flore tta $ 363,400 $ 3,982.87 

Dubin, Steven & Merrie L 419,800 4,601.01 

Dubois, Olive 254,400 2,788.22 

Duborg, George 437,800 4,798.29 

Duffy III, James & Barbara 813,200 8,912.67 

Dunlap, Arthur 169,000 1,852.24 

Dupont, Emile 834,000 9,140.64 

Durso, Nicholas 255,100 2,795.90 

Dustin, Rachel 332,100 3,639.82 

Dyer-Alexander, Cheryl 651,100 7,136.06 



Eaton, Jefferson 265,400 2,908.78 

Eckhardt, Homer 358,300 3,926.97 

Eckhardt, William & Carolyn 328,400 3,599.26 

Edes, Francis & Martha 303,600 3,327.46 

Edlund, Campbell 340,100 3,727.50 

Egendorf, Andrew & Linda 472,500 5,178.60 

Elias, Daniel & Karen K 337,000 3,693.52 

Elkus, Howard & Lorna 484,200 5,306.83 

Elliott, Peggy 607,500 6,658.20 

Ellis, Eloise 629,100 6,894.94 

Ellis Jr, Alexander & Nancy 829,300 9,089.13 

Ellison, George & Clare 804,200 8,814.03 

Ells, Stephen 167,800 1,839.09 

Elwood, David & Carol 290,600 3,184.98 

Emerson, William 452,500 4,959.40 

Emery, Alice 401,600 4,401.54 

Emmons, Judith 502,200 5,504.11 

England, Albert & Priscilla 612,100 6,708.61 

Eppling, Frederic & Sarah 297,700 3,262.79 

Epstein, Arnold & Patricia 517,300 5,669.61 

Ericson, Herbert & Erlyne 392,400 4,300.70 

Eschenroeder, Alan & Laura 538,500 5,901.96 

Eshleman, Dean 220,800 2,419.97 

Etcheverry, Nicholas 547,600 6,001.70 

Evangelista, Florenzo & Dorothy 235,000 2,575.60 

Evans, Lucius & Cynthia 860,500 9,431.08 



Faddoul, George & Natalie 307,000 3,364.72 

Fairbanks, Alan & Diane 1,500 16.44 

Falender, Andrew 417,200 4,572.51 

Faneuil Hall Flower Mkt. 447,900 4,908.99 

Faran, James 538,700 5,904.15 

Fargo, Susan & Foster 550,200 6,030.19 

Farny, Michael 440,200 4,824.59 

Farny, Michael & Ethel 306,500 3,359.24 

Farrell, Philip & Ruth 355,600 3,897.38 

Farrokh-Pars, Homayoon 282,100 3,091.82 

Fehr, David & Karen M. 545,500 5,978.68 

206 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Feinberg, Neil $ 358,300 $ 4,036.57 

Feldinan, Deborah 387,000 4,241.52 

Felegian, Peter & Marion 349,700 3,832.71 

Felix, Janes 313,600 3,491.86 

Fenijn, Chris & Yvonne 347,800 3,811.89 

Fenton, Terence & Cynthia 210,500 2,307.08 

Fernald Jr, George & Eleanor 747,800 8,195.89 

Ferri, Edward & Eleanor 354,000 3,879.84 

Ferro, Armand & Jacqueline 282,000 3,090.72 

Fico, Robert & Catherine 296,600 3,250.74 

Finnegan, Lawrence 134,000 2,016.64 

Finnerty, James & Anna 297,000 3,255.12 

Finnerty, Richard & Wendy 467,500 5,123.80 

Finney, Ross & Laura 980,200 10,743.00 

Finucane, Ann 644,000 7,058.24 

First Atlantic Properties 879,900 9,643.71 

Fiscale, Joseph & Rosanna 369,300 4,047.53 

Fisher, John 414,200 4,539.63 

Fitts (Todd), Gertrude 609,700 6,632.31 

Fitzgerald, Derek & Eleanor 315,700 3,460.07 

Fitzgerald, John & Thelma 337,700 3,701.19 

Fitzgerald, Michael/Kathleen 1,237,200 13,559.71 

Flannery, Constance 468,200 5,131.47 

Flannery, Donald Jr & Mittie 244,500 2,679.72 

Flansburgh, Earl & Louise 516,800 5,664.13 

Fletcher, Norman 263,300 2,835.77 

Flint Realty Trust 215,400 2,360.78 

Flint, Edward & Henry 337,300 3,696.81 

Flint, Ephraim 15,100 165.50 

Flint, Eugenia 308,300 3,378.97 

Flint, George & Lucie 309,900 3,396.50 

Flint, Jonathan & Alice 437,600 4,796.10 

Flint, Margaret S. 366,500 4,016.84 

Flint, Peter & Janet 311,600 3,415.14 

Flint, Warren & Margaret S 3,100 33.93 

Flint Jr., Warren & Margaret 540,600 5,924.98 

Flummerfelt, J Kent & Jane 697,300 7,542.41 

Flynn, William & Therese 348,800 3,822.85 

Fogg, Stephen, Tr 317,700 3,481.99 

Foley, John 283,100 3,102.73 

Forbes, John 176,100 1,930.06 

Ford II, David & Mary 700,700 7,679.67 

Fortunato, Frank & Joan 229,900 2,519.70 

Foster, Gerald & Candace 375,000 4,110.00 

Foster, J Edward & Sara 410,200 4,495.79 

Francis, Henry & Phoebe 331,100 3,628.86 

Frank, Robert & Velma 637,800 6,990.29 

Frankston, Michael & Meredith 459,800 5,039.41 

Fraser, Donald & Joanne 531,100 5,820.85 

Fraser, Robert & Donna 300,900 3,297.86 

Frazier, Michael & Janet 218,000 2,389.28 

207 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Gervais, Maurice 
Gheith, Dorothy 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Freed, Charles & Florence $ 460,100 $ 5,042.70 

French, John & Deborah 666,000 7,299.36 

Freud, Sophie 473,400 5,188.46 

Friedman E. & Cohen J. 982,200 10,764.91 

Frost, Rainer & Martha 412,000 4,515.52 

Frost, Wesley & October 299,600 3,283.62 

Fulford, Marion 164,500 1,802.92 

Funaro, Enrico & Catherin 591,500 6,482.84 

Fusillo, Concetta 555,500 6,088.29 



Gable, Bruce & Dawn 338,500 3,709.96 

Gabovitch, Annette 349,700 3,832.71 

Gailey, Timothy & Mary 373,700 4,095.75 

Gannett, Ann 705,100 7,727.90 

Gardent Jr, Paul & Harriet 289,100 3,168.54 

Gargill, Lynn 283,500 3,107.15 

Gargill, Robert 1,139,100 12,484.54 

Garmory, Bertha 225,100 2,467.10 

Garner, Robert & Kathleen 278,600 3,053.46 

Garrison, David & Alice 381,300 4,179.05 

Garrison, John 547,000 5,995.12 

Garside, Alice 255,800 2,803.57 

Garth, John & Nancy 312,100 3,420.62 

Gary, Maida 339,200 3,717.63 

Gatchell Jr, G Gordon & Esther 284,300 3,115.93 

Gauvin, Gregory & Mary 355,300 3,894.09 

Gavrin, Edward 465,400 5,100.78 

Gechijian, Ara & Nancy 5,400 59.18 

Gcchter, Jerry & Anne 180,700 1,980.47 

Geer, Charles 902,300 9,839.21 

Gentile, Joseph & Kathleen 242,800 2,661.09 

Georges, George & Kim C. 349,600 3,831.62 

Gerson, Nathaniel & Sareen 383,400 4,202.06 

Gertz, Dwight & Virginia 413,300 4,529.77 



& Francoise 278,000 3,046.83 

256,000 2,805.76 

, William & Erica 508,100 5,568.78 

Giese, Paul & Lucretia 367,600 4,028.90 

Gilfoy, Donald & Helen 353,900 3,873.74 

Gillis, John & Marsha 551,500 6,044.44 

Gimbel, Katherine 281,100 3,080.85 

Giurleo, James & Mary 34,000 372.64 

Glanz, Marcy 627,800 6,880.69 

Glass, John & Florence 336,900 3,692.42 

Glendon, Richard & Diana 264,600 2,900.02 

Goddard, Richard & Karen 236,300 2,589.85 

Goldbaum, Michael & Wanda 420,200 4,605.39 

Golden, Sylvia 410,700 4,501.27 

Goldlust, Jerry 242,200 2,654.51 

Goldstein, Joel 229,900 2,519.70 

208 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Goodrich, John & Susan $ 478,500 $ 5,244.36 

Goodspeed, Jacqueline 307,800 3,373.49 

Goodwin, Susan M. 105,700 1,153.47 

Gordon, Allen & Gilman, Terri 293,100 3,212.38 

Gordon, Doris 686,600 7,525.14 

Gordon, Lester & Dafna 424,700 4,654.71 

Grabill, Martha 292,300 3,203.61 

Graddis, Richard 8,200 89.87 

Graf, Jeannette 252,800 2,770.69 

Graham, Cynthia 119,900 1,314.10 

Graham, Jack & Norma 586,800 6,431.33 

Gras, Ranulf & Annette 391,200 4,237.55 

Grason, Edna - 373,000 4,088.08 

Gray, George & Ellen 542,200 5,942.51 

Gray, Leslie & Jessie 492,600 5,398.90 

Gray, Patricia & Stephen 661,100 7,245.66 

Greaves, Allan & Theresa 286,700 3,142.23 

Greco, C. & Young, K. 590,800 6,475.17 

Greeley, James & Bernice 371,800 4,074.93 

Green, Jerry & Pamela 640,500 7,019.88 

Green, Laurence & Margot 344,700 3,777.91 

Green, Myra - 750,800 8,228.77 

Green, Robert T. & Catherine 659,300 7,225.93 

Green, Robert V. & Therese 430,100 4,713.90 

Greenberg, Sandra 344,700 3,777.91 

Greenberger, Joel & Catherine 729,300 7,993.13 

Greeson, Joseph & Jennie 690,200 7,564.59 

Greetham, Douglas & Noreen 352,400 3,862.30 

Grieman, Eric & Brenda 105,700 1,153.47 

Griggs, Annette & Thomas 438,300 5,351.77 

Grim Jr., William & Barbara 305,900 3,352.66 

Grindlay, Jonathan & Sandra 755,300 8,273.09 

Grinnell, Virginia 375,800 4,118.77 

Grinnen, Lewis 673,700 7,383.75 

Gross, Thomas & Judith 368,200 4,035.47 

Grover C. Stuart & Gunilda 338,300 4,255.77 

Groves, Allan & Camille 349,300 3,828.33 

Guarino, Guy & Frances 598,400 6,558.46 

Gudzinowicz, Mary & John 303,500 3,326.36 

Guldberg, Peter & Alexandra 720,000 7,391.20 

Gummere, John 493,900 5,413.14 

Gundy, William & Malora 699,500 7,666.52 

Gustafson, J Kenneth & Janet 313,600 3,437.06 

Gustavson, Glenn & Patricia M 438,900 5,358.34 

Guthke, Karl & Dagraar 411,100 4,505.65 

Guy, Cynthia 499,400 5,473.42 

Gyftopoulos, Elias & Artemis 831,400 9,112.14 



H. B. Knowles, Inc. 731,700 8,019.43 

Haartz, Beatrice 470,800 5,159.97 

209 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Haber, Stuart & Ellen 

Hachikian, Kenneth & Gloria 

Hadley, Henry & Janna 

Hadlock, Charles St Joanne 

Haessler, Diane 

Haggerty, John & Mary Jo 

Haggerty, Nancy 

Hagmann, Otto & {Catherine 

Hales, Charles & Mary Ann 

Hall III, Andrew 

Halpern, Nicholas & Betsey 

Hamilton, William H & Esther 

Hamilton, William L & Barbara 

Hammond III, John & Nancy 

Hanania, Barbara 

Hanlon, R.obert & Mary 

Hansen, C Russel & Pamela 

Hansen, Kent 

Hanson, Adler & Madeline 

Hapgood Jr, Norman & Ruth 

Harding, Douglas & Susan 

Harding, Sheila 

Hargreaves-Heald, Geoffrey & Brooke 

Haroian, Henry & Jessie 

Haroutunian, Harry & Anita 

Harrington, Nancy (Ms Forg) 

Harrington, Winthrop 

Harrington, Winthrop & Andrea 

Harrington Jr., Clifford 

Harris, Eric 

Harris, Melvyn & Nancy 

Harris, Roger & Evelyn 

Harrison, E. & Phillips, D. 

Harrison, Henry & Elizabeth 

Harvey, Frank & Adele 

Hatsopoulos, George & Daphne 

Hatsopoulos, John & Patricia 

Hawes, Donald & Lillian 

Hawkes, Gregory & Elaine 

Hay, Pamela & Richard 

Haydock, Gale/Freeman, Mason 

Hayes, Oliver & Paula 

Hayes, Wilson & Dana 

Hays, Timothy & Pamela 

Healey Jr, Harry & Jeanne 

Healthcare Property Investor 

Healy, Edward & Helen 

Heart, Frank & Jane 

Hecht, Norman & Mary 

Heck, Stanley & Mary 

Heckscher, Charles & Lavinia 



$ 487,900 


$ 5,347.38 


575,500 


6,307.48 


519,900 


5,698.10 


509,600 


5,585.22 


525,000 


5,754.00 


498,800 


5,466.85 


247,400 


2,711.50 


506,600 


5,552.34 


576,700 


6,320.63 


541,300 


5,932.65 


464,000 


5,085.44 


411,200 


4,506.75 


360,900 


3,955.45 


603,400 


6,613.27 


229,700 


2,517.51 


230,700 


3,076.47 


531,800 


5,828.53 


723,600 


7,930.66 


371,000 


4,066.16 


500,400 


5,484.38 


375,800 


4,118.77 


172,200 


1,887.31 


529,300 


5,801.13 


332,000 


3,638.72 


184,500 


2,022.12 


16,200 


177.55 


1,038,200 


11,926.67 


29,700 


325.51 


51,700 


566.63 


457,600 


5,015.30 


495,800 


5,433.97 


277,600 


3,042.50 


428,600 


4,697.46 


988,800 


10,837.25 


611,100 


6,697.65 


928,100 


10,171.98 


353,300 


9,352.17 


391,100 


4,286.46 


668,000 


7,321.28 


496,200 


5,438.35 


493,000 


5,403.28 


295,500 


3,233.68 


458,800 


5,028.45 


395,100 


4,330.30 


402,700 


4,413.59 


1,500 


16.44 


370,500 


4,060.68 


390,900 


4,234.26 


425,900 


4,667.86 


1,117,200 


12,244.50 


353,900 


3,878.74 



210 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Heghinian, Aram Tr. $ 340,300 $ 3,729.69 

Heijn Jr, Cornelius & Marion 284,000 3,112.64 

Heinrich, Paul 355,200 3,892.99 

Helllrauth, Joseph & Regina 376,600 4,127.54 

Henderson, Robert 115,400 1,264.79 

Henderson, Robert & Carolyn 343,300 3,762.57 

Henderson, Ronald & Priscilla 353,400 3,873.25 

Hendrickson, Robert & Ruth 265,000 2,904.40 

Hensley, Kevin & Melissa 221,300 2,425.45 

Herlacher, Larry & Jane 613,700 6,726.15 

Herlin, Melvin & Eugenia 446,900 4,898.02 

Herman, Peter & Mary 234,100 2,565.74 

Herrmann, Carl 120,900 1,325.06 

Herron, Robert & Dinny 508,800 5,576.45 

Hersch, Charles & Phyllis 359,800 3,943.41 

Herschbach, Dudley & Georgene 403,200 4,419.07 

Herthel, Evelyn 574,600 6,297.62 

Hester, Leon 513,600 5,629.05 

Hewitt, Elizabeth & George 443,800 4,864.05 

Hibben, George 587,400 6,437.90 

Hickok, Jonathan & Debra 346,100 3,793.25 

Hicks, Robert & Sarah " 207,500 2,274.20 

Hieronyraus, William & Raraelle 531,900 5,829.62 

Hill, Craig & Heather 543,200 6,008.27 

Hill, John, Tr 176,100 1,930.06 

Hinds, Edward & Edith 737,500 8,083.00 

Hingston, Joseph & Gloria 263,300 2,885.77 

Hoar, Norman & Shirley 362,700 3,975.19 

Hoben, Allan & Susan 334,700 3,668.31 

Hoch, Alfred 234,800 2,573.41 

Hoch, Reimar 242,100 2,653.42 

Hodgson, Nicholas & Melissa 811,700 8,896.23 

Hoff, Charles & Josephine 643,400 7,051.66 

Hoffman, Steven & Jeanine 310,000 3,397.60 

Hogan, James & Mary Jane 113,000 1,238.48 

Holberton, Philip & Anne 557,200 6,106.91 

Holbrook, George & Sarah 116,100 1,272.46 

Holden, Sarah 994,200 10,896.43 

Holden, Sarah & Lawrence 215,400 2,360.78 

Holland, Peter & Marjorie 316,100 3,464.46 

Holland, Taffy 482,400 5,287.10 

Hollingsworth, Florence 544,100 5,953.34 

Hollister, Walter & Sally 387,700 4,249.19 

Hoover, Henry 429,300 4,705.13 

Hopengarten, Fredric & Betty 366,700 4,019.03 

Hopkins, Mark & Margaret Y. 443,800 4,864.05 

Hopkins, Robert & Mary 386,600 4,237.14 

Hopland, Jan & Barbara 723,800 7,932.85 

Home, Benjamin & Jean 519,500 5,693.72 

Horwitz, Murray & Patricia 446,300 4,891.45 

Houghton, Lillian 139,300 1,526.73 

211 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Houtzell, Stephanie $ 301,000 $ 3,298.96 

Hoversten, Barbara 355,900 3,900.66 

Howard, Joseph & Sally 500,800 5,488.77 

Hsiao, Chia-Chuan & Hwa-Ying 326,900 3,532.82 

Hsu, Cheng-Pei & Maggie 269,300 2,951.53 

Hsu, Michael & Dora 626,700 6,853.63 

Huang, Tai-San & Fu-Mei 407,600 4,467.30 

Hubbard, Eliot 573,000 6,280.08 

Hull, Kenneth & Sandra W. 318,500 3,490.76 

Humez, Alice D 935,100 10,248.70 

Hunsaker Land Corp. Inc 28,500 312.36 

Hunsaker, Alice 377,000 4,131.92 

Hunsaker, Jerome 834,700 9,148.31 

Hunt, Daniel & Joan 982,800 10,771.49 

Hunter, David & Trucksis, M. 188,300 2,063.77 

Hunter, William & Suzanne 353,500 3,929.16 

Hunter, William, Tr. 702,300 7,597.21 

Hurd, Kenneth 587,900 6,443.38 

Hurff, Joseph & Elizabeth 359,100 3,935.74 

Hyman, William & Aida F. 326,800 3,581.73 



Ide, Kenton & Christel 327,100 3,585.02 

Iliescu, Nicholas & Esther 396,100 4,341.26 

Immel, Stephen & Peggy 412,800 4,524.29 

Ingard, Sven 455,100 4,987.90 

Inglis, John & Elizabeth 569,200 6,238.43 

Ireland, David & Diana 619,600 6,790.82 

Irwin, Mary 603,300 6,612.17 

Ives, Katherine C. 614,000 6,729.44 

Ivy Realty Trust 1,221,200 13,384.36 



Jackson Jr, Gardner & Sallie 354,100 3,990.54 

Jackson, Huson & Polly 616,200 6,753.55 

Jacobs, David & Louise 485,600 5,322.18 

Jacobs, Richard & Ilene 878,500 9,628.35 

Jacquet, Ernest & Madeline 645,100 7,070.30 

James, Hamilton & Waleska 653,100 7,157.97 

Janes, G. Sargent & Ann 371,200 4,068.35 

Jarvis, John & Elaine 532,900 5,840.58 

Jenal, Robert & Irene 586,400 6,426.94 

Jerodel Realty Trust 1,171,700 12,841.83 

Jevon, Robert & Virginia 386,700 4,238.23 

Jewett, Eleanor 567,900 6,224.18 

Jewett, Julie D 522,800 5,729.89 

Joannopoulos, John & Sandra 617,300 6,765.61 

John, DeWitt & Morley 598,300 6,557.37 

Johnson, Ernest 298,400 3,270.47 

Johnson, Ernest & Grace 447,300 4,902.41 

Johnson, H.W. & Jeannine 589,800 6,464.21 

212 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Johnson, Kenneth & Gladys $ 394,600 $ 4,324.82 

Johnson, Kimmond & Anne 788,900 8,646.34 

Johnson, Richard A.& Donna 927,300 10,163.20 

Johnson, Rollin & Hilary 344,600 3,776.82 

Johnson, Stephen & Paula 697,700 7,646.79 

Johnston, Carolyn 312,000 3,419.52 

Joshua's Way Realty Trust 873,700 9,575.75 

Juliano, Paul 117,900 1,292.13 



Kahn, Martin & Susan 508,300 5,570.97 

Kalaidjian, W G & Wray, E. 355,300 3,894.09 

Kalajian, Michael & Seta 506,200 5,547.95 

Kalaos, Spyros & Lisa Mendes 167,400 1,834.70 

Kalba, Konrad & Patricia 421,900 4,624.02 

Kameny, Stuart & Wendy 495,600 5,431.78 

Kanarek, Stephen & Roberta 328,400 3,599.26 

Kano, Cyrus & Dorothy 347,500 3,803.60 

Kao, Peter & Mei-Lin 595,600 6,527.78 

Kasperian, Karl & Carol 665,400 7,292.78 

Kass, Edward & Araalie 977,700 10,715.59 

Kassner, Michael 353,800 3,877.65 

Katz, Saul & Dorothy 349,800 3,833.81 

Kaufman, Marcia(Josephson) 421,900 4,624.02 

Kaye, Harold & Alice 310,000 3,397.60 

Keay, Donald & Mary Ann 391,600 4,291.94 

Keevil, Charles & Hannah 459,600 5,037.22 

Keiley, Philip & Evelyn 130,800 1,433.57 

Kelleher, Robert & Katherine 438,800 4,809.25 

Keller, John & Lanna 196,400 2,152.54 

Keiley, Andrew & Irene 352,600 3,864.50 

Kellner-Lundberg, Joan 248,600 2,724.66 

Kendrick, Marvin & Kathleen 1,500 16.44 

Kennedy Land Corp. 51,900 568.83 

Kennedy, Albert & Carolyn 355,300 3,894.09 

Kennedy, Albert E. 18,000 197.28 

Kennedy, John P & Sylvia 512,900 5,621.38 

Kennedy, John T. 562,500 6,165.00 

Kern, Edward & Priscilla 449,800 4,929.81 

Kerrebrock, Jack & Bernice 480,400 5,255.18 

Kessel, Joseph & Lesley 355,300 3,894.09 

Ketteringhaai, John & Susan 468,000 5,129.28 

Keyes, Janet 301,800 3,307.73 

Kiley, Christopher 159,700 1,859.91 

Kilgore, Benjamin & Leslie 293,300 3,269.37 

Kimball, Joan & John 423,000 4,636.08 

Kiranach, Elizabeth 291,700 3,197.03 

King, Eleanor 370,800 4,063.97 

King, Pay-Shin & Tong-I 340,200 3,728.59 

King, William & Elizabeth 318,100 3,485.33 

Kingsbury, Howard & Ellen 307,700 3,372.39 

213 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Kreidler, Anne 




Kroin, 


Lawrence 


Kubik, 


Janes & 


Elizabeth 


Kuhns , 


Roger & 


Roberta 


Kuhns- 


Diraanescu, Katherine 


Kulka , 


J Peter 




Kumar , 


Suparna 




Kumler 


, Kipton 


& Katherine 


Kurtz, 


Arthur 




Kurzina, Peter 


& Stephanie 


Kusik, 


Charles 


& Wendy Palu 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Kirkpatrick, Margaret $ 442,600 $ 4,850.90 

Kistiakowsky, Irraa 552,600 6,055.50 

Kitses, Steven & Mary 446,200 4,890.35 

Kjellander, Mary 355,600 3,897.33 

Klem, Christopher & Susan 392,200 4,298.51 

Klera, Walter & Mary 359,300 3,937.93 

Kling, John & Louise 286,200 3,136.75 

Klobuchar, John & N Maribeth 313,900 3,440.34 

Knowlton, Anne 588,500 6,449.96 

Knox, Wendell & Lucile 460,200 5,043.79 

Ko, Nai Nan & Julia 822,600 9,015.70 

Koallick, Stephen & Elsa 221,300 2,425.45 

Koehler, Edward & Margaret 323,800 3,548.85 

Kolbin, Lawrence & Rebecca 403,300 4,420.17 

Kolligian, Zoe 710,600 7,788.18 

Konstandakis, Nicholas & Mary 329,600 3,612.42 

Korhonen, Miriam 289,900 3,177.30 

Kornfeld, George & Hulen 270,700 2,966.87 

Koumantzelis, Arthur & Vaia 595,700 6,528.87 

Koupas, William & Jeanne 616,800 6,760.13 

233,400 3,106.06 

230,800 2,529.57 

400,700 4,391.67 

438,200 4,802.67 

557,200 6,106.91 

596,400 6,536.54 

228,400 2,503.26 

459,100 5,031.74 

706,700 7,745.43 

396,200 4,342.35 

335,400 3,675.98 

344,100 3,771.34 

Kwasniak, Walter 255,800 2,803.57 



Lachica, Victor & Lois 119,900 1,314.10 

Lackner-Graybiel, James & Ann 474,500 5,200.52 

Ladjevardi, Habib & Golnaz 902,700 9,893.60 

Lahnstein, Richard 220,900 2,421.06 

Landry, Christopher & Barrie 805,900 8,832.66 

Lane, J Frank & Kathleen 578,200 6,337.07 

Lang, Richard & Betty 497,700 5,454.79 

Langton, William & Jane 531,800 5,828.53 

Lankhorst, Beverly 320,800 3,515.97 

Lathrop, Scott & Beatrice H. 442,900 4,854.18 

Lawrence, Adele 295,800 3,241.97 

Lawson, John 128,400 1,407.27 

Lay, Kenneth & Virginia 544,800 5,971.01 

Lazaridis, Lazarus & Suzanne 417,700 4,577.99 

Leach, Priscilla & Moskalenko 119,900 1,314.10 

Leaning, J. & Barron, R. 474,800 5,203.81 

214 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Leape, Martha 

Lechtenberg, Edward 

Lee, Alan & Deborah Peebles 

Lee, David 

Lee, John & Bo Yeon 

Lee, Kenneth u Marcia 

Lee, Richard & Josephine Gump 

Lee, Shih Ying & Lena 

Lee, Thomas & Barbara 

Lee, Woolc & Helen 

Legates, John 

Leger, Mary, Tr. 

Leggat, Barbara 

Lemander, William & Emily 

Lemire, Robert & Virginia 

Lenick, Barry 

Lenington, Robert & Carolyn 

Lennon, Janes & Kathy Rushby 

Lennon, Stephen & Grace 

Leong, Joseph & Suzanna Szeto 

Lerman, Elizabeth 

Leslie, Paul & Elizabeth 

Levey Jr, Harold & Ruth 

Levi, Thomas & Joyce King 

Levin, Alvin & Betty 

Levy, Morris & Wendy 

Levy, Raymond & Nonny 

Lewis, William 

Li, Mingche & June 

Li, Yao T & Nancy 

Liepins, Atis & Diana 

Liepmann, W.H. & Cynthia 

Light Jr, Galen & Lois 

Lin, Augustine & Susan 

Lincoln Automotive 

Lincoln Homes Corp. 

Lincoln House Assoc 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corp 

Lincoln, Robert & Mary G 

Linnell, Geraldine 

Linstron, Peter & Maybelle 

Lippman, Anne u/w Richard 

Lipsey, Steven & Michaela 

Litte, Rudolph 

Little, John & Elizabeth 

Little, William & Susan 

Livermore Jr, Robert & Isabel 

Lo, Chien-Pen & Lucy 

Lo, Steven & Yi-Chao 

Locashio, Philip & Constance 

Lockwood Jr, Dunbar & Irene 



$ 447,100 
485,700 
449,700 
224,100 
365,600 
464,600 
634,500 
550,500 
535,000 
115,100 
609,400 
209,800 
606,700 
391,700 
387,600 
100,900 
415,700 
238,800 
360,000 
252,300 
474,400 
171,500 
307,300 
340,100 
430,100 
365,700 
382,200 
221,900 
617,100 
558,700 
439,700 
396,600 
293,100 
276,100 
515,800 
8,270,000 
1,258,000 
143,000 
527,400 
399,400 
247,900 
282,000 
711,300 
370,700 
405,400 
309,100 
530,800 
238,300 
291,300 
581,400 
628,700 



fc 4,900.22 
5,323.27 
4,928.71 
2,456.14 
4,006.98 
5,092.02 
6,954.12 
6,033.43 
5,863.60 
1,272.46 
6,679.02 
2,299.41 
6,649.43 
4,293.03 
4,248.10 
1,105.86 
4,556.07 
3,155.25 
3,945.60 
2,874.81 
5,199.42 
1,879.64 
3,368.01 
3,727.50 
4,713.90 
4,008.07 
4,188.91 
2,432.02 
6,763.42 
6,123.35 
4,819.11 
4,346.74 
3,212.38 
3,026.06 
5,653.17 
90,639.20 
13,787.68 
1,567.23 
5,780.30 
4,377.43 
2,716.98 
3,090.72 
7,795.85 
4,062.87 
4,443.18 
3,387.74 
5,817.57 
2,611.77 
3,192.65 
6,372.14 
6,890.55 



215 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Loewenstein, Davida 

Long, Cathryn 

Loud, Robert & Gwyneth 

Love ring, Talbot & Emily 

Low, Stephen .& Barbara 

Lozen, Stephen & Kristin 

Ludden, John & Susan 

Luft, Anne Dore 

Luijben, Monique 

Lupo, Robert 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand & Ingeborg 

Lutnicki, Harriet 

Lutnicki, Victor & Harriet 

Lyons, Richard 

Lytle Jr, William 



$ 422,300 
551,400 
268,700 
346,600 
482,600 

1,167,900 
376,200 
379,400 
345,100 
269,700 
437,100 
60,200 
639,500 
271,800 
429,600 



; 4,628.41 
6,043.34 
2,944.95 
3,798.74 
5,289.29 

12,800.18 
4,123.15 
4,158.22 
3,782.30 
2,955.91 
4,790.62 
659.79 
7,008.92 
2,973.93 
4,708.42 



MacKenzie 
MacKinnon 
MacLaurin 



MacMahon 
MacMahon 
MacNeil, 



Ma, Kee Maggie 
Maclnnis, Hazel 
MacKenzie, Ethel 
MacKenzie, Murdock & Adeline 
Paula & Vellante, 
John & Kristine 
Ellen 

MacLean, H Arnold & Corinne 
MacMahon, Darcy & Kathryn 

H Edward & Marian 
Lucia T. 
Bruce 

MacNeil, John & Madge 
MacNeil, R.onald & Wendy 
MacRae, S. & Broadbent, E. 
Mahan, Russell & Anastasia 
Mahoney, Anne 
Mahoney, John & Eleanor 
Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 
Maillet, Joseph & Busa, Franl 
Maki, Mark & Margaret 
Mallows, Minette, Tr. 
Malloy, David 
Malloy, Robert & David 
Maloney Jr, Bernard & Janet 
Mannarino, Joseph & Florence 
Manning, Catherine 
Mansfield, James & 
Mansfield, R. , M., 
Manuel, John 

Manzelli, Donald & Janet 
Manzelli, John & Dorothy 
Maranian, Arthur & Helen 
Marcks, Ronald & Barbara 



Wra 



Sarah 
F., & 



J. 



106,400 
239,200 
494,200 
352,200 
130,800 
116,100 
509,500 
382,600 
20,500 
289,300 
273,000 
437,500 
931,100 
253,200 
323,600 
450,800 
246,800 
419,300 
506,000 
654,400 
100,200 
241,600 
175,900 
101,700 
436,300 
206,400 
247,700 
362,500 
536,800 
101,800 
748,100 
255,100 
574,200 
449,600 



1,166.14 
2,621.63 
5,416.43 
3,860.11 
1,433.57 
1,272.46 
5,584.12 
4,193.30 
224.68 
3,170.73 
2,992.08 
4,795.00 
10,752.86 
2,775.07 
3,546.66 
4,940.77 
2,704.93 
4,595.53 
5,545.76 
7,172.22 
1,098.19 
2,647.94 
1,927.86 
1,114.63 
4,731.85 
2,262.14 
2,714.79 
3,973.00 
5,883.33 
1,115.73 
8,199.18 
2,795.90 
6,293.23 
4,927.62 



216 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Marcus, Fred & Patricia 
Marcuvitz, Andrew & Eileen 
Marier, Bruce & Suzanne 
Maroni, Kevin & Jaman 
Marple, Gary & Meredith R 
Marsden, Peter & Mary 
Marsh, Paul & Margaret 
Marstall, Jerry & Nancy 
Martin, Robert & Margaret 
Martin, Winslow & Anne 
Martinez, Norberto 
Martini, William & Virginia 
Mascari, Rita & Luciano 
Mason, Elizabeth & Max 
Mason, Virginia 
Massachusetts Centers, Inc. 
Massachusetts Port Authority 
Masters, Joseph 
Mattes, Sara & Ritz, Jerome 
Maurer, David 

Maxwell, Patricia & Walker, Wm, 
May Jr, James & Linda 
May, Doris 

Mayfield, Glover & Gale 
McAleavey, Cynthia 
McAleer, Harold & Shirley 
McCann, Sylvia & John 
McCart, Robert & Rose, Trs 
McCart, Robt & Olivo, Nicholas 
McCarthy, Paul & Wladyslawa 
McCarthy, Stephen & Phoebe 
McColl, Archibald & Delight 
McConchie, James & Linda 
McCune, William & Elizabeth 
McCurrach, John & Marjorie 
McDermott, Thomas & Gloria 
McDougald, Ronald & Kathleen 
McGovern, John & Anna 
McHale, Kevin 
McHugh, James & Katherine 
Mclnnes, Richard & Barbara 
Mclnnis, Donald & Joan 
McKay, Mary-Ellen 
McKelvy, Douglas 
McKenna, John & Coline W 
McKenney, James & Janis 
McKenney, Sandra L. 
McKnight, David 
McKnight, David & Eleanor 
McKnight, Ernest Ex. 
McLaughlin, James 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 437,200 


* 4,791.71 


805,600 


8,829.38 


431,300 


4,727.05 


910,300 


9,976.89 


492,100 


5,393.42 


292,800 


3,209.09 


667,600 


7,316.90 


399,400 


4,377.42 


283,300 


3,159.77 


255,600 


2,801.33 


254,200 


2,786.03 


402,000 


4,405.92 


497,200 


'5,449.31 


300,600 


3,294.53 


457,900 


5,018.58 


3,385,800 


37,103.37 


1,399,800 


15,341.81 


566,500 


6,208.84 


408,200 


4,473.87 


235,900 


2,535.46 


358,200 


3,925.87 


881,800 


'9,664.53 


281,600 


3,086.34 


435,000 


4,757.60 


100,400 


1,100.38 


538,600 


5,903.06 


458,100 


5,020.78 


552,100 


6,051.01 


1,042,300 


11,423.61 


603,200 


6,611.07 


605,800 


6,639.57 


274,300 


3,006.33 


536,000 


5,874.56 


2,060,900 


22,587.46 


751,100 


8,232.06 


1,147,800 


12,579.89 


615,900 


6,750.27 


402,700 


4,413.59 


1,062,700 


11,647.19 


481,800 


5,230.53 


630,800 


7,461.57 


347,100 


3,804.22 


435,600 


4,774.13 


336,300 


3,635.85 


234,200 


2,566.83 


498,400 


5,462.46 


340,800 


3,735.17 


121,200 


1,323.35 


241,600 


2,647.94 


264,100 


2,894.54 


20,000 


219.20 



217 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



McLaughlin, Robert & Roberta $ 295,100 $ 3,234.30 

McMorrow, Maureen & Richard 670,700 7,350.87 

McSweeney, Eugene & Barbara 196,600 2,154.74 

Mead, Varnum & Janice 402,800 4,414.69 

Meade, Edmund & Eleanor 440,900 4,832.26 

Mecsas, Michael & Mary 434,000 4,756.64 

Meeks, M Littleton & Louise 440,100 4,823.50 

Meenan, Marion 447,500 4,904.60 

Melanson, Leonard & Mary 208,400 2,284.06 

Meriam, Ellin 316,500 3,463.84 

Merrill, Vincent & Anne 310,900 3,407.45 

Merullo, Anthony & Donna 326,700 3,530.63 

Messina, Elena 569,500 6,241.72 

Meyer, Eugene & Melissa 1,022,000 11,201.12 

Michener, Susanah 212,700 2,331.19 

Middleton, Neil & Susan A 524,500 5,748.52 

Mikropoulos, Harilaos Tr. 543,900 5,961.14 

Milender, Sumner & Edith 543,200 5,953.47 

Millard Jr, Donald & Catherine 676,700 7,416.63 

Millard, Donald & Jeannette 764,900 8,383.30 

Millard, Susan & David 790,800 8,667.17 

Miller, David & Karen 231,500 2,537.24 

Miller, Harold & Marcheta 547,900 6,004.98 

Miller, Keith & Janet 578,600 6,341.46 

Miller, Peter 377,400 4,136.30 

Miller, Stephen & Natalie 478,900 5,248.74 

Minnick, Martha 263,600 2,889.06 

Mintz, Norbett * Carol 465,400 5,100.78 

Minuteman Tech Voc. H.S. 557,000 6,104.72 

Mitchell, W Randle & Kay 426,600 4,675.54 

Mix, Thomas & Flannery, S & S 422,000 4,625.12 

Mixon, Scott 368,000 4,033.28 

Moeller, Robert 773,300 8,475.37 

Mohr, John & Jean 855,900 9,330.66 

Moldave, Peter M 159,300 1,745.93 

Moller, Cynthia 252,600 2,738.50 

Montgomery, Maurice & Florence 304,800 3,340.61 

Moor, Edgar & Joan 661,100 7,245.66 

Moore, Dorothy 287,300 3,148.81 

Moore, Murvale & Negarre 407,900 4,470.53 

Moran, David & Mary B. 423,600 4,642.66 

Morey, Kenneth & Ruth 226,600 2,483.54 

Morgan III, Robert & Marcia 548,400 6,010.46 

Morgan, Edward & Terri 251,100 2,752.06 

Morgan, Henry & Gwen 563,800 6,179.25 

Morganti, Victor & Helga 540,200 5,920.59 

Morris, Beatrice 165,500 1,813.88 

Morris, Lloyd & Katherine 286,300 3,137.85 

Morrissey, J Neil & Mary 266,400 2,919.74 

Morse, Thomas 540,500 5,923.88 

Morse, William & Patricia 685,500 7,513.08 

218 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Morss Jr, Charles $ 355,600 $ 3,897.38 

Morton, Peter 317,600 3,480.90 

Mosch, Karl & Joan 674,800 7,395.81 

Moses, Meredyth & John 533,700 5,849.35 

Mosher D & C & Schliemann P & D 124,800 1,367.81 

Mosher, David & Claire 867,500 9,507.79 

Mosher/Schliemann, Trs. 58,600 642.26 

Moss, Elizabeth 733,200 8,035.87 

Moss, Karen 314,600 3,448.02 

Moss, Leonard & Frances 348,400 3,818.46 

Moss, Philip & Jane 444,600 4,372.82 

Moss, Sidney 19,500 213.72 

Moss, Sidney & Silke 446,500 4,893.64 

Mount, Wayne & Claire 397,500 4,356.60 

Mozzi, Robert & Ruth 431,700 4,731.43 

Mrakovich, David & Gertrude 335,700 4,227.27 

Mrugala, Anthony 287,000 3,145.52 

Mudge, Jeffrey 268,200 2,939.47 

Mueller, Robert & Jane 611,700 6,704.23 

Mulcahy, Douglas & Beverly F 239,000 2,619.44 

Mundt, Kevin & Jayne 793,300 8,694.57 

Munroe Jr, William & Mary 425,200 4,660.19 

Murphy Jr, William & Louise 1,500 16.44 

Murphy, Bartholomew & Sara S 299,400 3,231.42 

Murphy, Ruth 486,000 5,326.56 

Mutschler, Louis & Phyllis 425,000 4,658.00 

Myers, Lucy 303,500 3,326.36 

Mygatt, Samuel & Susan H 475,300 5,209.29 

Myles, Theresa & J Richard • 440,500 4,827.88 



Nabih, Ismail 525,300 5,757.29 

Nadolski, Thomas & Rosemary 458,200 5,021.87 

Nagy, John 375,100 4,111.10 

Naiman, Mark & Adeline 301,200 3,301.15 

Najarian, K George & Carolann 685,100 7,503.70 

Najjar, Edward & Gail 1,062,200 11,641.71 

Napier, S. & Fitts, Chas Jr 242,900 2,662.18 

Nardi, Edward & Jean 371,300 4,069.45 

Nardone, Nancy 573,600 6,341.46 

Narod, Joel 262,000 2,871.52 

Nawoichik, Elsie 565,300 6,195.59 

Neiley, Alexander & Diana 440,000 4,822.40 

Nelson Street Realty Co. 2,106,200 23,083.97 

Nelson, Albert, Marjorie & Robert 306,500 3,359.24 

Nenneman, Richard & Katherine 508,300 5,570.97 

Neri, John & Ingrid 233,000 2,553.68 

Nessen, E. Richard 495,900 5,435.06 

Nesto, Bruno 21,500 235.54 

Neumann, Ernest & Sylvia 394,400 9,802.63 

Newbold & Maxwell 184,700 2,024.31 

219 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Newbold, Thomas & Noreen $ 240,000 $ 2,630.40 

Newburger, Babette 394,100 4,319.34 

Newcombe, Charles & Lawrence 418,000 4,581.28 

Newcombe, Lawrence 195,200 2,139.39 

Newell, Lena 273,800 3,000.85 

Newman, Robert & Mary S 1,423,700 15,603.75 

Newton Jr, George & Suzanne 446,500 4,893.64 

Nicholson, Kathryn 601,500 6,592.44 

Nickerson, Bruce 257,500 2,822.20 

Nickerson, Elizabeth P 556,600 6,100.34 

Nicolaides, Paris Tr. 856,100 9,382.85 

Nielson, David & Linda 381,800 4,184.53 

Niles, Robert & Virginia 372,900 4,086.98 

Nisbet, Ian & Shirley 350,900 3,845.86 

Nockles, William & Diane 394,600 4,324.82 

Nopakun, Suvitya & Apilaj 523,100 5,733.18 

Norris, Mary 286,500 3,140.04 

Noss, George & Millicent 236,000 2,536.56 

Notkin, Leonard & Ann 353,900 3,878.74 

Nunes, Geoffrey & Clare 634,500 7,502.12 



O'Brien, Daniel & Mary 362,300 3,970.80 

O'Brien, John 139,100 1,524.54 

O'Brien, Joseph & Virginia 333,100 3,650.78 

O'Connor, Daniel 223,300 2,502.17 

O'Connor, John 492,900 5,402.13 

O'Loughlin, John & Joanne 404,200 4,430.03 

O'Neil, David 410,500 4,499.08 

O'Neill, Philip & Lisa A. 631,900 6,925.62 

O'Rourke, Paul & Marilyn 1,015,500 11,129.83 

Oak, Ingul & Setsuko 427,000 4,679.92 

Ogden, David 557,300 6,108.01 

Ohl, Robert & Irina 123,800 1,356.85 

Okin, Robert & Susan 825,100 9,043.10 

Old Bedford Road Realty Trust 7,160,800 78,432.36 

Old, Bruce & Katharine 266,600 2,921.94 

Olivieri, Janes & Dorothy 160,700 1,761.27 

Olsen, Kenneth & Elva-Liisa 832,000 9,118.72 

Olshansky, Kenneth & Hope G 375,900 4,119.86 

Ong, Robin & Hsiao-Mei 677,400 7,424.30 

Onigman, Marc & Maureen 258,100 2,933.38 

Order of Saint Anne 193,000 2,115.28 

Orzell, Frank & Ann R. 419,600 4,593.82 

Osborne, Gordon 979,300 10,733.12 

Outten, Henry & Nancy 345,100 3,732.30 

Owen R Calvin & Ellen 323,700 3,547.75 

Owen, C & MacAloney, P. 317,500 3,479.80 

Owen, Donald 349,500 3,830.52 

I 

220 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Paboojian-Hagopian, Helen $ 325,300 $ 3,565.29 

Pacheco, Luis & Donna M. 433,000 5,293.68 

Paddock, Ann & Kelley, Penny 123,800 1,356.85 

Paddock, Janes & Ilga 565,800 6,201.17 

Page, Lot & Patricia 476,000 5,216.96 

Page, Stanley & Elisabeth 256,700 2,813.43 

Page Jr, Walter & Susan 589,300 6,458.73 

Paglierani, Lawrence & Pamela 358,400 3,923.06 

Paik, Sungik & Wanda 560,900 6,147.45 

Palmer, Attelio & Kathryne 283,400 3,106.06 

Pampel, Roland & Carol 624,100 6,840.14 

Panetta, Frank & James 24,900 272.90 

Panetta, Frank, Tr. 226,500 2,482.44 

Panetta Jr, Fran-c, Tr. 321,400 3,522.54 

Panetta, James & Rosemary 208,600 2,286.26 

Panetta, Rita 200,300 2,195.29 

Panetta, Theresa, Tr. 303,500 3,326.36 

Pantazelos, Peter & Hytho 876,200 9,603.15 

Pareek, Purna 529,000 5,797.84 

Parke IV, Nathan & Ann 528,500 5,792.36 

Parker, Jackson & Jacqueline 400,300 4,387.29 

Parla, John 222,600 2,439.70 

Parsons, David & Mary 411,300 4,507.85 

Pasieka, John 229,900 2,519.70 

Pastoriza, James & Ruth 563,400 6,174.86 

Patalano, Vincent & Sandra 1,164,800 12,765.21 

Payne, H Morse & Helen 236,700 2,594.23 

Payne, Roger 456,900 5,007.62 

Payne, William & Mary 615,500 6,745.88 

Pearlman, Robert 234,200 3,114.83 

Pearmain, W Robert & Claire 604,700 6,627.51 

Peavy Jr, Leopold & Elizabeth 771,300 8,453.45 

Peloquin, Roy 228,500 2,504.36 

Perch, Alvin & Geraldine 603,600 6,615.46 

Perera Jr, Guido & Joan 697,800 7,647.89 

Perkins, Simon & Marianne 119,900 1,314.10 

Perlman, Samuel & Marjorie 957,100 10,489.82 

Perlrautter, Steven & Terry 575,900 6,311.86 

Perrault, Norman, Guy, Patricia 238,600 2,615.06 

Perry, A.W. & Judith 442,500 4,849.80 

Perry, John C & Sarah 445,600 4,883.78 

Perry, John R & Marilyn 259,300 2,841.93 

Perry, Richard & Nancy 514,300 5,636.73 

Peterson, Mary 640,500 7,01^.88 

Pettigrew, Valerie & Brian 678,700 7,438.55 

Phalon, Susan 167,000 1,830.32 

Phelps, Robert & Elizabeth 416,000 4,559.36 

Phelps-Braun, Diane 555,400 6,087.18 

Phillipps, Patrick & Janice 548,400 6,010.46 

Phillips, Charlotte 750,000 8,220.00 

Phinney, Jean 254,900 2,793.70 

221 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 

Tax 



Pho, Johnny & Ada $ 444,400 

Pianka, Walter & Ann 427,400 

Picardi, Brigitte & Attanasio, Frank 295,200 

Piccinini, Helen 280,600 

Picker, Dennis & Jenifer B. 372,800 

Pickett, Robert & Andrew 482,400 

Pickman, Anthony & Alice 1,285,100 

Pierce, James 337,800 

Pierson, Marie & Mark 301,700 

Pike, John & Mary 639,900 

Pikl, Barbara 444,600 

Pingeon, James 228,900 

Pino, Frank 259,200 

Pinto, Robert & Clare 495,100 

Pippen, Wesley 194,000 

Pitkin, Bonny 100,200 

Plouffe, Francis & Gerene 344,400 

Plukas John & Anne 796,100 

Polino, Rosa/Bombara, Mark 119,900 

Ponn, Richard & Nancy 958,500 

Postel, Sholem 313,000 

Potter, Ruth & DiLuzio, Rudolph 436,200 

Poulos, Charles 220,100 

Poulos, Charles & Sophie 374,900 

Powers Jr, Francis & Helen 231,200 

Powers, Martin & Diana 256,200 

Preston, Katharine 373,800 

Preston, William M 747,700 

Privitera, Salvatore & Doris 640,700 

Protopapa, Sejfi 540,800 

Pruitt, Stephen & Denise 247,100 

Prussing, Carl & Karen 10,900 

Puffer Jr, Richard & Margaret 458,100 

Pugh III, Alexander & Julia 419,800 



; 4,870.62 
4,684.30 
3,235.39 
3,075.33 
4,085.89 
5,237.10 

14,084.70 
3,702.29 
3,306.63 
7,013.30 
4,872.82 
2,508.74 
2,840.83 
5,426.30 
2,126.24 
1,098.19 
3,774.62 
8,725.25 
1,314.10 

10,505.16 
3,430.48 
4,780.75 
2,412.30 
4,103.90 
2,533.95 
2,807.95 
4,096.85 
8,194.79 
7,022.07 
5,927.17 
2,703.22 
119.46 
5,020.73 
4,601.01 



Quarton, Gardner & Frances 
Quayle, Dwight & Deborah 
Quelch, John & Joyce 



354,800 

516,300 

1,029,800 



3,888.61 

5,658.65 

11,286.61 



Raag, Valvo & Kaija 
Rabinowitz , Sarauel/Stanislawa 
Ragan, Ralph & Ruth 
Raggio, Gabriel & Alexandra 
Raghavan ,Lakshrainarasimhan 
Raja, Roy & Ellen 
Rando, Thomas J 
Rappaport, Jerome & Phyllis 
Rapperport, Eugene & Lucy 
Rappoli, Arthur & Dorothy 



761,000 
408,300 
306,500 
225,100 
611,300 
368,900 
495,400 
880,000 
349,600 
328,000 



8,340.56 
4,474.97 
3,359.24 
2,467.10 
6,699.85 
4,043.14 
5,429.53 
9,644.80 
3,831.62 
3,594.88 



222 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Rasco, Austin & Suzanne 

Rawson, Edward & Nancy 

Ray, Kenneth & Marjorie 

Ray, Ruth V. 

Rayner, Evelyn H. 

Redden, Hugh & Linda 

Redmond, Rosemary 

Reece, Richard & Susan 

Reed, Patricia R. 

Reid, Cynthia 

Reid, Watson 

Reidel, Arthur H 

Reider, W James & Ruth 

Reiman, Peter & Patricia 

Reinherz, Bernard & Barbara 

Reinherz, Ellis L 

Reiser, George 

Relraan, Arnold & Harriet 

Repko, Bruce 

Resnick, Charles & Marie 

Revis, Kenneth & Judith 

Ricci, Russell & Carla 

Rice, Clifton & Margaret 

Rice, David B. 

Rice, James & Barbara 

Rice, John & Nathalie 

Rice, Paul G 

Rich, Janet 

Richards, Ruth 

Richardson, Frederick & Inge 

Ries, David & Sutherland, Ann 

Riker, Evelyn 

Risch, Martin 

Risley, Curtis & Jean 

Risser, Thomas & Tranquilina 

Ritsher, Cynthia W. 

Ritsher, John 

Rizzo, Jane L. 

Robbat, Joseph & Dana 

Robbins, Deborah A. 

Robbins, Roland & Geraldine 

Robinson, John & Ragnhild 

Robinson, Lessie 

Robson, Edwin & Ann 

Rodman, Laura 

Roehr, Marcia 

Rogers, Alfred & Louise 

Rogers, Chris & Cathy 

Rogers, Diana, Tr. 

Rogers, Harriet J 

Rogers, Joseph H 



$ 510 
385 
326 
444 
253 
276 
422 
465 
302 
236 
527 
277 
424 
299 
803 
397 
826 
540 
189 
532 
527 
512 
508 
367 
285 
229 
448 
199 
346 
370 
399 
235 
307 
402 

1,030 
252 
376 
493 

1,010 
257 
253 
505 

1,699 
130 
809 
765 
416 
263 
967 
352 
445 



,200 
,300 
,700 
,300 
,500 
,200 
,300 
,800 
,000 
,300 
,100 
,200 
,400 
,200 
,200 
,000 
,300 
,500 
,300 
,400 
,300 
,400 
,700 
,700 
,500 
,000 
,900 
,700 
,100 
,100 
,600 
,300 
,400 
,000 
,100 
,800 
,300 
,900 
,800 
,300 
,400 
,600 
,400 
,800 
,000 
,500 
,000 
,100 
,600 
,900 
,700 



i 5 

4 
3 
4 
2 
3 
4 
5 
3 
2 
5 
3 
4 
3 
8 
4 
9 
5 
2 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
3 
2 
4 
2 
3 
4 
4 
2 
3 
4 

11 
2 
4 
5 

11 
2 
2 
5 

18 
1 
8 
8 
4 
2 

10 
3 
4 



591.79 
233.85 
580.63 
,869.53 
778.35 
027.15 
628.41 
105.17 
309.92 
589.85 
777.02 
038.11 
651.42 
279.23 
,803.07 
351.12 
056.25 
923.88 
074.73 
,835.10 
779.21 
615.90 
575.35 
029.99 
129.08 
509.84 
919.94 
188.71 
793.25 
055.30 
379.62 
539.85 
369.10 
405.92 
239.90 
.830.29 
124.25 
413.14 
078.37 
820.01 
777.25 
541.38 
625.42 
433.57 
866.64 
389.88 
559.36 
883.58 
604.90 
867.73 
884,87 



223 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie $ 391,900 

Rollins, Janes 444,700 

Rood, Jane, Tr. 226,600 

Rose, James & Glenys 321,600 

Rose, Stuart & Margie 488,600 

Rosen, Edward & Esther 255,800 

Rosen, Paul & Annette 271,400 

Rosenberg, Carl & Judith 606,500 

Rosenberry, Dale & Mary-Ellen 365,000 

Rosenblatt, Max & Alice 734,000 

Rosenthal, Richard & Blanche 257,100 

Rosenwald, Harold 531,500 

Ross, Paul & Rita 460,400 

Ross, William & Marian 412,400 

Rossiter, Selina 486,600 

Rossoni, John & Paola 529,100 

Rossoni, Paola 169,000 

Rossoni, Peter/Philip/Lucia/Elizabeth 217,600 

Roth, David 544,100 

Row, Ronald & Jane 461,900 

Roy, Eugene U. 236,800 

Rudnick, Mitchell & Rosalie 705,200 

Rugo, Henry & Faith 532,800 

Ruland, Fred W. 681,700 

Rural Land Foundation 3,333,900 

Russell, Michael & Nancy P. 332,400 

Russell, Miles & Elaine 721,100 

Russell, William & Anne 1,080,100 

Ryan, Alice E. 364,000 

Ryan, Alice E. Tr. 257,900 

Ryan, Alice/Sweeney, Joanne 171,700 

Ryan, James & Helen 282,800 

Ryan, Marjorie H. 368,000 

Ryan, William & Helen 455,200 



4,295.22 
4,873.91 
2,433.54 
3,524.74 
5,355.06 
2,803.57 
2,974.54 
6,647.24 
4,000.40 
8,044.64 
2,817.32 
5,825.24 
4,045.98 
4,519.90 
5,333.14 
5,798.94 
1,852.24 
2,384.89 
5,963.34 
5,062.42 
2,595.33 
7,723.99 
5,839.49 
7,471.43 

36,539.54 
3,643.10 
7,903.26 

11,837.90 
3,939.44 
2,826.53 
1,881.83 
3,099.49 
4,033.23 
4,933.99 



Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn 

Sacerdote, Luciana 

Sachs, Reynold M. 

Saccnoff, Eric & Kathleen 

Sakowich, S & Kasiecki, J 

Salem, Deeb & Patricia 

Sallee, Mary & Nichols, Anthony 

Salmon, Marjorie 

Salvini, David K. Tr. 

Sanadi, D Rao & Mary Jane 

Sanchez, Ronald A. & Nina 

Sands, Mary M. 

Santa, Cecelia F. 

Sargent, Dennis, Tr. 

Sartori, Louis & Ruth 



285,800 
240,000 
523,700 
826,800 
171,600 
725,200 
130,800 
462,400 
391,700 
416,900 
266,300 
286,100 
299,200 
461,900 
444,900 



3,132.37 
2,630.40 
5,739.75 
9,061.73 
1,880.74 
7,948.19 
1,433.57 
5,067.90 
4,293.03 
4,569.22 
2,918.65 
3,135.66 
3,279.23 
5,062.42 
4,876.10 



224 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Sartori, Louis R. 
Satterfield, Anne P. , Tr. 
Savage, William G. 
Sawtell, Clement & Adelaide 
Schacht, Joel M. & Barbara 
Schatzberg, Alan & Nancy 
Scheff, Andrew 
Scheff, 3enson & Betty 
Scheft, William & Gertrude 
Scheuer, Harry 
Schildbach, Muriel 
Schiller, Joan 
Schliemann, Peter C. 
Schmertzler, Margaretta/ALvin 
Schmid, Wilfried & Marina 
Schneider, Robert & Patricia 
Schudy, Robert & Linelle 
Schuller, Edward & Elizabeth 
Schulte, Robert D. & Linda S 
Schwann, William & Ai re-Mai ja 
Schwann, William, Exec. 
Schwartz, Edward A. 
Schwartz, Ellen A. 
Scott, Eleanor B. 
Scotti, Regina 
Seaver, John & Millicent 
Seckler, Donald & Joann S. 
Sederquist, Douglas/Patricia 
Sedgwick, Harold B. 
Seeckts, E William & Eleanor 
Seeley, George W. & Susan 
Seitz, C. Clayton & Ellen 
Self, Craig L. 
Selland, James 0. 
Seising, Erik J. & Jo-Ellen 
Semerjian, Evan & Barbara 
Seville, Alfred & Joan 
Sewall, Steven & Susan 
Shansky, Alan 
Shansky, David & Nettie 
Shapiro, David & Esther 
Shapse, Steven N. 
Shaw, Michael & Lynette 
Shea, Timothy & Deborah 
Sheehan, Gerald & Brigid 
Sheldon, Mary W. 
Shuman, Mark & Lena 
Shyam-Sunder, Sivaraj/Lakshmi 
Sichel, Enid 

Silverstein, Fred & Mary 
Simmons, Jeffrey & Patricia 



154,900 


$ 1,697.70 


475,300 


5,209.29 


358,600 


3,930.26 


376,300 


4,124.25 


398,600 


4,368.66 


421,200 


4,616.35 


215,900 


2,366.25 


472,300 


5,176.40 


304,400 


3,336.22 


393,000 


4,307.23 


268,000 


2,937.28 


400,200 


4,336.19 


629,300 


6,897.13 


524,900 


5,752.90 


868,100 


9,514.38 


564,400 


6,185.82 


141,500 


1,550.84 


389,700 


4,271.11 


695,500 


7,622.68 


414,800 


4,545.21 


260,700 


2,357.27 


560,900 


6,147.46 


408,000 


4,471.68 


362,800 


3,975.29 


212,000 


2,323.52 


428,700 


4,698.55 


418,300 


4,584.57 


221,300 


2,425.45 


431,600 


4,730.34 


621,100 


6,807.26 


303,400 


3,325.25 


669,600 


7,338.31 


277,300 


3,039.21 


267,000 


2,926.32 


241,700 


2,649.03 


437,700 


5,345.19 


392,000 


4,296.32 


768,200 


8,419.47 


100,400 


1,100.33 


414,900 


4,547.30 


482,000 


5,282.72 


195,300 


2,140.49 


627,200 


6,874.11 


243,800 


2,725.85 


330,000 


3,616.80 


375,400 


4,114.38 


522,700 


5,728.79 


360,800 


3,954.37 


329,300 


3,609.13 


285,300 


3,126.89 


609,200 


6,676.33 



225 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



Simon, Michael & Margaret $ 425,000 $ 4,658.00 

Simourian, John 507,200 5,553.91 

Sioshansi, Piran & Mitra 673,200 7,378.27 

Sisson, Barbara B. 471,800 5,170.93 

Sisson, John.H. & Barbara, Tr 188,700 2,068.15 

Skinner, Louis & Hope 937,500 10,823.00 

Slavin, Gerald D 355,300 3,894.09 

SLayter, Henry S. 339,300 3,718.73 

Sliski, Alan & Susan 387,700 4,249.19 

Smallraan, Robert H. & Mary 636,600 6,977.14 

Smith, Alan & Marjorie 522,200 5,723.31 

Smith, Beverly J. 242,500 2,657.80 

Smith, Carl & Florence 307,200 3,366.91 

Smith, Colin L. & Diana 422,100 4,625.22 

Smith, Converse & Nellie 451,200 4,945.15 

Smith, Edward W. & Anne 243,600 2,669.86 

Smith, Grahame J.C. 261,500 2,866.04 

Smith, Harold & Elizabeth 391,000 4,235.36 

Smith, Kathleen 236,300 2,589.85 

Smith, Peter & Linda 1,500 16.44 

Smith, Steven & Karen 339,200 3,717.63 

Smith, William & Barbara 294,800 3,231.01 

Sraulowicz, Bronislaw/Sawera 355,800 3,899.57 

Snelling, Charles 305,800 3,351.57 

Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth 277,400 3,040.30 

Snelling, Jacquelyn 370,900 4,065.06 

Snelling, John R 238,500 2,613.96 

Snelling, Norman & Carolyn 232,700 3,098.39 

Soc. Preservation NE Antiquities 221,600 2,428.74 

Solar, Barry & Judith 564,300 6,184.73 

Solar, Jane M. 429,100 4,702.94 

Solman, Fred John & Claire 442,700 4,851.99 

Spaeth, Daniel & Margaret 303,400 3,325.26 

Speen, George & Claire 576,400 6,317.34 

Speert, Peter & Faye 654,000 7,167.84 

Sperling, Arnold & Charmian 400,900 4,393.86 

Spiliakos, John s. , 236,100 2,587.66 

Spindler, James & Mary 697,900 7,648.99 

Spinosa, Robert & Kathleen 600,500 6,581.43 

Spooner, Susan B. 161,200 1,766.75 

Sprague, John L 277,200 3,033.11 

Sprayregen, Lucy P. 532,100 5,831.82 

Squibb, Mildred G. 226,700 2,484.64 

Stara, Allan & Kathleen 805,600 8,829.33 

S tankard, Charles & Jean 418,300 4,584.57 

Stanzler, Alan & Margaret 601,100 6,588.06 

Stanzler, Alan & Margaret 130,300 1,428.09 

Staples, K & Kearsley, J 763,600 8,369.05 

Stason, William & Susan 585,900 6,421.46 

Staszesky, Barbara & Francis 283,300 3,104.97 

Stathis, Gregory & Marjorie 448,400 4,914.45 

226 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 



Stathos, Charles & Margaret 

Stebbins Realty Trust 

Stecher, Robert & Barbara 

Stein, Kitty & Langell, John 

Steinsky, Rudolph & Hayes, Donna 

Stetson, David & Athena 

Stevens Jr. , Edmund & Shari 

Stevenson, John & Patricia 

Stevenson, Philip & Joan 

Stewart, Francis & Ruth 

Stoddard, Roger & Helen 

Stone, Edmund 

Storer, James & Sandra A. 

Stout, Josephine 

Stratford Realty 

Stratton, Michael & Nancy 

Stratton, Nancy F. 

Straus, Haskel & Barbara 

Strecker, William & Nancy 

Street, Earle & Janet 

Striker, Marjorie 

Strock, Bruce & Deborah 

Subsick, Walter J. 

Sugar, Susan K. 

Summers, Julia 

Sussman, Joseph & Henri-Ann 

Sutherland, Robert L. 

Svetz, Paul & Linda 

Swain, Douglas & Rhonda 

Swanson, Richard & Nancy 

Sweeney, Carl & Alice 

Swett, Joan 

Swift, Phyllis 

Sykes, Margaret 

Sylvia, Craig, Paul & Mark 



$ 540,100 
244,900 
581,900 
234,500 
731,900 
665,200 
577,500 
425,800 
527,500 
396,300 
355,400 

1,037,400 
457,600 
245,100 

1,533,500 
331,100 
451,900 
751,500 
760,900 
472,100 
294,400 
603,800 
1,500 
638,600 
401,900 
495,200 
422,300 
435,200 
436,800 
266,000 
419,400 
277,200 
420,200 
360,900 
311,400 



5,919.50 
2,634.10 
6,377.62 
3,118.12 
8,021.62 
7,290.59 
6,329.40 
4,666.77 
5,781.40 
4,343.45 
3,895.18 

11,369.90 
5,015.30 
2,636.30 

16,861.96 
3,623.86 
4,952.82 
8,236.44 
8,339.46 
5,174.22 
3,226.62 
6,617.65 
16.44 
6,999.06 
4,404.82 
5,427.39 
4,628.41 
4,769.79 
4,787.33 
2,915.36 
4,596.62 
3,038.11 
4,605.39 
3,955.46 
3,412.94 



Tall Pines Realty Trust 
Tang, Eric & Doreen 
Tang, Thomas, Connie, Nora, Lisa 
Tannert, H Michael & Joanna H 
Tartaglia, Giovanni & Lucia 
Taschioglou, Kemon & Rhoda 
Tasha Group Development Corp 
Tat lock, Richard & Jane 
Taunton -Rigby, Alison 
Tavilla, J David & Dorothea 
Taylor, David & Cormay, T. 
Taylor, Edward S. 
Taylor, Frederick & Lex 
Taylor, Gerald & Susan 



1,500 
830,600 
222,200 
355,900 
273,700 
573,700 
,553,800 
503,800 
336,700 
709,500 
222,200 
529,300 
390,400 
492,600 



16.44 
9,651.33 
2,435.31 
3,900.66 
2,999.75 
6,287.75 
17,084.46 
5,521.65 
3,690.23 
7,776.12 
2,435.31 
5,801.13 
4,278.78 
5,398.89 



227 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Taylor, Julius & Lois 
Taylor, Lillian C. 
Taylor, Timothy & Jeannine 
Taylor, W Royce & Dorothy 
Taylor, William & Joyce 
Teabo, Prince & Elizabeth 
Telling, Irving & Jane 
Tenneco, Inc. 

Tennican, Michael & Catherine 
Terrell, John & Mary 
Tetreault, Claire F., Tr. 
Theriault, Richard & Vita 
Thomas Jr., George & Jane 
Thompson, G Brooks & Arlene 
Thompson, Lawrence & Dorothy 
Thomson, Anne P. 
Thome, Karen 0. 
Thornton, Peter & Ann 
Three S Realty Trust 
Thurow, Lester & Gretchen P 
Ticknor, H Malcolm 
Tinder, -Glenn & Gloria 
Tingley, Frederick & Dilla 
Titus, William A. 
Tod, Jane N. 
Todd, Conrad 
Toksoz, M Nafi & Helena 
Tomasic, Beverly F. 
Tong, Pin & Siang 
Torode, Herbert & Lorraine 
Torri, Myra M. 
Torti Jr. , Maurice & Nancy 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. 
Tracey, Robert & Caroline 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracy, Tara 

Travers, Paul & Bernice 
Travis, George F & Lenore 
Trevelyan, Eoin & J Ann 
Troisi, Eugene A. 
Troisi, Ferdinand & Mary 
Tryder, Michael & Maureen 
Tunnell, Raymond & Suzanne 
Turano, Anthony & Florence 
Turner, James & Mildred 
Turouski, Edmund & Josephine 
Tyler, Priscilla D. 
Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 
Tylko, John J. 



Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


$ 509,900 


$ 5,588.50 


242,000 


2,652.32 


298,500 


3,271.56 


373,300 


4,091.37 


615,100 


6,741.50 


272,000 


2,981.12 


413,900 


4,536.34 


1,700 


18.63 


541,800 


5,933.13 


292,300 


3,209.09 


485,400 


5,319.93 


626,800 


6,869.73 


236,300 


2,589.85 


306,400 


3,358.14 


485,400 


5,319.98 


277,700 


3,043.59 


318,000 


3,485.28 


16,900 


185.22 


657,700 


7,208.39 


1,024,000 


11,223.04 


314,100 


3,442.54 


470,500 


5,156.63 


331,900 


3,637.62 


123,900 


1,357.94 


235,000 


2,575.60 


811,400 


8,892.94 


182,800 


2,003.49 


661,100 


7,245.66 


283,900 


3,111.54 


274,200 


3,005.23 


378,700 


4,150.55 


543,800 


5,960.05 


527,800 


5,784.69 


604,100 


6,620.94 


314,500 


3,446.92 


100,200 


1,098.19 


452,300 


4,957.21 


239,700 


2,627.11 


303,300 


3,324.17 


317,900 


3,484.18 


250,700 


2,747.67 


304,700 


3,339.51 


391,900 


4,295.22 


90,000 


936.40 


363,000 


3,978.48 


622,500 


6,822.60 


304,100 


3,332.94 


180,800 


1,981.57 


964,700 


10,573.11 



223 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 
Real Estate Tax 



U S Dynamics Realty Trust 
Ullraan, Steven/ Amy & Gerald 
Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 
Uretsky, Joseph & Harriet 
Urion, David & Deborah C. 
Urner, Joseph F. 
Ury, William L. 



Vagliano, Andre & Leslie 

Vale, Lawrence & Julia 

Valles, Cynthia & Hebard, Geo. 

Valley Pond Corporation 

VanBuskirk, David & Elizabeth 

VanDam, Fay the & David S. 

VanLeer, Hans 

VanLeer, Hans & Mary 

VanLeer, R. Karl & Rachel 

VanLeer, Rachel D. 

Vataha, Randel & Deborah 

Venier, Anthony & Catherine 

Vercollone, Edmund & Julia 

Verma, Dharraendra & Karen Sinclair 

Vet, Maria F. 

Vitale, Joseph & Christine 

Vockel, Virginia 

Von der Lippe, George & Lawrence, Inez 

VoniMertens, Peter & Page 



Wadsworth, Virginia D. 
Wales, Philip u Roger 
Wales , R Langdon & Ruth 
Walker, John & Joan 
Walker, Roger S. 
Walker, Steven J. Tr. 
Walker, Sydney A. 
Wallroth, Donald & Eln Gay 
Wallwork, Edwin & Janice 
Walsh, Patricia R. 
Walter, Charlton & Rosly 
Wang, An & Lorraine 
Wang, Chiu-Chen & Pauline 
Wang, Frederick A. 
Wang, Thomas & Jacqueline 
Warbler Springs Corp. 
Warbler Springs Rd. Trust 
Ward, Jane L. 
Ward, Walter & Sophie 
Ward Jr, Walter & Marie 
Warner, Henrietta S. 

229 



$ 31,800 


$ 348.53 


553,900 


6,180.34 


344,200 


3,772.43 


568,500 


6,230.76 


493,100 


5,404.38 


336,500 


4,236.04 


382,800 


4,195.49 


637,600 


7,536.10 


446,400 


4,892.54 


176,100 


1,930.06 


10,700 


117.27 


459,000 


5,030.64 


106,400 


1,166.14 


1,800 


19.73 


440,800 


4,831.17 


495,000 


5,425.20 


144,500 


1,583.72 


518,900 


5,637.14 


752,500 


8,247.40 


290,700 


3,186.07 


315,600 


3,458.93 


317,000 


3,474.32 


316,900 


3,473.22 


276,300 


3,023.25 


420.200 


4,605.39 


451,400 


4,947.34 


389,000 


4,263.44 


169,000 


1,852.24 


422,500 


4,630.60 


440,100 


4,823.50 


303,000 


3,320.88 


6,300 


69.05 


518,600 


5,683.85 


595,100 


6,522.30 


311,600 


3,415.14 


235,300 


2,573.89 


432,500 


5,288.20 


1,407,100 


15,421.80 


512,800 


5,620.29 


169,000 


1,852.24 


519,500 


5,693.72 


3,076,900 


33,722.33 


40,600 


444.98 


250,900 


2,749.86 


246,500 


2,701.64 


255,400 


2,799.18 


506,900 


5,555.62 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Warner, Patricia R. $ 240,000 

Warren, Duncan & Helen 343,900 

Warren, Joan B. 281,600 

Waterfall Realty Trust 623,700 

Watkinson, Peter & Fannie 335,900 

Watson, John* & Gay V. 474,600 

Waugh, John S. 408,000 

Webb, Robert & Sonia J. 456,800 

Webster, David & Winifred 540,000 

Webster, Peter T. 534,500 

Wechsler, Joel & Josephine 416,100 

Weigel, Lynn & Irene 534,600 

Weigel, Lynn & Keevil, Charles 526,100 

Weisgall, Deborah & Wilder, Throope 432,600 

Weisman, Rodger & Pamela 979,600 

Welch, Michael & Claire 119,900 

Welch, Nathaniel & Debra 443,500 

Welch, Vernon & Leatrice 262,800 

Wengren, Margaret L. 666,300 

Wengren, Richard et al 66,000 

Wernicke, Brian & Joann S. 308,100 

Westcott, Vernon -& Mary 306,600 

Weston Rd Realty Trust 227,500 

Whalen, William & Mary 225,200 

What ley, Robert & Kay 251,100 

Wheeler, Bella C. 310,400 

White, Elinor & Grossbart, Samuel 299,100 

White, James & Carol 889,100 

White, John & Gina 529,200 

White, John & Katharine 342,400 

White, Robert & Marion 324,100 

Whiteside, Elinor I. 240,000 

Whiting, Marjorie M. 240,200 

Whitman, Lawrence & Joanne 464,600 

Whitman, Virginia R. 695,600 

Wiersema, Frederick 357,200 

Wiggin, Richard & Agnes 543,900 

Wilbor, Anne E. 939,000 

Wiley, David & Mary 453,000 

Wilfert, Fred & Eleanor 268,000 

Willerain, Julian & Jane 256,600 

Williams, John & Anne 317,300 

Williams, Pamela M. 490,900 

Williams, William & Gertrud 312,400 

Williams Jr., Edwin & Ruth 347,400 

Willraann, Werner & Margaret 527,100 

Wilson, Donald & Cheryl 408,800 

Wilson, Loretta E. 242,000 

Wilson, Robert A. 233,900 

WiLson, Robert & Freligh, Elizabeth 100,200 

Winchell Realty Trust 847,400 

230 



2,630. 
3,769. 
3,086. 
6,835. 
3,681. 
5,201. 
4,471. 
5,006. 
5,918. 
6,405. 
4,560, 
6,407. 
5,766, 
5,239. 

10,736, 
1,314. 
4,860, 
2,380, 
7,302, 
723, 
3,376 
3,360, 
2,493 
2,468, 
2,752 
3,401, 
3,278, 
9,744, 
5,800 
3,752 
3,552 
2,630 
2,632 
5,092 
7,623 
3,914 
5,961 

10,291 
4,964 
2,937 
2,812 
3,477 
5,380 
3,423 
3,807 
5,777, 
4,430 
2,652 
2,563 
1,098 
9,287 



40 
14 
34 
75 
46 
62 
63 
53 
40 
12 
46 
22 
06 
30 
42 
10 
76 
29 
65 
36 
78 
34 
,40 
19 
06 
98 
14 
54 
,03 
70 
14 
40 
,59 
02 
,78 
,91 
,14 
A\ 
,83 
28 
.34 
,61 
,26 
,90 
,50 
02 
.45 
,32 
.54 
19 
,50 






VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1990 



Winchell, Guilbert & Amy 

Winchell, Richard & Martha 

Winship, Lee & Joyce 

Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth 

Witherby, Marianne J. 

Wolf, Robert & Bryce 

Wolff, Jaraes & Carol 

Woll, Edward & Barbara 

Wong, Judith & Myers, Larry 

Woo, Robert & Lillian 

Woo, Way Dong & Emily 

Wood, Hilve & Walter Wood, Exec 

Wood , Nancy 

Wood , Ronald & Wendy 

Wood, Virginia S. 

Woodington, Mary L. 

Wright, Andrew & Greta 

Wu, Pei-Rin & Susan 

Wyatt, Peter & Janice 

Wyman, Michael & Kathleen 



Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 

Yamron, Joseph & Joan 

Yates, Nancy C. 

Yates, William & M Paige 

Yi, Cheng-Ying & Jen Hua 

Yore, George & Kathleen 

Yos, Jerrold & Ann 

Young, Anne 

Young, G Stewart 

Young, Lee & Jane 

Young, Robin & Laurie 

Yu, Sheng Hsiung & Chang 



Zee, Molly B. 

Zimmerman, Herbert E. 

Zock, Robt. & Bennett, P., Trs 

Zuelke, Laurence & Nancy 



Aggregate Value 


Reql Estate 


Real Estate 


Tax 


t 435,300 


$ 4,770.89 


409,200 


4,434.83 


395,200 


4,331.39 


718,800 


7,878.05 


, 256,200 


2,807.95 


278,300 


3,050.17 


435,300 


4,770.89 


274,200 


3,005.23 


301,700 


3,306.63 


336,100 


3,683.66 


402,700 


4,413.59 


^ — -314,000 


3,441.44 


320,200 


3,509.39 


351,000 


3,845.96 


157,800 


1,729.49 


343,500 


3,754.76 


576,400 


6,317.34 


336,000 


4,230.56 


327,500 


3,589.40 


363,700 


3,936.15 


25,400 


278.38 


634,700 


7,504.31 


237,100 


2,598.62 


169,000 


1,852.24 


320,700 


3,514.87 


173,900 


1,905.94 


212,400 


2,327.90 


638,900 


7,002.34 


424,900 


4,656.90 


444,100 


4,867.34 


282,900 


3,100.58 


1,127,600 


12,353.50 


572,000 


6,269.12 


4,500 


49.32 


448,800 


4,918.85 


299,100 


3,278.14 



231 





* 



■5jS! ; 

I* % * ; 



<r - mm 



: v i^- 












REPORT 
of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 
1991 - 1992 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Robert H. Adkins 

Lucian L. Leape 

Joseph Robbat, Jr. 

Marcia A. Roehr 

Peter C. Sugar 

Agnes Connors Wiggin 

L. Bruce Long, Jr., Chairman 



COVER: Photograph by 
William Shea 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1991 - 1992 

CONTENTS 

I. Introduction 
II. Revenue Estimates 

A. Tax Levy 

B. Non-tax Revenues 

C. Taxation 

D. Free Cash 
III. Operating Budgets 

A. Salaries 

B. Expense 

C. Education 



a. Elementary Schools 

b. L. S. Regional High School 

c. Minuteraan Vo-Tech High School 



D. Water Department 

E. Debt 

F. Pensions & Insurance 

G. Library 

IV. Proposition 2 1/2 Budget 

V. 1993 Budget Projections 
VI. 5-Year Capital Plan 
VII. Conclusion 
Exhibits 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1991-1992 

I. INTRODUCTION 

Continuing reductions in State Aid and other revenue, a growing 
school population and large increases in uncontrollable costs have 
resulted in a budget which reduces service in many areas. In the 
short term, the alternatives the Town faces are reduced services or 
higher taxes. In the long term, Town officials are working to 
consolidate departments, increase revenues and control the rapid 
increase in the "uncontrollable" items in the budget. An expanded 
section in this year's report (Section V) projects the budget for a 
second year. This projection shows that the next year (FY93) wilt 
require even deeper cuts in Town services, or another large tax 
increase, unless we can alter these cost trends. 

The Finance Committee asked all boards and departments to 
prepare level service budgets, i.e. budgets which do not provide any 
increase in services, and only allow for normal salary and 
inflationary increases. Early in the process, it became clear that 
the growing school population and cuts in State Aid and other revenues 
would result in a budget which exceeded our target override amount, 
and result in an unsustainable rate of increase in the tax rate. The 
Finance Committee asked the Selectmen to propose cuts in Tovm services 
and the School Committee to propose reductions in the school's 
budget. These revised budgets were carefully reviewed and, after 
additional adjustments and further review, were accepted by the 
Finance Committee. 

The Finance Committee is recommending an operating budget of 
$12,081,071.16 for Fiscal Year 1992, an increase of $910,551.48. This 
budget, which represents an increase of 8.2% from the prior year, does 
not include warrant articles and represents a decrease of $71,522.50 
for debt service. Due to decreases in State Aid and other revenues of 
$52,470, this budget and funding of a limited amount of warrant 
articles will nevertheless require an override of $585,000. (The 
available funds for warrant articles are less than the dollar amount 
of warrant articles proposed. See Table III. The Finance Committee 
warrant article recommendations will be distributed at Town Meeting.) 
This override, if approved, will result in an increase of 
approximately 8.5% in the average tax bill. This tax rate increase 
represents a compromise between our goals of maintaining level 
services and keeping the increase in the tax bill to a rate which does 
not exceed inflation. Unfortunately, in these difficult economic 
times, we could neither support a "level services" budget, which would 
have resulted in a tax rate increase of approximately 13%, nor coull 
we support a budget increase which approximated the rate of inflation 
because of the severity of the cuts necessary. 

As part of our review of budgets, we looked at controllable and 
uncontrollable expenses. Although most costs are controllable in the 
long term, they are "uncontrollable" in the short term. The 
reductions in service reflected in these budgets will result in the 
reduction of a position in each of the following departments: 
Library, Conservation, and DPW. By far, the area of greatest concern 
on the expenditure side is the increase in insurance costs, 

1 



particularly for health insurance. State-mandated programs reduce our 
options for controlling these costs, while these costs escalate out of 
sight. In 10 years, from FY82 to FY92 , insurance costs have gone up 
291%. Whereas in FY82, these items represented 7.9% of the budget, in 
FY92, they will represent 14% of the budget. The $410,000 increase in 
the insurance and pension line items between FY91 and FY92 make funds 
unavailable to improve the schools, maintain services at the Library, 
or maintain level services throughout the Town. This one area 
represents more than half of the proposed 8.5% tax increase. 

Additional detailed explanations of revenue projections and the 
Town budget appear in subsequent sections of this report. As part of 
the budget process, the Finance Committee reviewed 2-year budgets and 
5-year capital plans of all departments. Additionally, we reviewed 
cuts necessary to achieve a "no override" budget. Since the warrant 
articles and budgets have already been substantially reduced, clearly, 
the $585,000 in cuts necessary to achieve a "no-override" budget would 
result in drastic reductions in service and a large layoff of Town and 
school employees. Discussions of a Proposition -2 1/2 budget (a 
"no-override" budget), 2-year budget projections and the 5-year 
capital plan appear in later sections of this report. 

II. REVENUE ESTIMATES 

Revenues for FY 1992 have been affected by a reduction in State 
Aid and by reductions in other revenues and local receipts. With a 2 
1/2% increase in the tax levy allowable under Proposition 2 1/2, total 
available revenues from all sources are $12,070,5.01.00 (before any 
override). This is less than a 1% increase in available Revenues over 
FY91. Revenues are derived from three main sources: the property tax 
levy, State Aid of various sorts and revenue derived from other Town 
activities such as Water Department receipts, rental income from 
Town-owned properties, Recreation Department receipts, fees, and 
investment income. Our long term projections point to a continuing 
trend of diminishing revenues from the State, motor vehicle excise 
taxes and investment income. As a result, the cost of Town government 
will increasingly be borne by the local taxpayer. Unless trends in 
expenses and revenues can be changed, tax increases exceeding the rate 
of inflation can be expected for the next several years. Clearly, the 
Town must work to reverse these trends. 

In the FY92 budget, we anticipate using $510,000 in Free Cash 
to reduce the amount to be raised by taxation. (See Note 2.) 

If the recommended override of $585,000 is approved, net 
available revenues will be $12,655,501, an increase of 5.9% over FY 
1991. 



TABLE I 

Estimated Revenue for FY92 vs. FY91 (000's) 
(FY91 Adjusted) 

Revenues FY91 FY92 



Levy Limit 


$6,680 


$7,408 


Allowable Prop 2 1/2 Increase 


167 


185 


New Construction 


161 


113 


Excluded Debt 


1,101 


1,051 


Override 


400 


585 



Total Tax Levy 8,491 * 9,342 

Water Dept. Receipts 

Other Local Receipts 

Free Cash 

Other Available Funds 

Flint Fields Contributions 

State Aid 

Total Non-Tax Revenue 



620 


552 


** 


1,002 


1,006 


*** 


600 


510 


(Note 2) 


163 


361 


*** 


464 


372 


(Note 1) 


947 


852 




3,796 


3,653 




12,287 


12,995 




(206) 


(217) 




(87) 


(30) 




(40) 


(45) 




(333) 


(342) 




11,954 


12,653 





Total Receipts 

State and County Charges 
Overlay (Assessors) 
Snow & Ice 

Total Assessments 

Net Available Revenues 

Net Available Revenues. 

without Flint Fields 11,490 12,281 (Note 1) 

* Actual tax levy was 18 less than the tax levy limit. 

** Water fees are only raised to the extent necessary to offset the 
costs of the Water Department. Reduced operating costs in this area 
have resulted in a lowering of the offsetting revenue estimate. 

*** Other local receipts and other available funds include rental 
revenue, investment income, the Air Force and Metco Reimbursements, 
payments in lieu of taxes, motor vehicle excise, the Flint Fields 
contributions and any other miscellaneous revenue items. In recent 
years, a variety of unusual revenue items have boosted these sources. 
In FY92 estimates, we have included $170,000 for the re-appropriation 
of old Warrant Article balances. We anticipate declining motor 
vehicle excise revenues and no new "unusual" revenue sources for the 
near future. 

A. Tax Levy 

The Selectmen have voted to place a $585, 000 override on the 
ballot. This budget utilizes all $585,000 of the override. However, 
this override amount is insufficient to cover the total budget and 

3 



proposed warrant articles and results in reduction of service. (See 
Table III.) The override increases the levy allowable under 
Proposition 2 1/2 for future years. The actual tax levy, set by the 
Assessors, depends on the appropriations voted at Town Meeting (which 
cannot exceed the total tax levy including the override) . The 
override is set by the Selectmen in consultation with the Finance 
Committee and represents a balance between what we feel the taxpayer 
can afford and the amount necessary to fund the programs which the 
residents desire. In these difficult economic times, the setting of 
the override . number requires hard choices. The Finance Committee 
recognizes that the proposed increase represents a burden for many of 
our citizens. We also recognize that there are citizens who advocate 
programs regardless of cost. The balancing of these two important 
interests drives that budget process. 

B. Non-tax Revenues 

Non-tax revenues will decline substantially in FY92. In FY92, 
$372,000 is included in non-tax revenues. This money is from 
donations to the Flint Fields purchase and will be used to offset 
expenses, principal and interest payments specifically related to the 
acquisition. (See Note 1.) A one-time revenue source, taken by 
re-appropriating leftover warrant article balances, of $170,000 is 
included in other available funds. Also included in the FY92 revenue 
sources is Chapter 90 State Aid (for road work) for which the timing 
and certainty of reimbursement is uncertain. The Chapter 90 State Aid 
Revenue is offset by a warrant article appropriation. 

State Aid is forecast to decline by 10% from FY91. This 

forecast, submitted by the Selectmen, could be optimistic in light of 

the Governor's recent budget plan. We await additional information 
from the legislature on this issue. 

C. Taxation 

The average tax bill will increase by 8.5% if the override of 
$585,000 is appropriated at Town Meeting. Table VI shows the tax levy 
for the last 10 years, as adjusted for inflation. It is the goal of 
the Finance Committee to keep the average tax bill roughly in line 
with the rate of inflation. While the budget can be controlled in the 
long terra to achieve this goal, special Town projects and conservation 
purchases and increasing school enrollments have made this goal 
difficult to achieve. The goal of controlling the tax bill will be 
difficult in the short term without drastic reductions in the level of 
Town services. The long term solutions to our fiscal problems will be 
explored at the Fall 1991 planning conference. It is hoped that a 
consensus for pursuing additional sources of revenue can be reached at 
this forum. 

D. Free Cash 

In the FY92 budget, we anticipate using $510,000 in Free Cash 
to reduce the amount to be raised by taxation. (See Note 2.) This 
large sum of Free Cash, which is used to offset reductions in other 
revenues, is not expected to be available in future years. During our 
budget process, strong consideration was given to any action which 
might affect future years. Clearly, until the State fiscal situation 

4 



improves, we must anticipate declining revenues in virtually every 
area. As Section V shows (FY93 Budget Projections), projections for 
FY93 propose using $500,000 in Free Cash, and our projected tax 
increase is still in the double digit range. A 3-year projection (not 
shown) would show a revenue shortfall as a result of insufficient Free 
Cash. We anticipate that Free Cash replenishment will be below the 
10-year average of $250,000 per year. The reduction of this 
significant revenue source will result in higher taxes in the year of 
the shortfall, on top of already staggering 15.4% projected 
increases. In light of projected future tax increases, we could not 
support the use of a greater amount of Free Cash. This would benefit 
the current year at the expense of future years. 

III. OPERATING BUDGETS 

The operating budget which the Finance Committee supports is 
$12,081,071.16. In arriving at this number, the Finance Committee 
targeted a maximum override number which could be supported, and 
attempted to achieve "level service" budgets in critical areas. The 
Conservation Commission, Library and DPW were reduced below "level 
services." The Library and Conservation functions, in particular, 
will suffer reductions. In an effort to retain as many of the Town's 
services as possible, the road repaving and Town building maintenance 
warrant articles were eliminated. Cuts such as these cannot be made 
indefinitely. Road resurfacing and building maintenance projects will 
merely be deferred, not eliminated. In future years, taxes will have 
to be raised to cover these items. 

The Finance Committee is committed to managing increases in the 
tax rate. As revenue sources other than taxation continue to decline, 
we are increasingly concerned with ensuring a sustainable level of 
service in Town government. Cuts made in maintenance items are 
short-sighted, short term solutions to our fiscal problems. Our 
projections point to continuing revenue shortfalls for the next 2 to 5 
years. The down -sizing of Town government and the elimination of 
services necessary to hold tax increases to a reasonable level will be 
painful and require the input of all Town citizens. As residents of 
the Town, the Finance Committee members agonized over the impact of 
the cuts in services. All departments have been alerted to the 
potential for even deeper cutbacks in FY93. We are hopeful that long 
range budgeting and capital planning will help us to plan for 
department consolidations and an orderly introduction of capital 
projects. 

The Finance Committee supports an override to Proposition 2 
1/2, not to exceed $585,000, which is sufficient to fund the 
recommended budget and certain warrant articles. (Finance Committee 
warrant article recommendations will be distributed at Town Meeting.) 
Reductions in State Aid and other revenues, increases in 
uncontrollable costs, and rising school enrollment make an override 
necessary to support the recommended reduced level of service. 

The Finance Committee reviewed the impact of cuts in Town 
operating budgets necessary to achieve a no-override budget. In a 
no-override budget, less critical departments could be eliminated, 
while all departments would suffer deep cuts. The effects of cuts to 
reach a no-override budget are discussed in Section IV of this report. 

5 



Highlights of Major Budget Categories 





TABLE 


II 






Distribution 


of Budget 








Amount 


s (OOO's) 


Percent 




FY91 


FY92 


Increase 


General Government 


$ 898 


$ 910 


1.3 


(1) 


Public Safety 


1,243 


1,375 


10.6 


(2) 


Health & Sanitation 


135 


129 


^f.4 




Public Works 


893 


906 


1.4 




Library 


404 


353 


-11.4 




Recreation 


164 


171 


4.3 


(3) 


Housing Commission 


33 


21 


-36.4 


(1) 


Other 


23 


32 


14.3 


(4) 


Total Town Operations 


3,798 


3,902 


2.7 




Elementary Schools 


3,291 


3,620 


10.0 




LSRHS & Vo-Tech 


862 


961 


11.5 




Debt Service 


1,540 


1,469 


-4.6 


(5) 


Pensions & Insurance 


1,227 


1,637 


33.4 




Reserve Fund 


165 


150 


-9.1 





Budget Total $10,383 $11,739 7.9 

Budget total without 

Flint Fields Debt 

Service $10,419 $11,367 9.1 (5) 



Notes on Table II: 

(1) A re-allocation of salaries occurred in the Housing and General 
Government categories. A half-person is anticipated to be added to 
the Assessors' Office, a critical revenue raising department. Without 
this re-allocation of $9,852 from the Housing Commission and the 
addition of $20,000 to the Assessors, General Government would have 
decreased 2% and Housing would have decreased 5.6%. Although large 
savings were made in General Government in FY92, this trend cannot be 
expected to continue next year. One-time cutbacks in contingency 
funds, planning and engineering funds, and a $30,000 reduction in the 
Conservation Commission accounted for much of this trend. 
Additionally, cost-of-living increases are in a warrant article, and 
the budget does not, therefore, represent the total growth in the cost 
of General Government. 

(2) In FY91, a warrant article added two firefighters. The cost of 
these firefighters is included in the FY92 budget, but not in the FY91 
budget. The balance of this increase is due to union salary 
increases, fuel increases, and small items of new equipment necessary 
to maintain insurance ratings for the Fire Department. 



(3) Both the Recreation Department and the Housing Commission 
generate revenues that offset a large portion of the expense of their 
operations. The Finance Committee reviews the net cost to the Town 
rather than looking solely at the expense side. In each of these 
departments, the net cost to the Town is expected to decline in FY92. 

(4) Other expense is higher in FY92, largely due to an accounting 
change for the Celebrations Committee. Although the 4th of July 
fireworks are supported by donations, a new State requirement mandates 
that we show the expense in the budget. This expense is offset by 
revenues which are included in the General Fund. 

(5) Included in Debt Service is $372,000 for the Flint Fields 
conservation acquisition. This debt service is fully offset by 
donations in FY92, so it has no tax impact. 

A. Salaries 



One of the largest areas of increase in the budget is for 
salaries (both in the Town operations and in the Schools). In order 
to maintain Town services at the same level, roughly the same number 
of employees must be retained. Cutbacks in several departments will 
result in the loss of several positions. Employees are compensated in 
accordance with the Personnel Board's salary guidelines, which help 
keep our salaries competitive with surrounding towns and with private 
industry. Exclusive of the Schools, salaries are up $189,147 in the 
budget, and an additional amount for a general increase for non-union 
employees is included in a warrant article. The salary increase, 
adjusting for the warrant articles in both years and adjusting for the 
firefighters added at Town Meeting in FY91, represents an increase of 
2.5%. Approximately 1/3 of this increase can be attributed to the 
addition of a half-time position to the Assessors' Office. (See Note 
1 of Table II above.) The loss of positions in the Library, DPW, 
Conservation and Town Offices account for this low rate of increase. 

Within the School budget, the School Committee may allocate 
resources to hire new teachers. Our recommended budget requires that 
the Schools not exceed a budget which would provide level service 
comparable to last year. Additional teachers will be hired this year 
for an added section required by population growth. 

It should be noted that a large proportion of the budget is 
represented by Town salaries. Salaries represent roughly 70% of 
non-school, "controllable" costs. Normal cost of living increases and 
"step" increases can be expected to cause salaries to rise 
approximately 5% per year. 

B. Expenses 

The recommended budget shows a decrease in expense items of 
$12,653. This has been achieved through reductions in many budgets 
and the level funding of a few, offsetting large projected increases 
in utilities. It should be noted that most of the Town departments 
have achieved level funding of controllable costs for a number of 
years. On a long term basis, normal inflationary increases must be 
expected in expense categories. 



C. Education 

The proposed FY92 budget for the elementary schools is 
$3,620,359, up 10% from FY91. Lincoln's share of the Vo-Tech and 
Regional High School budgets is up 11.5%. The education budgets are 
voted by various school committees and, unlike other Town budgets, the 
schools are free to move funds fron line item to line item to meet 
their funding needs. Although the school budgets are reviewed in 
detail by the Finance Committee, the total school budget amount is the 
only number which can be approved by the Finance Committee. Quality 
public schools are a valuable asset to the Town. Property values are 
enhanced by the perception that Lincoln's schools ar.e among the best 
in the state. In the present economic climate, we are hopeful that 
the vacant Elementary School Superintendent position will be filled by 
an individual who can achieve academic excellence while working with 
the limited resources forecast to be available. 

1. Elementary Schools 

The Elementary Schools, like other Town departments, were asked 
to prepare a level-service budget. Increases which are uncontrollable 
include special education and transportation, up $29,194, utilities up 
$39,570, and teacher contractural salary increases, up $149,316. 
Included in the budget are increases of $96,739 for two new sections. 
One section was required to be added during FY91 due to a late influx 
of incoming students, and is reflected in this year's budget for the 
first time. Funding in FY91 came from one-time budget cost saving 
measures and a likely Reserve Fund transfer. 

The Finance Committee requested that the Schools find the funds 
for any curriculum initiatives within their existing budget. We will 
continue to support funding of costs associated with increasing 
enrollment and externally mandated programs, however, we feel that 
adequate resources must be found within the School budget to fund 
program changes and enhancements. 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

The High School has requested a 5.5% total increase in their 
budget. This budget requires further cutbacks and consolidations of 
programs. Lincoln's share of the budget will increase in FY92 due to 
a change in the apportionment (based on a 3 year average number of 
students attending). Lincoln's share of the total budget will rise 
from 11.5% in FY91 to 12.1% in FY92. The proposed budget requires the 
reduction of 4.75 positions, and represents a 2.8% increase in program 
expense and a 2.2% increase in fixed costs and salary costs. Much of 
the increased cost is required by the 2nd year of a 3-year teachers 
contract, in which it was agreed to provide the teachers with a 0% 
increase in FY91 and 8% increase in the current and following fiscal 
years. 



3. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

The total Vo-Tech budget is up $337,358 (3.6%). However, the 
cost to Lincoln is up $27,936 due to an increase in the number of 
Lincoln students attending this program. 

8 



D. Water Department 

The Board of Water Commissioners and the Department of Public 
Works are to be commended for their close cooperation. Improved 
coordination and sharing of resources have resulted in the DPW 
reducing one position. If Lincoln is to maintain a reasonable level 
of Town service, cooperation such as that between DPW and the Water 
Department must take place throughout our operations. 

The Water Department funds all capital projects and their 
annual operating budgets through water fees. The Water Department has 
projected their capital requirements for the next few years (FY91 
projects total $180,000), however, changing state and federal 
regulations could have a significant impact on the scope and timing of 
these projects. The Water Commissioners hope to manage the rate of 
increase in water fees and the timing of projects so that large 
increases in rates in any one year are avoided. 

E. Debt 

Debt service (interest and principal payments on debt) will 
decrease in FY92 due to the absence of any new projects and the normal 
reduction of interest cost resulting from continuing principal 
payments on our outstanding debt. Debt service is now the thiri 
largest budget item, having been passed by the continuing escalation 
of insurance and pension costs. Debt service is one of the most 
controllable aspects in the Town budget in the long term. The Finance 
Committee strongly recommends that Town boards work together to 
schedule purchases, projects and maintenance so that the level of debt 
service continues to decline or, at least, not increase. Large 
capital requirements of the Town and the Schools will prevent debt 
service from making dramatic declines in the near term. Creation of a 
stabilization fund, into which annual deposits would be made to fund 
future projects, was supported by both the Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee, however, budget limitations in the current year prevented 
us from proposing this warrant article. Excluding the Flint Fields 
debt (which will be paid out of donations in FY92), debt service 
represents over 9% of the Town budget. 



As part of our review of budgets, the Finance Committee 
requested a 5-year capital plan from each department. The results of 
this plan are shown in Table V. By continuing a process of long term 
planning, and utilization of a debt stabilization fund, we hope to 
reduce fluctuations in the tax rate caused by the debt service for 
large projects falling in the same tax year. 

F. Pensions and Insurance 

These items, which represent the largest portion of the 
uncontrollable items in our budget, continue to rise at a rapid rate. 
Health insurance premiums are, by far, the fastest growing item in our 
budget. Between FY91 and FY92, this item is expected to increase 
$309,000, an incredible 56%. State regulations limit our control over 
these costs and, in the short term, there is very little we can do to 
control them. The Finance Committee and Executive Secretary are 
working with neighboring towns to explore cost saving options and 
potential changes in legislation. In the interim, Town services must 



be reduced to cover these extraordinary increases. Property and 
indemnity insurance and pension costs, while not growing at this rate, 
continue to exceed the rate of inflation and also result in budgetary 
problems. The increase in pension cost is $28,802 in FY92, an 
increase of 8.3%. Property and indemnity insurance rose $24,640 in 
FY92, an increase of 9.3%. 

G. Library 

Substantial reductions were made in the budget of the Library 
in FY92. Cuts were made in salaries, book purchases, and 
miscellaneous line items totalling $67,000. By State statute, 
libraries which do not maintain their budgets at 2 1/2% above the 
average of the prior 3 years are subject to "de-certification." 
De-certification results in the loss of State Aid to the Library and 
other communities can vote to restrict the use of their libraries by 
Lincoln residents. (The FY91 State Aid amount was $6,000, however, 
this is one of Governor Weld's targeted cutbacks.) The Finance 
Committee has been meeting with surrounding communities to discuss a 
variety of issues. Several communities have stated that their library 
budgets will be cut and subject to de-certification. The Finance 
Committee believes that in light of the current budget problems of all 
towns, this statute, with its arbitrary cutoff, will be amended. 

IV. PROPOSITION 2 1/2 BUDGET 

The small size of government in the Town of Lincoln makes 
cutting budgets difficult. In larger communities, the large size of 
all departments allows the reduction of personnel to be accomplished. 
In Lincoln, many of our boards and departments only have one or two 
individuals. Cuts in personnel can require the complete elimination 
of a department. The Proposition 2 1/2 cuts outlined below call for 
the reduction of up to 12 positions (exclusive of school cuts). 

The budget the Finance Committee is recommending, plus an 
amount sufficient to cover the Water Department expenses and certain 
warrant articles, requires an override of $535,000. This override 
will be insufficient to support passage of all warrant articles on the 
ballot. Table III shows the calculation of funds available for 
warrant articles. 



10 



$11,739 




342 




$12,081 


(B) 


572 


(A 


856 





TABLE III 

FY92 Revenue and Expense Projections (000' s) 

REVENUES 

2 1/2 Tax Levy $8,757 

Other revenue 3,653 

Less Assessments (342) 

Recommended Override 585 

Total Revenue $12,653 (A) 

EXPENSES 

Budget 

Water Department 

Total Expense 

Total available for warrants (A - B 

Total of Warrant Articles 

The budget and warrant articles are voted at Town Meeting on 
Saturday on March 23. The override is voted as a ballot question at 
the Town Elections, Monday, March 25. In order to assess the impact 
of a failure of the override to pass, the Finance Committee asked all 
departments to prepare a list of budget cuts necessary to achieve a 
$585,000 reduction in the FY92 budget. Our original budget guidelines 
requested that all departments submit budgets which would result in a 
3.1% increase in the overall budget from FY91. Subsequently, it 
became apparent that the rise in the pension and insurance line items 
and the increasing school enrollment would require funding well in 
excess of the increase allowed under Proposition 2 1/2. The 
reductions necessary to achieve a $585,000 cut in Town expenditures 
will result in the elimination of some departments and an estimated 
cut of almost 20% in the number of Town employees. 

The reductions to reach a "no-override" budget described below 
are not necessarily the ones which would be taken should the override 
fail, but they represent the best efforts by the various boards to 
prioritize reductions in their areas of jurisdiction. The actual 
allocation of the cuts necessary to achieve a "no-override" budget 
require assumptions concerning the importance of the various services 
the Town provides. Elimination of entire departments or programs 
might be chosen as long-run solutions should an override fail. The 
Finance Committee chose not to make any assumptions as to the 
allocation. The discussion below represents the impact of dividing 
the cuts: $335,000 from the Selectmen's budgets and $250,000 from the 
Schools. 

The Selectmen would eliminate 12 positions throughout the Town 
Office budgets. This represents almost 20% of all Town employees 
(Police, Fire, Library, DPW, Conservation, Town Offices, Council on 
Aging, Housing Commission, Recreation). It should be noted that cuts 
were already made in many of these areas, in both salary and expense 
areas. 

11 



Cuts have been recommended in the Conservation Commission 
budget. Under a "no-override" budget, additional cuts would have to 
be made in this department. These cuts could make it difficult for 
the Conservation Commission to carry out its land management function. 

The Library Trustees would be forced to further reduce Library 
hours. Under the current budget, the Library will be closed one 
additional day per week. 

The Recreation Committee would eliminate maintenance of the 
Town fields saving $6,000. Since most of the Recreation Committee's 
expenses are covered by program revenues, further cuts in its budget 
would not save much money and would have a disproportionate effect on 
its programs. 

The Housing Commission generates an operating surplus, which is 
used to maintain its properties; therefore, only minor cuts in its 
budget have been recommended. 

The School Administration prepared a list of cuts necessary to 
effect a $250,000 reduction in its FY92 budget. This list was 
reviewed, but was not formally adopted by the School Committee. A. 
$250,000 cut in the School budget would result in a 6.9% reduction in 
its FY92 budget. Among the cuts recommended by the administration 
would be elimination of a math teacher, a reduction in substitute 
salaries, staff development and curriculum development funds, 
reductions in administrative costs, cutbacks in computer assistants, 
reductions in guidance and special needs programs and reductions in 
teachers aides. 

No cuts would be made in either the Vo-tech or Regional High 
School budgets. 

V. 1993 BUDGET PROJECTIONS 

The Finance Committee asked all departments to look ahead to 
FY93 to identify areas where they expect increases beyond those 
required by salary adjustments or inflation. The FY93 budget which 
results, is obviously, a very preliminary estimate which can only be 
used for planning purposes. The results of this exercise show that if 
other sources of revenue are not found, the Town can expect another 
substantial override in FY93. The assumption was made that State Aid 
would be reduced an additional 10% in FY92. State Aid is an important 
revenue source and any major fluctuation either way will greatly 
affect the override required in FY92. If the override is approved 
this year and non-tax revenue sources are assumed to be flat, the 
Proposition 2 1/2 allowable revenue increase is $233,000, plus new 
construction (normally $50,000). The problem the Town faces is 
simple. Non-tax revenues are flat or declining and the tax revenue 
portion of the budget, which represents under 70% of the revenue 
sources, is limited to a 2 1/2% increase without an override. As a 
result, the allowable non-override increase in total revenues is well 
under 2%. We are faced with further cuts in Town services and tax 
increases close to the 10% range for several years. 



12 



TABLE IV 

FY93 Revenue and Expense Projections (000' s) 

(Note: this is a budget projection for a future year.) 

1992 Tax Levy $8,291 

Proposition 2 1/2 increase 207 

New Construction 50 (See Note 1) 

Excluded Debt 1,108 

Total Tax Levy 9,656 

Other Revenues (Net) 2,336 (See Note 2) 

Total Receipts 11,992 

General Government 955 (3) 

Public Safety 1,443 (3) 

Public Works 951 (3) 

Other 746 (3) 

Schools 4,947 (4) 

Debt Service 1,371 

Pensions & Insurance 2,123 (5) 

Reserve Fund 150 

Budget Total $12,691 

Level Fund Warrant articles 422 (6) 

Total Budget and Warrants $13,113 

Budget Deficit $1,121 

Tax increase necessary 15.4% 



Notes to Table IV: 

1) A reduction in the construction in North Lincoln and the effects 
of the recession should return the new construction amount to a lower 
level. 

2) Non-tax revenue is comprised of a variety of items. Projected to 
decline are: State Aid (10%), the loss of a one-time revenue source of 
$170,000, use of $500,000 in Free Cash and a reduction in the Flint 
Fields donation to the Town. The Water Department is not included in 
either the revenue or expense portions of this projection. 

3) Projects a 5% increase in all categories. Since the majority of 
the budget is salaries, and salaries are rising in the 5% per year 
range, the 5% number assumes that most expense items are level 
funded. Water Department costs are not included in either the 
revenues or expenses. 

4) Projects an 8% increase in the School budget. This may be low in 
light of continuing enrollment increases. 

5) Pensions and insurance premiums are forecast to rise 30%, which is 
in line with the historical average. 

13 



6) Level-funding of warrant articles will not allow us to achieve all 
of the capital programs scheduled for the year per Table V in Section 
VI. 

VI. 5 -YEAR CAPITAL PLAN 

The Finance Committee asked all departments to prepare a 
5-year plan of capital expenditures. The information provided by the 
departments and boards can be used to control the timing of large 
capital projects and equipment acquisitions. The information shown 
below summarizes the information presented to the Finance Committee. 
The requests for capital have not been reviewed in detail, and actual 
capital expenditures will, in all likelihood, be different from those 
shown below. The Schools are sponsoring a warrant article for a 
review of their space and capital needs. The School capital needs are 
expected to be much larger than those shown here. When the results of 
the study are available, the Finance Committee, the Selectmen, the 
School Committee, and other interested Town boards will work to 
develop a capital plan which matches capital expenditures with 
expected available revenues. 

Table V 

5 Year Capital Plan (000' s) 



FY93 FY94 FY95 FY96 FY97 
Schools 

School Roof Repair $ 52 156 45 

Handicap Access 10 10 10 10 10 

Replace Oil Tanks 36 327 

New Lighting 90 

Replace Draperies 15 

Conservation 

CLM Truck 20 

Ranger Truck 20 

Dump Truck 20 

Mower 3 

Land Acquisition ? ? ? ? ? 

Library 

None Anticipated 

DPW 

Replace Pickup 
Replace Case Tractor 
Replace Sander 
Road Improvements 

Police & Fire 
New Fire Engine ] 
New Police Vehicles 
Fire Station Renovation 

Town Bldgs Maintenance 35 35 35 35 35 

Water Department Projects depend on EPA and State requirements 

14 






22 

















70 

















8 





60 


70 


80 


90 


100 


50 














30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


9 


750 












VII. CONCLUSION 

The revenue and insurance cost problems facing the Town of 
Lincoln are not one year problems . The State's fiscal problems will 
not be solved overnight, and Lincoln can expect continuing 
uncertainties about the level of State Aid. The Town has been seeking 
to develop other revenues to compensate, however, solutions such as 
these take time to develop, and the likelihood of developing a major 
source of new revenue is remote. The Town must work together to 
control costs, slow the pace of new projects and work with our 
legislators to promote changes in restrictive and expensive statutes. 
As the level of service continues to decline, we must work to increase 
volunteer efforts wherever possible. 

Proposition 2 1/2, which limits the tax levy increase to 2 1/2% 
over the prior year, does not provide sufficient revenue to the Town 
to meet normal salary increases. The Finance Committee believes an 
annual tax increase which approximates the rate of inflation is 
preferable to a "no-override" budget which would result in continuous 
erosion of the quality of education and of the services the Town 
provides. The Finance Committee will continue to seek ways to reduce 
the rate of increase in taxes. The small size of Lincoln's budget 
makes controlling fluctuations in the tax rate difficult. A.s can be 
seen from this year's budget, uncontrollable factors such as rising 
school enrollments or insurance cost increases can dramatically affect 
the tax rate. The Finance Committee is increasingly utilizing long 
term planning to try to smooth large tax fluctuations. The solutions 
to the problems require long term, sustained effort. They cannot be 
dealt with in a 1-year budget context. 

The Finance Committee urges your support in the passage of the 
override ballot question. We are convinced that after a careful 
review of all cost centers in Lincoln, we are recommending a budget 
which preserves critical services while keeping the tax rate from 
being too great a burden for the average taxpayer. 

The Fall Planning Conference scheduled for the Fall of 1991, is 

an opportunity for all residents to meet and develop a vision of 

Lincoln's future. Clearly, budget problems will affect what can be 

done. The Finance Committee is looking forward to participation in 
this conference. 

In conclusion, we would like to thank all Town boards, 
departments and committees. The Finance Committee requested 
additional information, capital plans and 2-year budgets from all 
departments. These requests required many additional hours from Town 
personnel and volunteers. Our meetings often ran late into the night 
as we questioned board and committee members and department heads 
about their budgets. All budgets were well-prepared and included no 
unnecessary or new programs. We applaud the spirit of cooperation 
exhibited by all members of Town government as we faced this 
particularly difficult budget year. 



15 



Note 1 : At Town Meeting in April 1939, the Town approved the purchase 
of the North Flint Fields property and the purchase of development 
rights on the South Flint Fields property. Fundraising done by the 
Conservation Commission resulted in over 1.3 million dollars donated 
towards the purchase. The Town chose to use the donations to pay the 
interest and principal costs of the property during the early years, 
thus reducing the tax rate impact of this acquisition. During FY91, 
$454,156 in donations were used to offset the principal and interest 
payments. In FY92, the donations of $372,317 will be used to offset 
principal and interest payments. The original plan called for a 
declining percentage of the cost to be supported by donations in FY93 
and beyond. 

Note 2 ; Free Cash represents funds available for the use by the Town 
for any purpose. Free Cash is increased each year by budget 
"turnbacks" (unspent funds from the prior budget year) and by any 
revenue which exceeds the amount budgeted. The largest source of Free 
Cash for the Town of Lincoln has been from interest earnings. 
Projects are bonded early in the fiscal year, however, the funds may 
not be completely expended until the end of the year. The unspent 
funds are invested and the interest is available in August of the 
following year as Free Cash. Conservative revenue budgeting is 
another reason for large Free Cash balances. The State requires that 
towns provide a history of a revenue source prior to inclusion in 
budget estimates. New revenue sources, or increasing revenue sources 
lag at least one year due to this process, also resulting in Free 
Cash. In FY92, the Finance Committee proposes to use $510,000 of the 
$1,093,858 of certified Free Cash. The uncertainty of State Aid 
receipts dictates a conservative use of these funds. Accordingly, the 
Finance Committee will retain a balance of $583,853 in Free Cash to be 
used to offset revenue declines in future years, and to be held for 
emergencies. Since the Town is no longer involved in any major 
capital projects, the Free Cash expected to be. available for the FY93 
budget is expected to decline. (See table below.) 

FY91 FY92 FY93 FY94 FY95 

Free Cash: 7/1 1,093,858 833,858 583,858 433,858 283,853 

Use of Free Cash 510,000 500,000 400,000 400,000 250,000 

Projected 

Increase: 6/30 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 

Balance: 7/1 833,858 533,358 433,858 233,853 283,858 



16 



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18 



. 



TABLE 7 
Debt Service From FY 90 Projected Through FY 97 (OOP's) 
Item FY 90 FY 91 FY 92 FY 93 FY 94 FY 95 FY 96 FY 97 

Land Purchase 
Energy Conservation 
Sandy Pond Purchase 
Codraan Farmhouse 
Ricci Land Purchase 
McIIugh Land Purchase 
Library Addition 
Library Renovation 
School Roof 
Bathhouse 
DPW Equipment 
Landfill Closure 
Transfer Station 
TOTAL 1,032 1,141 1,034 1,014 935 727 618 558 

Flint Fields 77 338 372 357 342 327 311 296 

Less Contributions 77 383 316 231 136 327 



24 


23 


22 


21 










24 


22 


21 












204 


194 


183 


172 


161 








14 


13 


12 


11 


11 








112 


101 


95 


89 


84 


78 






91 


88 


84 


81 


77 


74 


81 


86 


345 


332 


319 


306 


293 


280 


257 


227 


44 


42 


40 


38 


37 


35 


33 


29 


89 


85 


82 


73 


75 


72 


68 


65 


28 


27 


26 


25 


23 


22 


21 




18 


17 


11 


11 










24 


120 


115 


111 


106 


101 


96 


92 


15 


77 


74 


71 


68 


65 


62 


59 



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21 



REVENUE BREAKDOWNS 
1983 v. 1992 



r\ o "7 
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33 



WARRANT 
1991 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting 
for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School 
Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-third day of March 
next, at 9:30 A.M., then and there to act on the following articles, 
except Article 1, and also to meet at the Smith School Gymnasium on 
Monday, the twenty-fifth day of March next, at 7:30 A.M., then and 
there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of this 
Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at least before the 
twenty-third day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March 
twenty-fifth, will be opened at 7:30 A.M. and will be closed at 8:00 
P.M. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one or more members for each 
of the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

School Committee member for three years 

Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health member for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Planning Board member for five years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Trustee of Berais Fund for three years 

DeCordova & Dana Museum and Park Trustee for four years 

Housing Commission member for three years 

Recreation Committee member for three years 

Regional School Committee member (2) for three years 

and also the following questions: 

(1) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an 

additional $585,000 in real estate and personal property 
taxes for the purposes of funding the Town's operating 
expenses for the fiscal year beginning July first, 
nineteen hundred ninety-one?" 



34 



(2) NON-BINDING PUBLIC OPINION ADVISORY QUESTIONS 

The Town Is facing many difficult budgetary issues now and 
for the foreseeable future. The School Committee must 
address those issues, along with space considerations and 
sound educational values, in determining the future course 
of the Lincoln schools. The results of this referendum, 
although not binding on the School Committee, will help 
the School Committee and other Town Boards to understand 
the views of the Town about the schools' participation in 
the METCO program, as the School Committee develops its 
policies and priorities for the future of our schools. 
This question assumes that state funding for the METCO 
program in Lincoln (currently approximately £350,000) 
remains relatively stable, and assumes that any change in 
METCO policy would not affect students currently enrolled 
in the program in Lincoln. Please answer yes or no to 
each of the five numbered questions below. Please be sure 
to read all questions before answering. 

A. An increased school budget which would accomodate a 
METCO policy guaranteeing seats for a fixed number of 
METCO students in all classrooms (the basis for School 
Committee METCO policy from 1975 until recently) could 
require as many as 3 to possibly 9 additional class 
sections over the next 5 years at an estimated cost of at 
least $75,000 per new section per year, resulting in 
incrementally higher property taxes and/or reductions in 
monies available to fund other town and/or school programs 
and services. Therefore, do you favor: 

i. 4 METCO students per class section (could require as 
many as 7 to 9 new class sections over 5 years)? 

ii. 2 METCO students per class section (could require as 
many as 3 new class sections over 5 years)? 

B. A METCO policy to admit METCO students up to a stated 
goal of participation on a space available basis without 
adding class sections (the basis for current School 
Committee METCO policy) is designed to maintain town 
contributions to the METCO program at roughly current 
levels (estimated to be at least $200, 000 annually in 
addition to state funds), adjusted for inflation, but 
could possibly result in the presence of no METCO students 
in certain grades, depending on local enrollments. 
Therefore, do you favor: 

iii. Goal of 4 METCO students per class section? 

iv. Goal of 2 METCO students per class section? 

v. Do you favor no expenditure of Town funds for the 
METCO program in the future, making it imposible to 
continue a METCO program in Lincoln? 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 
Law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 



Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 
any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sura of money, in addition to that authorized under 
Article 5 of this Warrant, to provide general pay increases for 
non-union employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the 
Library Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Library Trustees 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1991, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, 
in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

Selectmen 



36 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen 

and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary 
school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

School Committee, Selectmen 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to Lincoln Schools for purposes of 
education, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by various 
departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see 
if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess 
vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 

by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof to be used for the construction, 
reconstruction, and/or maintainance and repair of roads and bridges, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and 
maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sura of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said sura to be used 
for construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of the 
Town's roads, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

37 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be put 
into the Town's Stabilization Fund, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to approve an amendment to 

the preliminary development and use plan for the North 
Lincoln Planned Development District No. 1, previously approved for a 
mixed-income housing development known as "Battle Road Farm" pursuant 
to a motion adopted under Article 6 of the Warrant for the November 1, 
1936 Special Town Meeting, for the purpose of establishing a new 
minimum percentage of not less than forty percent (40%) of the housing 
units being designated for affordable housing in accordance with 
program guidelines of the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency and the 
Massachusetts Housing Partnership, or similar agencies or entities, 
rather than the minimum of sixty percent (60%) of such units being 
designated for affordable housing as currently provided, and to 
approve related amendments to the preliminary development and use plan 
altering the required number of affordable units in each phase of the 
aforesaid development and otherwise dealing with the mix of affordable 
and market-rate housing, the text of which amendments is on file with 
the Town Clerk; and to further authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
amend the existing purchase and sale agreement between the Town and 
the developer and' any other agreeement relating to the aforesaid 
development, in order to reflect such reduction in the minimum number 
of housing units being devoted to affordable housing; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sura of money 

from Public Works salaries, for which an appropriation by 
taxation was previously voted as part of the FY 1991 Budget under 
Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1990 Annual Town Meeting, to Water 
Department salaries, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate all of the 
unexpended balance of the proceeds of a loan which was 
originally borrowed pursuant to a vote under Article 7 of the Warrant 
for the Special Town Meeting held on November 5, 1979 for the 
installation of new chemical equipment at various Water Department 
locations and the construction of an addition to the Tower Road well 
house, in order to purchase water meters, money for which may be 
borrowed under the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 
38 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will take further action with respect 

to the proposed financing of the laying and/or relaying 
of certain water mains along Route 2 in the areas of the intersections 
of Lexington Road, Page Road and Mill Street, for which an original 
appropriation of $75,000 was previously voted under Article 23 of the 
Warrant for the 1988 Annual Town Meeting and an appropriation of 
$330,000 to be used to supplement the appropriation under Article 28 
and to also be used to provide for the laying and/or relaying of 
certain water mains in the additional area of the Route 2 and Bedford 
Road intersection (the "Supplemental Appropriation") was voted under 
Article 25 of the Warrant of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting, by (i) 
reducing the amount of the Supplemental Appropriation as previously 
approved, (ii) rescinding the authority to borrow $180,000 of said 
Supplemental Appropriation, and/or (iii) providing that the portion of 
the Supplemental Appropriation not to be borrowed shall alternatively 
be provided by taxation or by transfer or appropriation from available 
funds, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 
funding a Town-wide planning conference in the Fall of 1991, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General Bylaws 

by adding a new Article XX entitled Underground Storage 
Tank Bylaw , to control the use, maintenance and removal of underground 
tanks for the storage of oil or hazardous substances and thereby 
provide protection to the Town's aquifers as well as those of 
surrounding communities, a copy of which proposed Article XX is on 
file with the Town Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 



Aquifer Protection Study Committee 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Tov/n will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purposes of 

undertaking necessary remodeling and/or repairs to the Town's school 
buildings in order to improve access to handicapped persons, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



39 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing, or any combination thereof, including without limitation by 
appropriation of all or any portion of (i) the unexpended balance of 
the proceeds of a loan for $750,000, which was originally borrowed 
pursuant to votes under Article 15 of the Warrant for the 1987 Annual 
Town Meeting and Article 50 of the Warrant for the 1989 Annual Town 
Meeting to close out the landfill area, (ii) the unexpended balance of 
the proceeds of a loan for £480, 000, which was originally borrowed 
pursuant to votes under Article 12 of the Warrant for the 1988 Annual 
Town Meeting and Article 49 of the Warrant for the 1989 Annual Town 
Meeting to design and construct a permanent transfer station at the 
landfill site, (iii) the unexpended balance of an appropriation from 
Free Cash of $145,000 pursuant to the vote under Article 22 of the 
Warrant for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting to ensure the removal and 
ongoing maintenance and repair of asbestos material, and (iv) the 
unexpended balance of an appropriation from Free Cash of $83,320 
pursuant to the vote under Article 1 of the Second Special Town 
Meeting held on March 24, 1990 for various capital improvements, 
renovations and repairs to the Town's school buildings and for design 
and engineering services, all for the purpose of providing for the 
replacement of boilers at the Smith School; or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Board of Selectmen and School Committee 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 
developing a master plan for capital improvements related to school 
facilities, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the design of 
capital improvements to the Town's water system, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



40 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw by 

making certain additions to Section 4 ( NON-CONFORMING 
USES ) in order to grant non-conforming protection to or otherwise 
define the status of lots which are reduced in size by eminent domain 
takings or certain other public acquisition, a copy of the text of 
which proposed amendment is on file with the Town Clerk and at the 
Planning Board Office, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 14.3.2(d) 

of its Zoning Bylaw by making a technical correction, 
inserting the word "or" after the words "The construction and", to 
read as follows: 

(d) the construction and/or occupancy of the apartment 
will not be detrimental to the neighborhood in which the 
lot is located or injurious to persons or property; , 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 6.5.5 of 

its Zoning Bylaw ( Yards ) by inserting the words "for the 
principal building" after the word "yards", to read as follows: 

6.5.5. Yards . The minimum front, side and rear yards 
for the principal building shall be 50 feet;, 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



41 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw by 
making certain changes to Section 13 ( Area, Frontage, and 
Yard Requirements ) as follows: 

(i) deleting Section 13.2.1 in its entirety, 

(ii) deleting the words "dwelling or principal 
non-residential structure" and subtituting therefor the 
word "building" in the second sentence of Section 13.2.3, 
. to read as follows: 

There shall be not less than the required distance 
between said lot lines at all points from the street 
line to the principal building. 

(iii) deleting the words "dwelling or main residential 
structure" and substituting therefor the words "principal 
building" in Section 13.2.4, to read as follows: 

A lot on a turning circle of a dead end street may 
have a frontage of not less than 80 feet provided that 
the shortest distance between side lot lines shall be 
at least 120 feet at every point more than 35 feet 
from the street line to the principal building. 

(iv) deleting the words "any dwelling" and substituting 
therefor the words "the principal building" in Section 
13.2.8, to read as' follows: 

Front yards shall be measured from any street line to 
the nearest point of the front wall of the principal 
building or any accessory structure... 

(v) deleting the words "nearest part of any dwelling or 
main non-residential structure" and substituting therefor 
the words "nearest point of the principal building" in 
Section 13.2.9, to read as follows: 

Side and rear yards shall be measured from the nearest 
point of the principal building to each side lot line 
and the the rear lot line., 

(vi) renumbering the existing paragraphs 13.2.2 through 
13.2.9 as 13.2.1 through 13.2.8, 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



42 



ARTICLE 29. That the Town votes to appropriate the sura of $10,000 

from Free Cash to be used for the cost of aerial mosquito 
larvae spraying in known breeding areas. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 30. That the Lincoln Town Meeting vote to petition the 

Trustees of the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust to allow 
BTi aerial and ground spraying of mosquito larvae to be conducted 
beginning Spring, 1991 by the Town on land held by the Trust for the 
benefit of the inhabitants of Lincoln. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to ratify or renew its 

authorization to the Board of Selectmen, previously given 
by vote adopted under Article 46 of the Warrant for the 1989 Annual 
Town Meeting, to petition the General Court for special legislation 
which would effectively supercede or amend Chapter 360 of the Acts of 
1979 of the General Court, which originally authorized the creation of 
the Lincoln Housing Commission, in order to provide that the powers 
and duties of the Housing Commission, and the procedures for the 
exercise of such powers and duties, shall be substantially identical 
to those powers, duties and procedures which are applicable to 
muncipal housing authorities as set forth in Chapter 121B of the 
General Laws, all in order to permit the Town to fully participate In 
State funding for affordable or subsidized housing programs, provided , 
however , that the Selectmen shall use their best efforts to seek 
inclusion in such special legislation of language which assures (i) 
that no power of eminent domain shall be exercised by the Housing 
Commission except upon a confirmatory vote of the Lincoln Town 
Meeting, and (ii) that the Housing Commission shall be obligated to 
report to each Annual Town Meeting of the Town of Lincoln (but shall 
not be obligated to seek Town Meeting approval, except pursuant to 
otherwise applicable law) as to (a) any plans for the construction, 
rehabilitation or use of housing which is not in compliance with the 
existing zoning bylaw of the Town, and (b) any portion of the Housing 
Commission's budget which is funded by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts rather than by the Town, and provided , further , that 
such special legislation shall not take effect unless it has been 
presented to and approved by a subsequent Town Meeting; and to see if 
the Town will further authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all 
other actions which may be necessary or appropriate in furtherance of 
the foregoing vote. 

Housing Commission 



43 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 59, 

Section 5, Clause (37A) of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, which will increase the exemption from taxation of real estate 
to the sum of $500 for those residents of the Town who are legally 
blind, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Assessors 



ARTICLE 33. -To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 59, 

Section 5, Clause (17D) of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, which will allow the exemption from taxation of real estate to 
the taxable valuation of $2,000 or the sum of $175.00, whichever would 
result in an abatement of the greater amount of actual taxes due, for 
certain surviving spouses or minors or certain persons over seventy 
years of age, subject to the conditions set forth in said statute, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Assessors 



ARTICLE 34. To see whether or not the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1990, thereby 
allowing the Town to receive enhanced 911 telephone service as defined 
in said Act and, at no cost to it, the benefits of enhanced 911 
network features and network components, including at least one public 
safety answering point, and any other enhanced 911 network features 
that may be made available by the statewide emergency 
telecommunications board, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 35. To establish a bylaw, or other mechanism, to pay ten 

percent of savings voted at Town Meeting to person 
proposing saving. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 36. To establish a fund to give prizes based on the skill and 
knowledge of school graduates and classes, to be given to 
key people, such as teachers, students, and parents. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 37. To establish a growth fund to compound untouched until 

its annual income equals Town expenses, to then be used 
to establish a zero tax rate - for evermore. 

By Petition 

44 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings, 
thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this twenty-fifth day of February in 
the year of our Lord one-thousand nine-hundred ninety-one. 



Katherine S. McHugh 
Harriet B. Todd 



Warren F. Flint, Jr., Chairman 



SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



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542